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Beer

Discussion in 'Survival (Preps & Homestead)' started by northfarmer, Jan 8, 2012.



  1. northfarmer

    northfarmer Seeker Seeker

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    When you add in the calories and carbs and number of bottles you can make out of a bushel of barley

    you could pretty well justify this as a real post shtf must.

    Plus being a little bit hammered might be a good thing.
     
  2. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Modal Operator/Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    It's traditional...

    Beer is God's way of telling us that he loves us and wants us to be happy -- Benjamin Franklin.
     
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  3. smooth

    smooth Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    great for barter! but takes up alot of room... in a real SHTF whiskey would be like gold.:s13:
     
  4. Solo

    Solo Midas Member Midas Member

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    If you have the supplies and know-how, than being able to brew beer would certainly do a lot for your mental health IMO:yes:. Can you store barley and hops longterm without losing flavor though? In other words, would it taste any good with 2+ year old grains? I would assume if they're stored properly it would, but I don't know much about making beer. I know a lot about drinking it though :p:cool:...

    Obviously it's not a SHTF barter good. That's why everyone should keep a case of vodka fifths on hand. With vodka you an antiseptic and mental health aid too...
     
  5. smooth

    smooth Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    if one was able to brew beer during SHTF it could definately be used for barter.
     
  6. gnome

    gnome Gold Chaser Platinum Bling

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    North, I agree totally. For centuries beer was a form of bread that didn't grow mold. Good beers actually age well, crap in a can does not. Bottles will take up a lot of space, kegs much more efficient.
     
  7. Fiat Metaler

    Fiat Metaler Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    barley has to be malted before you make beer from it. malting is basically the process of allowing the seed grain to begin to germinate, then halting the germination and harvesting the sugars.

    you can buy condensed barley malt in a can. a can half the size of a no. 10 can can make about 5 gallons of beer. the yeast and hops you can get pulverized that will keep in a small plastic bag the size of a tiny envelope.

    beer is pretty easy to make and much easier than distilling liquor.
     
  8. horseman1

    horseman1 New Member

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    Right on Fiat Metaler. The malted barley contains enzymes that will break down the starches in the grains and convert them to sugars. Some fermentable and some not. Some varieties of malted barley have more of these enzymes than others. The process of using the enzymes to convert the starches to sugars is called mashing. Not that I have ever done anything like this before :).
     
  9. stAGgering

    stAGgering Seeker Seeker

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    Mead/beer was a mainstay in Atlantic crossings as food/water.
    History recorded the beer preference, due to diseases transfered in water or mishandling of containers for centuries.
    You all heard, frog in the bucket dead, do not drink it.
    In the process of making beer/mead the water is made safe to consume. Except if poured into pewter with lead.
    During the same time "born with a silver spoon" was created. Also due to poor hygiene of the "poor." The wealthy child eating from silverware had a lower chance of death due to silver's antiseptic properties.

    Some historical facts for health concerned beer making justification. AArrGGGhhhh! MATIES! She's me keg!
     
  10. spacecase0

    spacecase0 Seeker Seeker

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    don't forget to use the used mash to feed your farm animals
     
  11. Unclad Lad

    Unclad Lad Rhodium Imam Gold Chaser

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    On the contrary, a cask of beer (or a quart of spirits) take up a lot less room than a bushel of barley. It also stores longer, is mostly vermin-proof, and sells for a higher price.
     
  12. gringott

    gringott Killed then Resurrected Midas Member Site Supporter

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    When I was quite young a pretty neighbor widow lady married an ex-GI. He shipped a huge quantity of bottled beer from Germany when he came back. He stored it in the basement. How do I know this? Because cases of it were out on the street for the garbage man as they were "spoiled". I remember seeing large white blobs in the bottles. Wouldn't this happen to homemade brew as well?
     
  13. Fiat Metaler

    Fiat Metaler Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    my understanding was that the natural process of a seed beginning to germinate releases the enzymes and converts the starches to sugar. the process of forcing germination to accomplish this result is called malting. plain old yeast can then process the simple sugars into alcohol and C02.

    some craft brewers begin with malted grains and seep the grains at precise temperatures (mashing). they do this instead of starting with pre-packaged malt syrup. a lot more work, more difficult to execute, and takes up more space.

    correct me if i a wrong, but the important point is that the germination transforms the starches to sugars, not the mashing or fermenting. so if you are stocking up for SHTF, you needed malted grains, not regular grains.

    if you want to keep it simple, just stock up on cans of malted barley or wheat extract from a home brewing supply company. relax, dont worry, have a homebrew.
     
  14. Unca Walt

    Unca Walt Midas Member Midas Member

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    Beer, like gasoline or soda pop, has a limited shelf life.

    Gotta drink it. (The beer, that is.) :s13:

    Your ex-GI innocently (naively?) walked right into a problem: Shipping. Alla way from Germany? That means it prolly came by boat. ("Huge" quantity...) If the beer was just put in crates, it got ruined right then and there. GOTTA have refrigeration.

    Here is the skinny on shelf life:

    The length of time it takes for a beer to become stale (a papery note, dulled hop character, or other off flavors) is determined by the alcoholic strength and hopping level of the beer. Both alcohol and hops help preserve beer. Thus hoppier, stronger beers keep for longer. Typically, the freshness period for a lager is four months; for stronger craft-brewed ales, five months. High-gravity, high-strength beers such as doppelbocks typically carry a six- to twelve-month freshness period.

    All of the preceding assumes proper handling of the beer. And being on the deck of a container ship just aint. It was garbage by the time it arrived in the US.
     
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  15. DodgebyDave

    DodgebyDave Metal Messiah Midas Member

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    A flat beer from Germany is still a million times more of a beer than Budweiser piss water.

    Besides that, Air Freight! (I get my St. Nickolaus fresh thanks to the US Chair Force)
     
  16. funk

    funk Seeker Seeker

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    Beer is good, but would be difficult to properly make once the SHTF, given the cooking, ingredients and process. Corn licker on the other can be made with sprouted corn, left to ferment via wild yeast. Once distilled in can be used for drinkin, antiseptic or molotov cocktails. The process is not the least bit complicated, once you know whats going on.

    Build a still and plant a few rows of feed corn.

    That my friends, will be the ticket should things go down hard. IMHO
     
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  17. coopersmith

    coopersmith for fuck sake.......... Silver Miner

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    I couldnt agree more, and have been preparing accordingly.

    www.hillbillystills.com
    www.coppermoonshinestills.com
    http://homedistiller.org/forum/index.php

    DUCK, you got screwed on that still setup you ordered. Its tiny and overpriced.
     
  18. Argentium

    Argentium Midas Member Midas Member

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    I understand what you're saying, but from a historical perspective, humans managed to produce fermented beverages (beer and wine) from ~ 5000 BC, whereas distilling didn't happen until ~800 AD or so. At least that is the accepted history. What I get from that is, fermented alcoholic beverages are simpler to produce than distilled ones and requires a lower level of technology/know-how.
     
  19. funk

    funk Seeker Seeker

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    Any liquid with sugar in it will ferment once active yeast is introduced. Take a bottle of Welches grape juice, and a pack of Fleishmans yeast and in a few days you will have a fermented beverage. Nasty but it'll get ya drunk. While distillation is one extra step, the benefit is condensed alcohol content. Personally I would rather have a gallon of 80% than a gallon of 6%.
     
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  20. Fiat Metaler

    Fiat Metaler Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    agreed. homebrewing beer is a labor of love and is not "worth" the inputs in terms of time, energy, and money.

    distilling can be more efficient in terms of time, money and energy but requires more equipment and the authorities frown on it.
     
  21. horseman1

    horseman1 New Member

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    Mashing allows the enzymes in the malt (germinated seeds) to break down the starches in the grains into sugars. All grain brewers use this process. The enzymes are activated at different temperatures. There are several good web sites that describe the process. The Complete Joy of Home Brewing by Charlie Papazian (Where the quote you used comes from) has a great chapter on the enzymes and the mashing process.

    You and Charlie P have it right : Relax, don't worry, have a homebrew. If you had a homebrew every time he told you to in that book, you wouldn't be able to read it :)
     
  22. graspAU

    graspAU Seeker Seeker

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    I agree, beer is too bulky for SHTF trade, store some vodka and whiskey.
     
  23. Brio

    Brio Midas Member Midas Member

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  24. Gold Rules

    Gold Rules Gold Member Gold Chaser

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  25. Fiat Metaler

    Fiat Metaler Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    I read Charlies' book over 20 years ago and nearly opened a brew pub.
     
  26. nickndfl

    nickndfl Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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  27. brosil

    brosil Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    Let's not forget mead in all this. A beekeeper can be very popular with a little equipment.
     
  28. AG_Glock

    AG_Glock New Member

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    Just purchase bulk DME (dry malt extract), some hop plugs and yeast. Add a little sugar for priming the bottles (needed for carbonation) and you are set. Making beer is incredibly easy...making great tasting beer is a science.
     
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  29. Ensoniq

    Ensoniq Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    I'm hooked on the quad and triple ales from Belgium

    Just a personal confession, carry on
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2016
  30. mtnman

    mtnman Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    Beer, the raw material used to make Whiskey. First you make a beer then you distill that beer.
     
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  31. slackercruster

    slackercruster Seeker Seeker

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    I was thinking about doing beer. All the store-bought crap is pasteurized. The young guns make al this flavored beer, can't seem to make great old time plain beer. I made natural wine (plum, blackberry, blueberry) with airborne yeast,. Worked great!
     
  32. Ensoniq

    Ensoniq Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    Right

    Right after my 100 case stash is exhausted I'll get right on that ;)
     
  33. Unca Walt

    Unca Walt Midas Member Midas Member

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    I used to make my own beer. It had a real downside: it was so good, I put on weight.
     
  34. Professur

    Professur Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter

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    I see a lot of opinions .. but how many here have actually tried SHTF brewing? Forget stores, we're talking sustainable.
     
  35. Aurumag

    Aurumag Seeker of Truth and Justice Midas Member

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    Beer is money.

    Bread and Beer
    Subsistence workers in ancient Egypt were sometimes paid in bread and beer, two staples of the Egyptian diet. Bread and beer acted as rations to feed poor workers, although there are cases in the Middle Kingdom of highly paid workers earning several hundred loaves of bread per day. Uniformity of value was important in the bread and beer currency, with standard sizes for beer jars and bread loaves baked from a standard recipe with uniform nutritional value.

    Ancient Egyptian Alcohol

    Beer [​IMG] [​IMG][​IMG]


    • The mouth of a perfectly contented man is filled with beer.

      -- 2200 BC inscription
      [She] sent you to school when you were ready to be taught writing, and she waited for you daily at home with bread and beer.

      -- Instructions of Ani, regarding his mother
    Beer, called hqt by the ancients and zythus by the Greeks, was a very important Egyptian drink. It was a drink for adults and children alike. It was the staple drink of the poor (wages were sometimes paid in beer), it was a drink of the rich and wealthy, and a drink offered to the gods and placed in the tombs of the dead.



    • Beer in the morning, beer in the afternoon and beer at night. A little wine thrown in for good measure. And after a hard day of cutting stones for the pharaoh, time and energy left for a bit of hanky-panky.
    Workmen at the pyramids of the Giza Plateau were given beer, thrice daily - five kinds of beer and four kinds of wine were found by archaeologists "poking through dumps, examining skeletons, probing texts and studying remains of beer jars, and wine vats" at Giza.


    • In 1990, the Egyptian Exploration Society approached Scottish and Newcastle Breweries for help. This was the beginning of a partnership which, over the past five years, has considerably increased the understanding of the brewing process as it was at the time of Tutankhamun.
    Beer was depicted on the walls of the tombs, as were scenes of the ancient Egyptian brewery. It was probably very similar to the way beer is still produced in Sudan today. Traditionally, beer was regarded as a female activity as it was an off-shoot of bread making - the basis of the beer were loaves of specially made bread.

    [​IMG]

    Most likely, the beer was not very intoxicating, nutritious, sweet, without bubbles, and thick (the beer had to be strained with wooden syphons, used as a straw, because it was filled with impurities). Though the later Greek accounts suggest that the beer, instead, was as intoxicating as the strongest wine, and it is clear that the worshipers of Bast , Sekhmet and Hathor got drunk on beer as part of their worship of these goddesses, because of their aspect of the Eye of Ra. Tenenit was another ancient Egyptian goddess of beer.


    • Broadly speaking, the established view of ancient Egyptian brewing, drawn from tomb scenes, is as follows. Beer loaves were made from a richly yeasted dough. Malt may or may not have been used. This dough was lightly baked and the resulting bread was crumbled and strained through a sieve with water. Ingredients like dates or extra yeast might have been added. The dissolved mixture was fermented in large vats and then the liquid was decanted into jars which were sealed for storage or transport.
    There is a lot missing, but an important question is what did the beer taste like? Thanks to the work done by the Egyptian Exploration Society and the Scottish and Newcastle Breweries, the ancient beer was probably "strongly influenced by the addition of fruit or spices as flavouring." The word 'bnr' [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]causes some problem - it is usually translated as 'date', but it may have referred to a different (or to any other) sweet-tasting food the Egyptians used in their beer. Although the dregs from ancient beer jars do show what ingredients were used, further work is needed before the exact flavour of the different beers can be established. In hieroglyphs, the

    determinative of the beer jug ([​IMG]) were used in words associated with beer - short for 'beer', 'tribute', 'to be drunk', 'food and drink' and 'butler'. The importance of beer in ancient Egypt can not be overlooked. 9 February 1996, the Herald-Sun reported that 'Tutankhamon Ale' will be based on sediment from jars found in a brewery housed in the Sun Temple of Nefertiti, and the team involved has gathered enough of the correct raw materials to produce "just 1000 bottles of the ale".


    • "We are about to unveil a great Tutankhamon secret," said Jim Merrington, commercial director at Newcastle Breweries, "The liquid gold of the pharaohs. It's a really amazing inheritance they have left us, the origins of beer itself."
    ...

    Read more: http://www.touregypt.net/egypt-info/magazine-mag04012001-magf2.htm#ixzz4Jy42BaJS
     
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  36. Fiat Metaler

    Fiat Metaler Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    making your own beer is possible but its labor intensive. its worth doing if you don't have access to exotic microbrews where you live, or you want to be artisan. its not hard to do, and there are ways to do it with canned malt extracts that are pretty easy and then you can get more and more elaborate. Charlie Papazian wrote a book about this in the 70s called something like the art of homebrewing - get that book and some basic equipment, its all you need.

    as for airborne yeast, well you are more likely to have funky beer than something good tasting but the best beers in the world - belgian monk-brewed beers - are brewed with wild yeast.
     
  37. Ensoniq

    Ensoniq Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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  38. Professur

    Professur Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter

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    All beer started with wild yeast at one point in time. Just a matter of finding a good one and keeping it alive to do your bidding. You're farty little bacterial slave that poops joy and happiness. Most preppers already have some yeast cultures on hand for their needs. I'm not sure I'd want the same yeast working on my bread and beer ... but who knows?
     
  39. Unca Walt

    Unca Walt Midas Member Midas Member

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    Regarding the German beer vs Once Through The Buffalo Budweiser, an Oz buddy of mine made a somewhat similar comparison. (I used it in my last novel)

    "American beer is loik mykin love inna canoe: Fookin' near water!" :Happy:
     

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