Was WWII Fought to make the World Safe for the Bankers?


by Dr. Ingrid Rimland Zundel

Thanks to best-selling author, David Irving, the establishment view that the United States of America became embroiled in World War II as a result of a surprise attack on Pearl Harbour on December 7, 1941 is no longer accepted by major historians. The origins of this conflict, says South African politician and noted banker, Stephen Goodson, have far deeper roots.

Goodson explains the background as follows:
During the 1930s Japan rapidly expanded her industrial production, while the rest of the world, with the exception of National Socialist Germany, stagnated. By 1941 Japan had become the leading economic power in East Asia. Her exports were steadily replacing those of America and England.
Writes Goodson:

  • Japan has very few natural resources, so what was the secret of her success? In order to answer this question, it is necessary to return to the year 1929, when one of the twentieth centuryís foremost monetary reformers, Major Clifford Hugh Douglas, went on a lecture tour of Japan.
Douglasís economic theory advocated the transfer of the money creation process from private banks, which create money out of nothing as an interest-bearing debt, to the state. This government created money he termed social credit. He also favored the payment of a basic income or national dividend to each citizen. This dividend would provide consumers with the additional buying power necessary to absorb all the current production of goods in a non-inflationary manner.



Major Clifford Hugh Douglas


  • Douglasís financial proposals for an honest money system, based on government creating the nationís money and credit on an interest-free basis, were enthusiastically received by Japanese industry and government.

All Douglasís books and pamphlets were translated into Japanese, and more copies were sold in that country than in all the rest of the world put together. Since its inception in 1882 the largest shareholder of the Bank of Japan (Nippon Ginko) had been the Japanese Imperial Household. Its reorganization into a state bank, which was administered exclusively for the accomplishment of national interests, was implemented in 1932. The reform of the central bank was completed in February 1942 when the Bank of Japan Law was remodelled on the Reichsbank Act of Germany of 1939.

Goodson continues here:

http://www.veteranstoday.com/2011/06...afe-for-usury/