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Thread: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

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    Default Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    A buddy of mine recently told me about a slew of wild raspberry bushes near his property, so in lieu of my original plans to plant store-bought blackberry bushes in my yard, I'm going to start moving a bunch of the raspberry bushes from the woods to my back yard. The soil has a lot more clay in it where the bushes are in the woods, but the soil in my yard is jet-black. Is there anything special I should do in terms of soil amendments before I move the bushes from the clay soil to my yard?
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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    As far as amendments go, I would just use manure. I don't think that you really need anything special. The main thing is to use lots of water with raspberries. Once you get your hole dug, fill it with water and after some of the water is drained put the new plants in. Also, make sure you trim them back to 3-6 inches once planted.

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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    My advice would be to transplant then when it is raining; they do no do well if their roots dry out at all. Mulch the area (mulching encourages suckering) and sprinkle any regular fertilizer around (10-10-10, etc).

    However, I would recommend that you buy some rather than using the wild ones; the yield is much, much heavier. My yard is full of all kinds (I'm a raspberry nut, I fill my freezer every year). I have wild ones, regular ones, and everbearers. An everbearer like "Heritage" is great because they don't need staking, and you can get two crops per year or, if you are lazy, mow them all to the ground in winter and you get one big crop in the fall.

    Raspberries give you more bang for your buck than pretty much anything. My friend makes raspberry wine and it is the best homemade wine ever!

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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    I strongly recommend testing your soil before you alter it. A soil test kit will cost $3 to $5 at your local nursery. It will contain four vials to test pH(acidity), N(nitrogen), P(potassium), and K(potash). The profile of your fertilizer should match the needs of your plant, addressing the soil deficiencies.

    Raspberries perform best at a pH of 5.6-6.2. You can be outside that range, but the further out you are, the more your crop/plant health will be affected. If your soil measures lower than 5.1 or higher than 6.7, you WILL want to address pH balance. Ground limestone will bring pH up, while sulfur or sulfur flowers will bring it down. It's considerably easier to raise pH balance than to lower it.

    A 10-10-10 fertilizer (as suggested by OldManSmith) is a good option if you will not test your soil, but the best option is always to know your soil so you can properly supplement it. Good luck with the berries!

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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    I would suggest looking at craigslist for someone who is giving away raspberry plants. Wild ones have very poor yields like oldmansmith said. Also look for someone with Llama manure. Its the best fertilizer I've found for berries. After transplanting water them very well. I don't usually suggest mulching around berries since mulch often can attract bugs, especially ants, who will devour your berries.

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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    Just a word to the wise where raspberries are concerned ... they spread. And they're a royal pain in the ass. Berries are soft, so they're easy for bugs and birds to get there ahead of you, and if you're a day late, they're like trying to pick jam. Tug on one that's not quite ripe and 10 ripe ones that you haven't gotten yet fall off, and land down where you can't get at them. Whatever you do, keep them in narrow rows. If they manage to get a few plants deep, getting to those behind is like sticking your hand into a wasp nest.
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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    Quote Originally Posted by Professur View Post
    Just a word to the wise where raspberries are concerned ... they spread. And they're a royal pain in the ass. Berries are soft, so they're easy for bugs and birds to get there ahead of you, and if you're a day late, they're like trying to pick jam. Tug on one that's not quite ripe and 10 ripe ones that you haven't gotten yet fall off, and land down where you can't get at them. Whatever you do, keep them in narrow rows. If they manage to get a few plants deep, getting to those behind is like sticking your hand into a wasp nest.
    Agree!

    Had an old friend that grew black/raspberries and he did it two ways, one is along privacy fence lines and trained the plants to grow up and along the fence tying the runners to nails in the wall. The other way was to use stakes and chicken wire and make rows that he trained the plants to grow up and not sideways.

    Very easy to pick the berries without your hands turning into pincushions. (Mostly)!
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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldmansmith View Post
    My advice would be to transplant then when it is raining; they do no do well if their roots dry out at all. Mulch the area (mulching encourages suckering) and sprinkle any regular fertilizer around (10-10-10, etc).

    However, I would recommend that you buy some rather than using the wild ones; the yield is much, much heavier. My yard is full of all kinds (I'm a raspberry nut, I fill my freezer every year). I have wild ones, regular ones, and everbearers. An everbearer like "Heritage" is great because they don't need staking, and you can get two crops per year or, if you are lazy, mow them all to the ground in winter and you get one big crop in the fall.

    Raspberries give you more bang for your buck than pretty much anything. My friend makes raspberry wine and it is the best homemade wine ever!
    I've had trouble getting plants from local nurseries--not sure if it's an abundance of demand or a lack of supply, or both--which is why I thought that transplanting these bushes would be the next best thing. I figure it's better than no bushes at all.

    Just curious, what happens if I don't trim the bushes down after I plant them? And is there anything else I SHOULDN'T do when/after planting them?
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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    As with most cases of transplanting, when you dig the plant up, you leave alot of the root system behind. The logic of trimming back is to compensate for that because the plant root system needs to adapt to the new location and grow new roots. Trimming back the plant helps keep the overall strain/shock down and less plant for the damaged roots to try and support.
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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    Blackberries and raspberries know where they want to grow and will get there any way they can. I planted some in a bad spot, south side of house (too hot) and right at the drip line of the house, so they couldn't spread much because it was too dry. They did ok for a couple years and then just died off. Now I have volunteers growing on the noth side of the house, doing very well with no help at all and I can't get rid of them. Makes the front of the house look a little unkept. But I'm not too upset - especially now when they are just about ready to pick.....

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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    Man tazed in the blueberries while stealing shrubs.

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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    Another reason why I was thinking that wild berries would be better than "domesticated" ones is that I've heard that the flavor and hardiness of wild berries is typically better--but maybe not always? Other than possible yield, are there other advantages to planting store-bought plants instead of transplanting wild ones?
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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    Quote Originally Posted by Nickelless View Post
    Another reason why I was thinking that wild berries would be better than "domesticated" ones is that I've heard that the flavor and hardiness of wild berries is typically better--but maybe not always? Other than possible yield, are there other advantages to planting store-bought plants instead of transplanting wild ones?
    Flavor of the cultivars often surpasses the wild ones, or is at least equal to but 5 times as big. With wild raspberries, you will get fruit only on second year canes. If you have a hard winter (or a funny mild one like this last), many of the canes die over the winter. Everbearers will give you a fall crop even if they are all winter killed. If you have a mold problem (common in damp areas like New England), stout canes like "Heritage" don't need staking to stay off the ground.

    It is awfully late to be planting raspberries.

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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    Regardless of where you get your raspberry plants, if there are raccoons in the area, you better fence them good and add electric or the coons will wait until you think you have a nice crop and strip the whole patch. We have ours fenced that way and if we forget to turn on the electric, the coons will get in and in one night destroy the whole patch. Masked bandits is what they are. Mother nature dressed them up proper with that little mask. Deadly chicken thieves too. Feral cats are angels by comparison.
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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    I have actually bought frozen bags of them at the store and rototilled them still frozen into the ground and got tons of plants within a few years time.
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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    Quote Originally Posted by Nickelless View Post
    Another reason why I was thinking that wild berries would be better than "domesticated" ones is that I've heard that the flavor and hardiness of wild berries is typically better--but maybe not always? Other than possible yield, are there other advantages to planting store-bought plants instead of transplanting wild ones?
    Nick, We have both here. The store bought plants produce larger and more berries, but I personally like the wild ones, when I can beat the birds, raccoons and opossums to them. Bird netting works for the birds, but not the other vermin that prowl the edges in search of food. I've even seen fox squirrels go right through the wires to pick and eat black berries. fortunately, they are not real big and do not do the damage that possums and coons do.

    As for food value of the different kinds of raspberries, I don't think there is much other than taste and they all taste good - well good enough to eat, LOL!

    Long as you keep them well watered, it should be fine to transplant them almost anytime of year. Just don't expect a crop until next season as the berries should already be set on and you'll be trimming them back to just short canes if you are to be wanting the plant to survive. They do like partial shade but your soil should do, if it is near the right PH and moist enough so the plants do not dry out once mature. In the wild they seem to grow in just about any conditions, especially were there is a nearby tree or something a bird has sat and either dropped a berry or passed the seeds through it's digestion track. They will produce new plants from ripened berries, roots, and the tips of their canes coming in contact with the right ground conditions. They seem to grow like weeds on the edge of my field where woods and field meet. I have to watch not to mow them off this time of year because I like the berries as good as the rest of the family. I think raccoons and possums also pass the seeds in their scat, probably contributing to the berry bushes being found in some of the strangest locations. Dogs, foxes and coyotes will also eat the wild ones, so think of that too when you plant your berry bushes.
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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    Stark jealousy.

    Raspberries are my absolute fave. I LOVE them in stuffing. And on cereal. And by the handful. And... aw dang.

    They WILL NOT GROW down here in South Floriduh.

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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    just a tip on transplanting anything...

    transplanting is stressful... so, one little way of reducing the stress is...

    before you dig up the plant, tie a ribbon on a branch facing north, for instance...

    and when you replant it, point the ribbon in the same cardinal direction...

    ... so the plant will still "see" the sun rising & setting in the same direction...

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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    I opted for cultivated plants, and I'm hoping to get them in the ground tomorrow. I have two blackberry plants, three blueberry plants, a raspberry plant, a tayberry plant (a cross between a blackberry and a red raspberry) and a Concord grape start. I'll try to get my camera up and running and post a few photos in the next few days.
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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    I finally got 'em in the ground at about 3 a.m. this morning. The first photo is the blackberries, the second one is blueberries, the third one is Concord grapes, the fourth one is tayberries and the fifth one is raspberries.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails blackberry.jpg   blueberry.jpg  

    concordgrape.jpg   tayberry.jpg  

    raspberry.jpg  
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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    You planted grapes? Brave man. I've got an invasive wild grape that I've been trying to kill off for over 10 years ... it's still shooting everywhere. A friend went a little nuts and tried to pull up roots ... left a 12' line across my yard before he gave up.
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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    Quote Originally Posted by Professur View Post
    You planted grapes? Brave man. I've got an invasive wild grape that I've been trying to kill off for over 10 years ... it's still shooting everywhere. A friend went a little nuts and tried to pull up roots ... left a 12' line across my yard before he gave up.
    Well, when life gives you grapes...

    Just curious, how's the fruit yield from the vines in your yard?
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    Default Re: Advice on transplanting wild berry bushes

    Quote Originally Posted by Nickelless View Post
    Well, when life gives you grapes...

    Just curious, how's the fruit yield from the vines in your yard?
    Zero. The grapes it produces are about the size of blueberries, and so sour even the birds don't like them. But growth rates rival Kudzu. Easily a foot a week in the summer. 5 years with only minimal support and it's an impenetrable barrier. My soil is a heavy clay with insane water retention . I'll say this tho .. any bug that even thinks about coming into my yard heads straight for it, and leaves everything else alone. Raspberries, gooseberries, strawberries ... even the roses. The labybugs literally feast in that thing, and the spiders would give you nightmares if that sort of thing bothered you.

    I'm told the leaves are useful for cooking, but I've never been bold enough to do anything with them.
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