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Dr Bones & Nurse Amy: The Survival Medicine Hour Of Doom & Bloom

Discussion in 'Survival (Preps & Homestead)' started by searcher, Mar 16, 2014.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Dr Bones & Nurse Amy: The Survival Medicine Hour Of Doom & Bloom

    In this episode of the Doom and Bloom(tm) Survival Medicine Hour, Joe Alton, M.D. and Amy Alton, A.R.N.P. discuss currents events as well as outside-the-box medicinal uses for honey, drought in California and the risk to Salmon fisheries, and much more...doomandbloom.net
    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/surviv...survival-medicine-hour-honey-drought-and-more


    Here's a link to The Survival Medicine / Doom & Bloom web site
    http://www.doomandbloom.net/
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Stab Wounds Part 1 with Dr. Bones

    [video=youtube_share;IvRLL1ZdfL8]http://youtu.be/IvRLL1ZdfL8[/video]

    http://youtu.be/IvRLL1ZdfL8

    Published on Nov 14, 2014
    Injuries involving stab wounds and hemorrhage are discussed in part 1 of this series. Learn how to deal with penetrating wounds. www.DoomandBloom.Net ,Joseph Alton, M.D. discusses how to keep your family safe in life-threatening situations.
     
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Stab Wounds Part 2 with Dr. Bones

    [video=youtube_share;S_P2SX8a8GE]http://youtu.be/S_P2SX8a8GE[/video]

    http://youtu.be/S_P2SX8a8GE

    Published on Nov 14, 2014
    Treatment involving stab wounds and hemorrhage are discussed in part 2 of this series. Learn how to deal with non-perferating wounds. www.DoomandBloom.Net ,Joseph Alton, M.D. discusses how to keep your family safe in life-threatening situations.
     
  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Civil Liberties vs Public Health

    [video=youtube_share;pHZtA9D4O6g]http://youtu.be/pHZtA9D4O6g[/video]

    http://youtu.be/pHZtA9D4O6g

    Published on Nov 19, 2014

    The battle between civil liberties and public health is discussed by Joe Alton, M.D. Quarantines, immunizations and other public safety measures have created battles during smallpox, measles, tuberculosis and now ebola outbreaks. www.DoomandBloom.Net
     
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    How to Suture with Dr Bones

    [video=youtube_share;5GlkuxNdTgc]http://youtu.be/5GlkuxNdTgc[/video]

    http://youtu.be/5GlkuxNdTgc

    Uploaded on Sep 21, 2011

    Learn how to suture with Dr Bones from The Doom and Bloom (tm) Show. Using a pig's foot he shows you how to cut an incision, apply anteseptic, insert the sutures, tie a proper instrument knot, cut the extra sutures and how to space the sutures for good wound closure. See www.DoomandBloom.net for more collapse medicine preparedness information.
     
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  7. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Honey Is Medicine by Nurse Amy from DoomandBloom.net

    [video=youtube_share;-329kswGCHA]http://youtu.be/-329kswGCHA[/video]

    http://youtu.be/-329kswGCHA

    Published on Aug 4, 2013
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Concussions with Dr. Bones

    [video=youtube_share;VYD1IzAO2oo]http://youtu.be/VYD1IzAO2oo[/video]

    http://youtu.be/VYD1IzAO2oo

    Published on Dec 10, 2014

    Concussions can be serious injuries. Learn about the symptoms, side effects and treatment. Prevention is the key to avoiding concussions and their possible long-term effects. http://www.doomandbloom.net/
     
  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Burn Treatment Part 1 Survival Medicine by Nurse Amy

    [video=youtube_share;BGyXV9TSboI]http://youtu.be/BGyXV9TSboI[/video]

    http://youtu.be/BGyXV9TSboI

    Published on Mar 14, 2012
    Learn how to treat burns with traditional and natural remedies. For more information, www.DoomandBloom.net, to see medical preparedness, natural remedies and organic gardening articles. We also have a new book the Doom and Bloom(tm) Survival Medicine Handbook and medical supplies in the Doom and Bloom Store.Part 1 discusses first degree burns, part 2 is about second degree burnsThanks! Nurse Amy


    Burn Treatment Part 2 Survival Medicine by Nurse Amy

    [video=youtube_share;vSBk0fCvVNA]http://youtu.be/vSBk0fCvVNA[/video]

    http://youtu.be/vSBk0fCvVNA


    Published on Mar 15, 2012

    Learn how to treat a second degree burns using traditional and natural remedies. For more information on medical preparedness and more see www.DoomandBloom.NET. This information is for educational purposes only. If a medical system exists, please seek immediate emergency treatment of large or deep burns. Infection, shock and swelling are serious conditions that require the best medical attention available. Thanks, Nurse Amy
     
  11. searcher

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    Hypothermia with Dr. Bones

    [video=youtube_share;GvgN1E2W81A]http://youtu.be/GvgN1E2W81A[/video]

    http://youtu.be/GvgN1E2W81A

    Published on Dec 13, 2014

    Hypothermia signs and symptoms, treatment and prevention. Winter is not the only time hypothermia can occur.
     
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  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Hypothermia with Dr. Bones

    [video=youtube_share;GvgN1E2W81A]http://youtu.be/GvgN1E2W81A[/video]

    http://youtu.be/GvgN1E2W81A

    Published on Dec 13, 2014

    Hypothermia signs and symptoms, treatment and prevention. Winter is not the only time hypothermia can occur
     
  13. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  14. searcher

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    [h=3]Survival Medicine Hour: Chest Pain, Acid, Spirituality, More[/h]
    December 20, 2014



    [​IMG]


    In the latest episode of the Doom and Bloom(tm) Survival Medicine Hour, the Altons, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy, discuss spirituality and its role in survival, cardiac and non-cardiac causes of chest pain (including acid reflux and ulcers), and more. To listen in, click the link below:

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/surviv...cine-hour-chest-pain-acid-reflux-spirituality

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad…
    Joe and Amy Alton
     
  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [h=3]The Role of Spirituality in Survival[/h]
    December 23, 2014



    [​IMG]

    It’s the Christmas season, and we wanted to take a second to talk about the role that spirituality has in survival. Survival certainly involves having a plan for your physical self, food, water, shelter, but one of the most important things you can do to be ready for the uncertain future is to have your spiritual self in order.

    Many people in our world judge success by the amount of stuff they’re accumulated. Well, that’s all well and good, but like Ebenezer Scrooge learned in Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol”, physical riches matter little if you haven’t done your part to make the WORLD richer for having been in it.

    If you can do that, then you’ll be a wealthy man or woman: Wealthy in spirit. Those are the kind of riches that will get you through the toughest times.

    We always talk about the importance of education and training to your success when everything else fails, but you don’t have to be a pastor to see the benefits of faith. POW’s in Vietnam tell stories about how their spirituality gave them a sense of hope in what most would deem a hopeless situation.

    It’s that sense of hope that will strengthen your resilience in times of trouble, whether it’s a natural disaster, an economic collapse, or a personal tragedy. If it can be instilled in a group of people under adverse circumstances, they might just keep it together, even when everything else falls apart.

    Dr. Bones and I would like to wish you and your family a Merry Christmas and the happiest and healthiest of New Year’s. Thanks so much for your support, and we hope that we can continue to be of service to the preparedness community for many years.

    Amy Alton


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/the-role-of-spirituality-in-survival/
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Altitude Sickness with Dr. Bones

    [video=youtube_share;0ND6BaJvTv0]http://youtu.be/0ND6BaJvTv0[/video]

    http://youtu.be/0ND6BaJvTv0

    Published on Dec 31, 2014

    Altitude sickness is a real possibilty when travelling fast to a much higher altitude. Joe Alton, M.D. discusses prevention, symptoms and treatment. http://www.doomandbloom.net/
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Survival Medicine Hour: Tourniquets, New Viruses, Antibiotics


    January 3, 2015



    [​IMG]
    SOF-T Tourniquet

    In this episode of the Doom and Bloom ™ Survival Medicine Hour, the Altons discuss the viral illness that rages on in the Caribbean and South America, with 2000 U.S. cases in 2014: Chikungunya Virus. Also, Dr. Bones (Joe Alton, M.D.) discusses new thinking about tourniquets as well as the important survival antibiotic Metronidazole (Fish-Zole).

    [​IMG]

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/surviv...cine-hour-chikungunya-antibiotics-tourniquets

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,

    Joe and Amy Alton
     
  20. searcher

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    Diarrhea Treatment


    January 5, 2015



    [​IMG]



    Diarrhea in Survival

    With worsening sanitation and hygiene, there will likely be an increase in infectious disease, many of which cause diarrhea. Diarrhea is defined as frequent loose bowel movements. If a person has 3 liquid stools in a row, it’s important to watch for signs of dehydration. Diarrhea lasting less than three weeks is usually related to an infection, and is known as Acute Diarrhea. Chronic Diarrhea lasts longer than three weeks and is more likely related to disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome.

    Diarrhea, generally, is a common ailment which should go away on its own with attention to rehydration methods. In aome circumstances, however, diarrhea can be a life-threatening condition. Over 80,000 soldiers perished in the Civil War, not from bullets, but from dehydration related to diarrheal disease.

    Common causes of diarrhea are:


    • Bacterial infections caused by food or water contamination, such as Salmonella, Shingella, E. Coli and Campylobacter
    • Viral Infections like rotavirus, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, Norwalk virus
    • Food Intolerances or Allergies, such as lactose intolerance and seafood allergies
    • Medication Reactions, like antibiotics, laxatives
    • Parasites, such as Cryptosporidium, Entamoeba and Giardia
    • Chronic Intestinal diseases
    • Overeating heavy greasy foods or unripe fruit



    Danger Symptoms of Diarrhea

    In most cases, diarrhea will resolve itself simply by staying hydrated and staying away from solid food for 6-12 hours. However, there are some symptoms that may present in association with diarrhea that can be a sign of something more serious. Those symptoms are:


    • Fever equal to or greater than 101 degrees Fahrenheit
    • Bloody, mucus, or frothy yellow stool
    • Black or grey-white stool
    • Severe vomiting
    • Major abdominal distension and pain
    • Moderate to severe dehydration, which is not getting better
    • Diarrhea lasting more than 3 days in adults
    • Diarrhea lasting more than 1 day in children and the sick or elderly
    • In children also, abdominal pain causing crying for over 2 hours

    All of the above may be signs of serious infection, intestinal bleeding, liver dysfunction, or even surgical conditions such as appendicitis. As well, all of the above will increase the likelihood that the person affected won’t be able to regulate their fluid balance.

    The end result (and most common cause of death) of untreated diarrheal illness is dehydration. 75% of the body’s weight is made up of water; the average adult requires 2 to 3 liters of fluid per day to remain in balance. Children become dehydrated more easily than adults: 4 million children die every year in underdeveloped countries from dehydration due to diarrhea and other causes.


    [​IMG]
    Tea and Honey for Diarrhea Treatment

    Rehydration Treatment for Diarrhea


    Fluid replacement is the treatment for dehydration caused by diarrhea. Oral rehydration is the first line of treatment, but if this fails, intravenous fluid (IV) may be needed, which requires special skills. Always start by giving your patient small amounts of clear fluids.

    For pediatric diarrhea, the problem can become life threatening much faster. Be diligent in fluid replacement and continue breast-feeding if the infant is still nursing. Do not use watered down fruit juices or Gatorade products for these infants or children. The best fluid replacement according to one study called Evaluation of Infant Rehydration Solutions, by James F. Wesley, states, “The most appropriate product would have an acceptable taste and a hypotonic osmolality. That would be unflavored Gerber Liquilyte.” http://osmolality.com/pdf/InfantRehydrate.pdf

    Oral rehydration packets are commercially available, but you can produce your own homemade rehydration fluid very easily: For adults use 1 liter of water, and for children use 2 liters of water, then add:


    • 6-8 teaspoons of sugar (sucrose)
    • 1 teaspoon of salt (sodium chloride)
    • ½ teaspoon of salt substitute (potassium chloride)
    • A pinch of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate)

    As the patient shows an ability to tolerate these fluids, advancement of the diet is undertaken. It is wise to avoid milk, as some are lactose intolerant. A popular strategy for rapid recovery from dehydration is the BRAT diet, used commonly in children. This diet consists of:


    • Bananas
    • Rice
    • Applesauce
    • Plain Toast (or crackers)


    Once the patient keeps down thin cereals, you can add more solid foods. Additional energy needs may be met with these foods, as the patient gets better:


    • Brown Rice water
    • Chicken or Beef broth, with rice or noodles
    • Oatmeal or grits
    • Boiled eggs
    • Boiled potatoes
    • Baked Chicken
    • Vegetable broth with very soft carrots, potatoes
    • Jell-O
    • Organic Yogurt for probiotics after diarrhea stops

    The advantage of this strategy is that these food items are very bland, easily tolerated, and slow down intestinal motility (the rapidity of movement of food/fluids through your system). This will slow down diarrhea and, as a result, water loss. In a survival setting, you will probably not have many bananas, but hopefully you have stored rice and/or applesauce, and have the ability to bake bread.


    Various natural substances have been reported to be helpful in these situations. Herbal remedies that are thought to help with diarrhea include:



    • Ginger (fresh is best)
    • Meadowsweet (mild and highly recommended)
    • Blackberry leaf
    • Raspberry leaf
    • Chamomile
    • Peppermint
    • Goldenseal
    • Sunflower leaf
    • Garden Sage
    • Yarrow
    • Mullein
    • Nettle
    • Slippery Elm
    • Oak Bark (very strong, last resort)


    Make a tea (infusion) by pouring 1 cup of boiling water over 1-2 teaspoon of dried herbs and let them brew with a lid for 10-15 minutes, strain, then drink a cup every 2-3 hours, or until the patient feels better. A small amount of raw honey may be added for taste and a pinch of cinnamon.

    Half a clove of fresh crushed garlic and 1 teaspoon of raw, unprocessed honey 3-4 times a day is thought to exert an antibacterial effect in some cases of diarrhea. A small amount of nutmeg may decrease the number of loose bowel movements.

    Of course, there are medicines that can help and you should stockpile these in quantity. Pepto-Bismol and Imodium (Loperamide) will help stop diarrhea. They don’t cure infections, but they will slow down the number of bowel movements and conserve water. These are over the counter medicines, and are easy to obtain. In tablet form, these medicines will last for years if properly stored. Don’t use medication as a first option; some causes of diarrhea are made worse with these medications.

    There are some theories about creating homemade IV solutions. This is problematic and all the obstacles cannot be overcome. How do you make a 100% sterile solution that is exactly normal saline, get it into a sterile bag/delivery system and keep it 100% sterile in the process? You’ll also need a tubing system, which must also be sterile, to an I.V. catheter, which must be sterile until used. A standard IV bag is created in a specialized environment and remains sterile until punctured by a sterile (hopefully) tubing. Any exposure to the air will eliminate the sterility, which means that it is possible that you might be infusing bacteria directly into your patient’s bloodstream, a very bad idea.

    As a last resort to treat dehydration from diarrhea (especially if there is also a high fever), you can try antibiotics or anti-parasitic drugs. Ciprofloxacin, Doxycycline and Metronidazole are good choices, twice a day, until the stools are less watery. Some of these are available in veterinary form without a prescription (discussed later in this book). These medicines should be used only as a last resort, as the main side effect is usually…diarrhea!

    http://www.doomandbloom.net/diarrhea_treatment/
     
  21. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Frostbite and Immersion (Trench) Foot



    January 7, 2014



    [​IMG]


    FROSTBITE AND IMMERSION FOOT


    Exposure to cold may lead to injuries such as Frostbite and Immersion (Trench) Foot. The focus of survival medical training should be general, but also take into account the type of environment that you expect to live in if a disaster occurs. If you live in Miami, it’s unlikely you’ll be treating a lot of people with hypothermia. If you live in Siberia, it’s unlikely you’ll be treating a lot of people with heat stroke. Learn how to treat the likely medical issues for the area and situation that you expect to find yourself in.

    One major environmental risk is the effect of ambient temperature. Humans tolerate a very narrow range and are susceptible to damage as a result of being too cold or too hot. Your body has various methods it uses to control its internal “core” temperature, either raising it or lowering it to appropriate levels. The body “core“ refers to the major internal organ systems that are necessary to maintain life, such as your brain, heart, liver, and others. The remainder (your skin, muscles and extremities) is referred to as the “periphery”.

    It’s been a harsh winter, with storms buffeting the Midwest and Northeast in the last few weeks. Reading about deaths than occurred due to lack of preparedness, we wrote an article recently on general hypothermia. To read the article, click here: http://www.doomandbloom.net/cold-weather-preparedness/


    In general hypothermia, the body’s core temperature drops below 95 degrees F. There are cold-related injuries that occur in the periphery, however, and you might just encounter them if you’re on a winter hike or if there is a disaster-related grid shutdown.

    Two particularly difficult ones to deal with are Frostbite and Immersion (trench) Foot. Frostbite is the freezing of body tissues, and it usually occurs in the extremities, especially fingers and toes. Sometimes, the ears, nose, and even the lips may be affected.

    These conditions usually occur as a result of inadequately preparing for a trip in cold weather. If you expect to be outside for extended periods of time, dress warmly and consider what you would do for shelter and heat if you found yourself stranded somewhere. You could easily get lost during a hike in a snowstorm, have your car stall out, or other mishaps, so don’t feel that it couldn’t happen to you.

    Although I’ve mentioned this before, It may be useful to remember the simple acronym C.O.L.D. This stands for: Cover, Overexertion, Layering, and Dry:



    • Cover. Protect your head by wearing a hat. This will prevent body heat from escaping from your head. Instead of using gloves to cover your hands, use mittens. Mittens are more helpful than gloves because they keep your fingers in contact with one another. This conserves heat.
    • Overexertion. Avoid activities that cause you to sweat a lot. Cold weather causes you to lose body heat quickly, and wet, sweaty clothing accelerates the process. Rest when necessary; use rest periods to self-assess for cold-related changes. Pay careful attention to the status of your elderly or juvenile group members.
    • Layering. Loose-fitting, lightweight clothing in layers insulate you well. Use clothing made of tightly woven, water-repellent material for protection against the wind. Wool or silk inner layers hold body heat better than cotton does. Some synthetic materials work well, also. Especially cover the head, neck, hands and feet.
    • Dry. Keep as dry as you can. Get out of wet clothing as soon as possible. It’s very easy for snow to get into gloves and boots, so pay particular attention to your hands and feet.



    HOW TO IDENTIFY FROSTBITE AND IMMERSION FOOT (TRENCH FOOT)



    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    Frostbite is sometimes listed in stages, from minor “frostnip” to severe cases causing permanent loss of tissue. Initial symptoms of frostbite include a “pins and needles” sensation and numbness. Skin color changes from red to white to blue as the condition worsens. The skin will begin to harden and may feel “waxy” to the touch. If cold exposure continues, the color may change to black, indicating that a condition known as “gangrene” has set in. Gangrene is the death of tissue resulting from loss of circulation. This usually results in the loss of the body part affected. Infection may also set in, affecting the entire body. This is called “Sepsis” and is life-threatening.


    [​IMG]


    Immersion foot causes damage to nerves and small blood vessels due to prolonged immersion in cold water. This condition was previously called “Trench Foot”, as it was seen commonly in soldiers who spent long periods of time in the trenches of World War I. When seen in areas other than the feet, this condition is referred to as “chilblains”. Immersion foot appears similar to frostbite, but might have a more swollen or “juicy” appearance.

    HOW TO TREAT FROSTBITE AND IMMERSION FOOT

    The earlier that cold-related injuries are recognized and treated, the more likely the victim will recover without permanent damage. Frostbite or Immersion Foot is treated with a warm water (no more than 104 degrees F) soak of the affected areas. This is different from treatment of general hypothermia, which is best treated with warm DRY compresses in areas that effectively transport heat to the body core, such as the armpits, neck, and groin.


    Follow these tips when treating frostbite or immersion foot:


    1. Carefully monitor every member of your party for signs of frostbite in cold weather. If possible, get out of the cold and begin the rewarming process, even if it is just placing the victim’s hands in their armpits.
    2. Don’t allow thawed tissue to freeze again. The more often tissue freezes and thaws, the deeper the damage (think about what happens to a steak that goes from the freezer to outside and back again). If you can’t prevent your patient from being exposed to freezing temperatures again, you should wait before treating, but not more than 24 hours.
    3. Don’t rub or massage frostbitten tissue. Rubbing frostbitten tissue will result in damage to already injured tissues.
    4. Don’t use heat lamps or fires to treat frostbite. Your patient is numb and cannot feel the frostbitten tissue. As a result, significant burns can occur.

    Rapid action to rewarm cold-damaged tissues is the key to preventing long-term damage from exposure. Monitor your team members closely, and you’ll have the best change to succeed, even if everything else fails.

    Joe Alton, M.D., aka Dr. Bones the Disaster Doctor

    http://www.doomandbloom.net/frostbite-immersion-foot/
     
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  22. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Mass Casualty Incident- S.T.A.R.T. Triage Part 1

    [video=youtube_share;nF5fGclaxDs]http://youtu.be/nF5fGclaxDs[/video]

    http://youtu.be/nF5fGclaxDs

    Published on Jan 17, 2015

    The use of primary triage in mass casualty incidents is an efficient and safe method to give the most patients the best chance for survival. A process to sort patients and rank injuries when you as the medic are facing more than one patient in an emergency. Part 1 by Joseph Alton, M.D., aka Dr. Bones.
    http://www.doomandbloom.net/
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/survi...
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Survival Medicine Hour: Respiratory Infections, Black Scout Survival, more


    January 17, 2015



    [​IMG]

    In this episode of the Doom and Bloom(tm) Survival Medicine Hour, Nurse Amy, aka Amy Alton, A.R.N.P., interviews Jack of the popular Black Scout Survival Youtube channel, and Joe Alton, M.D., aka Dr.Bones, discusses colds, flus and pneumonias from both a traditional and an alternative standpoint in survival settings. Plus: Boko Haram, End of Ebola in Sight?, and more…



    To listen in, click below:


    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/surviv...r-respiratory-infections-black-scout-survival

    Wishing you the best of health in good times OR bad…Joe and Amy Alton
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Prepper Survival Community vs Lone Wolf Mindset

    [video=youtube_share;YoXP1PVdA00]http://youtu.be/YoXP1PVdA00[/video]

    http://youtu.be/YoXP1PVdA00

    Published on Jan 20, 2015

    The importance of prepper survival community is discussed by Joe Alton, M.D. Survival without other group members could spell disaster for your health. http://www.doomandbloom.net/
     
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    Teixobactin, A New Antibiotic


    January 20, 2015



    [​IMG]

    There is an epidemic that I’ve mentioned in past articles, and it’s spread to every continent: the epidemic of antibiotic resistance. Overuse of antibiotics in both humans and livestock (80% of antibiotics go to animals we eat) has resulted in drug-resistant strains of various microbes, including tuberculosis and salmonella.


    [​IMG]
    80% of antibiotics go to livestock


    In the last few years, no new antibiotics have come down the pipeline. Some current drugs are in their fourth generation, as pharmaceutical companies tweak existing medicines to gain time before the next resistant bug appears. This standstill bodes badly for a world that’s accustomed to technology moving at a faster pace every year. The era of totally drug resistant diseases may be dawning: A variant of tuberculosis in India that defies every method of treatment already exists.

    A rare bit of good news, however, on the antibiotic front is the discovery of the first truly new antibiotic in decades: Teixobactin. It wasn’t born in a laboratory; it was found in the dirt beneath your feet. Researchers have suspected that the soil’s bacteria might have much to teach us regarding how to fight disease. Different species of bacteria battle each other every day. Most bacteria, however, don’t grow well in laboratories.

    Now, the journal “Nature” reports that scientists have figured out how to grow previously un-culturable bacteria using an electronic “isolation chip”. They report that they have isolated a new antibiotic, Teixobactin, which they claim has no detectable resistance issues. It apparently works well against organisms that have become hardened to standard antibiotics, like Staph. Aureus and Tuberculosis.

    There are millions of uncultured bacteria in the soil that are yet to be grown and investigated. This new method of isolating these bacteria may lead to a number of new antibiotics. As well, other medicines for treatment against cancer, inflammation, and immune issues may one day be developed; it’s been described as the “tip of the iceberg”.


    [​IMG]
    tip of the iceberg?


    Teixobactin and other drugs are still in the FDA pipeline, so it’ll be a while before you’ll be given a prescription for it. Serious side effects have to be ruled out before it goes to the general public. Let’s hope that this new method will lead to more breakthroughs.


    Joe Alton, M.D.

    http://www.doomandbloom.net/teixoba...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
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    [h=3]Survival Medicine Hour: Alcohol, Sleep Deprivation, Escape and Evasion with Jack[/h]
    January 24, 2015



    [​IMG]


    In this episode of the Doom and Bloom™ Survival Medicine Hour, Joe and Amy Alton, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy, discuss the effects of alcohol, good and bad, on your health, sleep deprivation, new viruses on the horizon in West Africa, and basics of Escape and Evasion in Nurse Amy’s interview with Jack of Black Scout Survival, Part 2.


    To Listen in, click the link below:


    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/surviv...rivation-alcohol-escape-and-evasion-with-jack


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/surviva...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     
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    Cold Weather Preparedness



    January 2, 2014



    [​IMG]


    COLD WEATHER PREPAREDNESS


    It looks like another harsh winter, with ice storms and blizzards already carpeting much of the Midwest, Northeast and Canada, and cold weather preparedness is a must for survival. Failure to use precautions will lead to a condition called hypothermia.

    Hypothermia is a condition where the core body temperature drops below 95 degrees Fahrenheit. The normal body core temperature is defined as between 97.5-99.5 degrees Fahrenheit (36.0-37.5 degrees Celsius).

    In your efforts to be medically self-reliant, one of the major factors that must be taken into consideration is your environment. If you haven’t prepared for the weather, you have made your environment your enemy, and it is a formidable one. The last ice storm caused 27 deaths, some of which were avoidable. Therefore, it’s important to be prepared to prevent death from exposure and to know how to treat someone who is hypothermic.


    HOW YOUR BODY LOSES HEAT

    Your body has various methods it uses to control its internal “core” temperature, either raising it or lowering it to appropriate levels. The body “core“ refers to the major internal organ systems that are necessary to maintain life, such as your brain, heart, liver, and others.

    In cold weather, your blood vessels constrict to conserve heat. Muscles “shiver” as a method of heat production. You can voluntarily increase heat by exertion; it is recommended to “keep moving” in cold environments for this reason. Part of the healthcare provider’s role is to educate each and every member of their family or group on proper planning for outdoor activities. Monitor weather conditions as well as the people you’re sending out in the heat or cold.



    [​IMG]



    The body loses heat in various ways:

    Evaporation – the body perspires (sweats), which releases heat from the core.

    Radiation – the body loses heat to the environment anytime that the ambient (surrounding) temperature is below the core temperature (say, 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit). For example, you lose more heat if exposed to an outside temperature of 20 degrees F than if exposed to 80 degrees F.

    Conduction – The body loses heat when its surface is in direct contact with cold temperatures, as in the case of someone falling from a boat into frigid water. Water, being denser than air, removes heat from the body much faster.

    Convection – Heat loss where, for instance, a cooler object is in motion against the body core. The air next to the skin is heated and then removed, which requires the body to use energy to re-heat. Wind Chill is one example of air convection: If the ambient temperature is 32 degrees F but the wind chill factor is at 5 degrees F, you lose heat from your body as if it were actually 5 degrees F.

    Most heat is lost from the head area, due to its large surface area and tendency to be uncovered. Direct contact with anything cold, especially over a large area of your body, will cause rapid cooling of your body core temperature. The classic example of this would be a fall into cold water. In the Titanic sinking of 1912, hundreds of people fell into near-freezing water. Within 15 minutes, they were probably beyond medical help.


    PHYSICAL EFFECTS OF HYPOTHERMIA

    Aside from shivering, the most noticeable symptoms of hypothermia will be related to mental status. The person may appear confused, uncoordinated, and lethargic. As the condition worsens, speech may become slurred; the patient will appear apathetic and uninterested in helping themselves, or may fall asleep. This occurs due to the effect of cooling temperatures on the brain; the colder the body core gets, the slower the brain works. Brain function is supposed to cease at about 68 degrees Fahrenheit, although I have read of exceptional cases in which people (usually children) have survived even lower temperatures.

    To prevent hypothermia, you must anticipate the climate that you will be traveling through, including wind conditions and wet weather.

    Condition yourself physically to be fit for the challenge. Travel with a partner if at all possible, and have enough food and water available for the entire trip.


    PREVENTION STRATEGIES FOR HYPOTHERMIA

    In your efforts to be medically self-reliant, one of the major factors that must be taken into consideration is your environment. If you haven’t prepared for the weather, you have made your environment your enemy, and it is a formidable one.

    Remember the simple acronym C.O.L.D. This stands for: Cover, Overexertion, Layering, and Dry:

    Cover. Protect your head by wearing a hat. This will prevent body heat from escaping from your head. Instead of using gloves to cover your hands, use mittens. Mittens are more helpful than gloves because they keep your fingers in contact with one another. This conserves heat.

    Overexertion. Avoid activities that cause you to sweat a lot. Cold weather causes you to lose body heat quickly, and wet, sweaty clothing accelerates the process. Rest when necessary; use rest periods to self-assess for cold-related changes. Pay careful attention to the status of your elderly or juvenile group members.

    Layering. Loose-fitting, lightweight clothing in layers insulate you well. Use clothing made of tightly woven, water-repellent material for protection against the wind. Wool or silk inner layers hold body heat better than cotton does. Some synthetic materials work well, also. Especially cover the head, neck, hands and feet.

    Dry. Keep as dry as you can. Get out of wet clothing as soon as possible. It’s very easy for snow to get into gloves and boots, so pay particular attention to your hands and feet.

    Any unconscious person that you encounter in a cold environment is hypothermic until proven otherwise. Immediate action must be taken to reverse the ill effects.


    TREATMENT OF HYPOTHERMIA

    A person who is hypothermic is in danger of losing their life without your help. Important measures to take are:

    Get the person out of the cold and into a warm, dry location. If you’re unable to move the person out of the cold, shield him or her from the cold and wind as much as possible.

    Take off wet clothing. If the person is wearing wet clothing, remove them gently. Cover them with layers of dry blankets, including the head (leave the face clear). If you are outside, cover the ground to eliminate exposure to the cold surface.

    Monitor breathing. A person with severe hypothermia may be unconscious. Verify that the patient is breathing and check for a pulse. Begin CPR if necessary.

    Share body heat. To warm the person’s body, remove your clothing and lie next to the person, making skin-to-skin contact. Then cover both of your bodies with blankets. Some people may cringe at this notion, but it’s important to remember that you are trying to save a life. Gentle massage or rubbing may be helpful, but vigorous movements may traumatize the patient

    Give warm oral fluids. If the affected person is alert and able to swallow, provide a warm, nonalcoholic, non-caffeinated beverage to help warm the body. Remember, alcohol does not warm you up!



    [​IMG]



    Use warm, dry compresses
    . Use a first-aid warm compress (a fluid-filled bag that warms up when squeezed), or a makeshift compress of warm (not hot) water in a plastic bottle. Apply a compress only to the neck, chest wall or groin. These areas will spread the heat much better than putting warm compresses on the extremities, which sometimes worsens the condition.

    Avoid applying direct heat. Don’t use hot water, a heating pad or a heating lamp to warm the person. The extreme heat can damage the skin, cause strain on the heart or even lead to cardiac arrest. Don’t rub on extremities that may be frostbitten, as the skin is already traumatized and the condition may be worsened.

    Don’t give alcohol. You have all seen photos of St. Bernards with casks of brandy around their necks for lost alpine travelers. Alcohol may give you a warm and fuzzy feeling, but it also expands blood vessels, which causes heat loss!



    [​IMG]
    No Alcohol for Hypothermia! Bad Dog!



    If left untreated, hypothermia leads to complete failure of various organ systems and to death. Make sure your people are well clothed for the temperature, and monitor them closely if they are outside for extended periods of time in cold weather.

    Our next article will address specific cold weather issues, such as frostbite, immersion foot (trench foot), and falling into cold water.


    Joe Alton, M.D., aka Dr. Bones, the Disaster Doctor


    [​IMG]
    JOE ALTON, M.D., AKA DR. BONES
    CO-AUTHOR, THE SURVIVAL MEDICINE HANDBOOK



    http://www.doomandbloom.net/cold-weather-preparedness/
     
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    [h=3]Survival Medicine Hour: Masks, Measles, Natural Remedies for colds/flus[/h]
    January 31, 2015



    [​IMG]


    In this episode of the Survival Medicine Hour with Joe and Amy Alton, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy, the topics include all you need to know about face masks as medical supplies, measles as a survival infection, and natural remedies to deal with respiratory infections. To listen in, click the link below:


    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/surviv...-masks-measles-natural-remedies-for-coldsflus


    [​IMG]


    Wishing you the best of health in good times Or bad…


    Joe and Amy Alton

    http://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-masks-measles-natural-remedies-for-coldsflus/
     
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    [h=2]Survival Medicine Hour: Cholera, Measles and Civil Liberties[/h]
    February 7, 2015



    [​IMG]


    In the episode of the Doom and Bloom Survival Medicine Hour, Joe and Amy Alton, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy, discuss a third world disease that could become a major issue in an off-grid survival setting. Also, Dr. Alton takes on the controversial issue of vaccination policy as it pertains to Measles. When is it appropriate to curtail individual rights in the interest of public health and safety? To listen in, click the link below:


    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/surviv...cine-hour-cholera-measles-and-civil-liberties



    [​IMG]


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-cholera-measles-and-civil-liberties/
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    How to Grow Super Healthy Tomatoes in Containers: Using Organic Techniques

    [video=youtube_share;BDYNlJY8l7Y]http://youtu.be/BDYNlJY8l7Y[/video]

    http://youtu.be/BDYNlJY8l7Y

    Published on Feb 8, 2015
    Everything you need to know to harvest and grow healthy tomato plants in containers. Container size, soil, fertilizers, pest control, pollination, watering, sun requirements, vertical growing, and much more! Follow Nurse Amy as she walks you through her steps to success. http://www.doomandbloom.net/
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Who Was The First President?



    February 17, 2014




    [​IMG]
    John Hanson, President



    It’s Presidents’ Day in the U.S., and we celebrate the 43 men who have held the office, beginning with George Washington. However, was George Washington really the first President? Seems like the simplest question that even a kindergartener could answer, but it’s not exactly as clear-cut as you’d think.

    (As an aside, Barack Obama is the 44[SUP]th[/SUP] president, but the 43[SUP]rd[/SUP] man to hold the office, as Grover Cleveland’s two terms were not consecutive, making him both the 21[SUP]st[/SUP] and 23[SUP]rd[/SUP] President.)

    The United States declared its independence in 1776, but George Washington didn’t take office until 1789! So who was in charge of running the country until then? Naysayers say no one, but there were a number of patriots who had the title of president. The big question is, president of what?

    There were a number of Presidents of the Continental Congress, beginning with the man who signed his name in large script, John Hancock. But were the thirteen colonies now one country on July 4, 1776? Not officially. It wasn’t until the Articles of Confederation were signed in 1781 that we could say that the thirteen colonies were a new unified nation, the United States of America.

    The first man elected president under the Articles of Confederation (who didn’t resign immediately, at least) was one John Hanson of Frederick County, Maryland. Who?

    Like many of our Founding Fathers, John Hanson (and the eight men who served as President after him) have been relegated to the dustbin of history. Many prominent patriots don’t have statues dedicated to them in Washington, D.C. In fact, a lot of them died penniless and uncelebrated. For more info, see my article:

    Fate of the Forgotten Founding Fathers



    Once the signing of the Articles of Confederation took place in 1781, a President was needed to run the country. John Hanson was chosen unanimously by Congress (which included George Washington As the first President, Hanson had quite the shoes to fill. No one had ever been President of the United States; the responsibilities were vague and ill-defined, but there were issues to be settled.

    As the war for independence wound down, continental troops were demanding back salaries. Many of them were not in favor of the new government and even considered installing George Washington as King. John Hanson was responsible for quelling this discontent and held the rickety congress together.

    Hanson is also responsible for ejecting foreign troops out of the new country. This wasn’t easy, as many of our allies felt they had a claim to special privileges due to their aid for the American cause. Among other things, he also established the Treasury, War, and Foreign Affairs departments. All of this in a term of office that lasted only one year.

    After him, the following men were elected as President of congress:



    • Elias Boudinot 1782-3
    • Thomas Mifflin 1783-4
    • Richard Henry Lee 1784-5
    • John Hancock 1785-6 (elected but could not serve due to illness)
    • Dr. David Ramsay (Nov 23, 1785 – May 12, 1786)
      Nathaniel Gorham (May 15, 1786 – Nov 5, 1786)
    • Arthur St. Clair 1787-8
    • Cyrus Griffin 1788-9



    So why don’t we recognize these patriots as our first Presidents? Because we didn’t yet have a constitution that gave the federal government any significant power. As such, they served as President of Congress more than as leader of a united country.

    Therefore, George Washington was the first president to serve under a firm constitution that established the United States that we know today. The first presidents? They have faded into history, but let’s not forget their service to a fragile new entity that became a great nation.

    Joe Alton, M.D., aka Dr. Bones


    [​IMG]
    Joe Alton, M.D.



    http://www.doomandbloom.net/first-president/
     
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    Cholera Video: Survival Medicine with Dr Bones

    [video=youtube_share;11z45yemHvU]http://youtu.be/11z45yemHvU[/video]

    http://youtu.be/11z45yemHvU

    Published on Feb 16, 2015
    Cholera signs and symptoms with treatment in disasters and survival. Learn more at http://www.doomandbloom.net/ . Treating Cholera. How to treat Cholera. Survival Medicine. Doom and Bloom.
     
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    Rib Fractures



    February 16, 2015



    [​IMG]



    The chest cavity contains your heart and lungs, organs that could be easily injured if not protected. Your ribs form a protective armor around these organs, absorbing blunt trauma that could otherwise cause major damage. Ribs may fracture when subjected to force, resulting in pain and difficulty with breathing.

    In the U.S., 300,000 rib fractures are diagnosed and treated every year, with a small (7%) number resulting in hospitalization and, sometimes, surgical intervention. Trauma that is severe enough to fracture a rib can cause damage to the heart, lungs, blood vessels, and upper abdominal structures like the liver, diaphragm, kidneys, and spleen, depending on the location.

    RIB CAGE ANATOMY

    [​IMG]

    You have 12 pairs of ribs. These are sometimes characterized as “true ribs”, “false ribs”, and “floating ribs”. The true ribs (ribs 1-7) connect via flexible cartilage to the breastbone, or sternum. False ribs (8-10) connect to the sternum at the cartilage of the 7th rib. The 11th and 12th ribs “float” anteriorly, with no connection to the breastbone. All ribs connect to the thoracic spine in back. Ribs are also connected to each other by muscles (called “intercostal” muscles).

    SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF RIB FRACTURES

    If a rib is broken, several signs and symptoms are likely to appear. You can suspect a rib fracture if you note the following:

    • Pain at the site of injury
    • Increased pain with breathing or movement
    • Bruising of the chest or back over the ribs
    • Grating sensation or sound when fractured bone ends rub against each other (also known as “bone crepitus”)
    • Splinting, or the tensing of muscles in an effort to decrease pain

    In uncomplicated single fractures, there is often no change in the appearance of the chest wall. More serious or multiple fractures may present with:

    • Rapid, shallow breathing
    • Rapid heart rate
    Hemoptysis (coughing up blood) or blood in the urine
    • Irregular appearance at the site of injury (bump or indentation)
    • Assymetrical movement of the chest wall (sign of a condition called “Flail Chest”.

    A flail chest occurs when several adjacent ribs are fractured. It can be identified by placing one hand on each side of the chest, and observing movement during breathing. The uninjured side will rise during inspiration, but the flail injury will fall. This occurs because the “loose” segments of rib cage are pulled into the chest cavity when inhaling, increasing the work of breathing. Flail chest injuries often cause pulmonary contusions, a bruising of the lungs that interferes with oxygenation. Often, the patient requires ventilator support and will do poorly in austere settings.

    Serious fractures may puncture the lung, causing it to collapse, or cause internal bleeding. Efforts by the victim to limit pain by avoiding deep breathing may result in pneumonia, poor oxygenation, and even partial collapse (also called “atelectasis”). Treatment of a punctured lung will be discussed in a future article.

    TREATING A RIB FRACTURE


    In normal times, any patient with a suspected rib fracture should be taken immediately to a modern medical facility. The major goal of treatment is pain control. By decreasing the victim’s pain during breathing, you will preserve normal ventilation and prevent lung complications. The most commonly used medications are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents like Ibuprofen or Naproxen, although they may have risks if there is internal bleeding.

    If an injury occurs in the wilderness, the patient should be placed in a lateral position on the side where the injury occurred. Ice packs, if available, will help relieve discomfort. They should be applied for 20 minutes each hour the first 48 hours after the injury, and as needed afterwards. Limit activities that cause pain, but the patient should not be bedridden. Some recommend slinging the arm on the side of the injury with a soft pack of spare clothes for support.


    [​IMG]
    Rib Belt (no longer recommended)



    Previously, fractured ribs were treated with a binder called a “rib belt”. Although this method relieves some pain, it has since been determined to cause more harm than good by preventing the ability to take deep breaths. Although wrapping the chest is no longer done, some practitioners still suggest placing 4 or 5 strips of tape parallel to each other over the area of the injury. If you must do this, only tape one side from the spine to the sternum and observe for any restriction of breathing. Remember that, if a rib is displaced inward, any binding may push it further into the chest cavity.


    [​IMG]

    Prevent pneumonia or lung collapse due to “underbreathing” by encouraging slow deep breathing exercises and gentle coughing every 2 hours or so. Your patient will experience less pain during this process by holding a blanket or pillow against the site of injury. Signs of pneumonia will include fever and cough.



    [​IMG]
    Titanium Plates in place



    In situations where the rib segments are displaced, titanium plates are sometimes attached surgically to provide support and protect from further injury. This is required only in a small percentage of injuries. Healing from a rib fracture usually takes about 6 weeks, but the patient may not be pain-free until much later.

    Have you fractured a rib during your travels? Let us know about your experiences in the comments section!

    Joe Alton, M.D.


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/rib-fractures/
     
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    Dermatitis in Doomsday Scenarios


    March 18, 2013




    [​IMG]



    Few of us are blessed with perfect skin in normal times, and the circumstances surrounding a disaster are unlikely to improve that. Given that the preparedness community is composed of rugged individualists who may not put nice skin at the top of their survival priorities, you can expect to deal with a number of neglected skin issues if things go South. While they may not land your people in the survival sick room, they can be major annoyances and affect their work efficiency, and that’s unacceptable.

    What is Dermatitis?


    Most of us have heard of appendicitis, colitis or tonsillitis. The suffice “-itis” simply means inflammation; therefore, dermatitis simply means an inflammation of the skin. This condition may have many causes and may vary in appearance from case to case. Most types of dermatitis usually present with swollen, reddened and/or itchy skin. Continuous scratching traumatizes the irritated area and may lead to a type of deep skin infection called “cellulitis” once the skin is broken. Cellulitis could lead to a generalized infection that could lead to something dangerous. Here a link to my article on “cellulitis” (which actually has nothing to do with “cellulite”):

    http://doctorbonesandamyshow.blogspot.com/2011/09/cellulitis-epidemic-in-collapse.html


    Types of Dermatitis


    Many skin conditions look similar to each other, so I’ve provided a photo of each of the ones I describe. Some of the more common types of dermatitis are:


    [​IMG]



    · Contact dermatitis (above): Caused by allergens (allergy-causing substances) and chemical irritants. A good example would be poison ivy. Sometimes, wearing costume jewelry will cause it.

    You will most likely see contact dermatitis in an austere situation; your people will be exposed to substances, while scavenging, that may cause reactions. Some of these include:



    · Soaps. laundry soap and detergents.

    · Cleaning products.

    · Rubber or Latex.

    · Metals, such as nickel.

    · Weeds, such as poison ivy, oak or sumac.



    Once you’re sensitized to an allergen, your body’s immune system produces antibodies against them. Future exposures, therefore, may cause skin reactions. Your patient will probably experience these reactions on and off for the rest of his or her life. Corticosteroid creams, cool moist compresses and avoiding irritants will be the cornerstones of treatment. Use these only until the rash is improved. Antihistamines such as Benadryl or Claritin will help relieve itching. Of course, if the dermatitis was caused by contact with an irritant, avoid it if at all possible. It is a “trigger” that will set off future reactions.



    [​IMG]



    Seborrheic dermatitis (above): A commonly seen flaky, itchy condition that affects the face and scalp (common cause of dandruff). Scalp irritations caused by Seborrhea may be treated by shampoos that contain tar, pyrithione zinc (Head and Shoulders), or ketoconazole.



    [​IMG] ·


    Atopic Dermatitis or Eczema (above): A chronic itchy rash that can be found in various areas at once (oftentimes, the face) and tends to be intermittent in nature. This may be accompanied by hay fever or asthma, and sometimes flares up in cold weather. Treatment is similar to contact dermatitis.



    [​IMG]


    Neurodermatitis (above): A chronic itchy skin condition localized to certain areas of the skin (as seen in a herpes virus infection called “Shingles”). Neurodermatitis caused by Shingles may be treated with anti-viral agents, such as Acyclovir, Valtrex, or Famvir (but not by Tamiflu, a commonly used antiviral for influenza).



    [​IMG]


    · Stasis dermatitis (above): An inflamed area caused by fluid under the skin, commonly seen on the lower legs of older individuals. Poor circulation is a major factor here. To deal with dermatitis related to poor circulation, you may have to use support stockings on top of a mild steroid. See our article on varicose veins by using the search engine on the upper right of this page.



    [​IMG]


    Rosacea (above): A reddened area on the face that is caused by swollen blood vessels, usually in fair-skinned individuals beginning in middle age. It is accompanied by spider veins, flushing, and, sometimes, a markedly red nose and an appearance like acne. It is NOT acne, however, and will not respond with over-the-counter acne medicine. Antibiotics are sometimes used, and Vitamin A-related medications like Accutane may help.



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    Psoriasis (above): Thickened patches of reddened skin with silvery flaking. This is actually an auto-immune condition, where the body fails to recognize its own skin cells! This causes a reaction that causes the buildup of new skin cells where the body mistakenly thinks an injury has occurred. Moisturizers as well as corticosteroid and coal tar ointments are helpful; Psoriasis responds to sunlight, so phototherapy using special lamps are used in this condition.

    Natural supplements that improve dermatitis are numerous and often involve Omega-3 fatty acids, which have an anti-inflammatory effect. Used with evening primrose oil, it is especially effective. Chamomile cream is thought to be as potent as a mild hydrocortisone. Calendula has skin-soothing properties and may protect against contact dermatitis. Be aware that it may trigger an allergic reaction on broken skin.


    Learning to treat medical problems in a grid-down situation isn’t always about dealing with gunshot wounds and other major trauma. Sometimes, little things can make people miserable and affect their ability to contribute to group efforts. A working knowledge of skin conditions and their treatments will make you a more effective survival medic.



    Dr. Bones


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/dermatitis-in-doomsday-scenarios/
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [h=3]Survival Medicine Hour: Fractures, Superbugs, Questions for your Doctor[/h]
    February 21, 2015



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    In this episode of the Doom and Bloom(tm) Survival Medicine Hour, Joe and Amy Alton, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy, discuss the Bourbon virus superbug and antibiotic resistance, how to identify and treat rib fractures, and some very important questions that you should ask your doctor if you want to take charge of your health in good times OR bad…

    To listen in, click below:






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    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad…



    Joe Alton, MD
    Amy Alton, ARNP


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/survival-medicine-hour-fractures-superbugs-questions-for-your-doctor/
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    How Teeth Decay



    April 21, 2014




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    Many people in the preparedness community are ready for injuries and illness, but few people realize that dental problems will be part and parcel of any long-term survival scenario. Dental equipment may not be necessary if you spend a few days without power due to a storm. If you’re off the grid for 6 months or longer, however, this equipment will come in very handy. If dental supplies are one of the holes in your medical preparedness plan, then you’ll likely have a lot of holes in your smile. This is why we have dental kits in our online store as well as medical kits.

    In this article, we’ll discuss how how bacteria cause tooth disease. Bacteria live in your mouth and colonize your teeth. Usually, they will accumulate in the crevices on your molars and at the level where the teeth and gums meet. These colonies form an irregular thick film on the base of your enamel known as “tartar” or “plaque”. The more tartar you have, the less healthy your gums and teeth are.


    [​IMG]
    image: Bruce Blaus




    When you eat, these bacterial colonies also have a meal; they digest the sugars you take in and produce a toxic acid. This acid has the effect of slowly dissolving the enamel of your teeth (the outside of the tooth that’s shiny). This commonly happens around areas where you’ve had dental work already, like the edges of fillings and under crowns or caps. People born with deep crevices on the crowns of their molars may have more of a tendency to get cavities than others with smoother crowns.

    Once the enamel has broken down, you have what is called a “cavity”. This could take just a few months to cause problems or could take 2-3 years. Once the cavity becomes deep enough to invade the soft inner part of the tooth (the pulp), the process speeds up and, because you have living nerves in each tooth, starts to cause pain. If the cavity isn’t dealt with, it can lead to infection once the bacteria dig deep enough into the nerve or the surrounding gum tissue.


    [​IMG]
    gingivitis



    Inflamed gums have a distinctive appearance: They’ll bleed when you brush your teeth and appear red and swollen. This is called “gingivitis”, and is very common once you reach adulthood. As the condition worsens, it could easily lead to infection. If it affects the gums, it may spread to the roots of teeth or even the bony socket.


    [​IMG]
    image: KathrynEDarden




    Once the root of the tooth is involved, you could develop a particularly severe infection called an “abscess”. This is an accumulation of pus and inflammatory fluid that causes swelling and can be quite painful. Once you have an abscess, you will need antibiotic therapy and/or perhaps a procedure called an “incision and drainage” to drain the pus that has accumulated. The tooth will likely be unsalvageable at this point without a root canal treatment. Tooth abscesses, if untreated, sometimes cause bacteria to enter your circulation. This can cause a life-threatening condition called septicemia.

    Diet plays an important part in the process of cavity formation. A diet that is high in sugar causes bacteria to produce the most acid. The longer your mouth bacteria are in eating mode, the longer your mouth has acid digging into your teeth. The two most important factors that cause cavities are the number of times per day and the duration of time that the teeth are exposed to this acid.

    Let’s say you have a can of soda in your hand. If you drink the entire thing in 10 minutes, you’ve had one short episode in which your mouth bacteria are producing high quantities of acid. The acid level drops after about 30 minutes or so. If you nurse that soda, however, and sip from it continuously for hours, you’ve increased both the number of exposures to sugar and the amount of time it’s swishing around in there. The acid level never really gets a chance to drop, and that leads to decay.



    [​IMG]


    Here’s a simple way to make a survival toothbrush. Take a twig of live wood (Native Americans preferred black birch for its minty taste) and chew on the end until it gets fibrous. Then use that end to brush your teeth!

    More on dental preparedness in future articles.


    Joe Alton, M.D., aka Dr. Bones
     
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    dirt to oil Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    having a supply of CS on hand to rinse your mouth with can help as well
     
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    The Latest “Superbug”


    February 25, 2015



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    In previous articles, I’ve discussed the risk of overuse of antibiotics leading to antibiotic resistance. Recently, I reported good news in the development of a new antibiotic, Teixobactin. This antibiotic was discovered through a new method that allows evaluation of many microbes that live in soil. Although promising, we may have to wait years before new antibiotics receive approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This means that we still have much to worry about with regards to resistant bacteria.

    In 2001, a North Carolina hospital noted that some bacteria normally found in our intestinal tract, Enterobactericeae, were becoming resistant to antibiotics given for hospital-based infections. There have since been many such incidents: In 2012 alone, more than 200 medical facilities in 42 states reported at least 1 case. Hospital-acquired infections are called “nosocomial infections” and present a major issue to those taking care of patients who required advanced care, such as ventilator support.

    These resistant bacteria, including common pathogens such as E. Coli and Klebsiella, are known as Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE. The concern is that the Carbapenem class of antibiotics are often the last resort used to cure infections in those that are weakened by chronic disease or require nursing care. In these patients, presence of CRE in the bloodstream is associated with a 50% death rate, much more than more well-known troublesome bacteria such as MRSA (Methicillin-Resistant Staph. Aureus).



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    Majority of antibiotics go to livestock


    It’s uncertain how CRE first originated, but the food industry, with its almost-indiscriminate use of antibiotics in livestock, may be the culprit. 80% of antibiotics used in the U.S. today go to the animals we eat. This is not to cure an illness, but to make them grow faster and get to market sooner. It’s my belief that our issues with resistance stem, at least in part, from this practice.

    In recent news, some medical instruments used in hospitals appear to be a source of contamination, even after “sterilization” according to manufacturer recommendations. Hospitals in Seattle and Los Angeles have seen outbreaks in the last few weeks.

    How do we stop the upsurge in resistant bacteria? It’s not easy, but we should start by adjusting our attitudes towards the drugs we use. You shouldn’t use antibiotics for every minor ailment that comes along. This goes for doctors, but also for patients that believe that they are a quick fix for a respiratory infection. Most respiratory infection are viral in nature, and antibiotics do not affect viruses.

    Liberal use of antibiotics is a poor strategy for a few reasons. These include:

    • As previously mentioned, overuse can foster the spread of resistant bacteria. Antibiotics routinely given to turkeys caused a resistant strain of Salmonella that put over 100 people in the hospital in 2011. 36 million pounds of ground turkey were recalled.

    • Potential allergic reactions may occur. the worst cases could lead to anaphylactic shock.

    • Making a diagnosis may be more difficult if you take antibiotics before you’re sure what medical problem you’re actually dealing with. The antibiotics might temporarily “mask” the symptoms, which could cost valuable time in determining the correct treatment.

    Although CRE is currently limited to medical facilities, there is nothing that says that it may not spread to a community at large. Enforcement of strict infection control guidelines, including additions implemented in the 2014 Ebola scare, should decrease the number of events and the risk of CRE moving out of the hospital and into your home.


    Joe Alton, MD
     
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    [h=3]Survival Medicine Hour: Army Medical, Fungus, Bill Cirmo of BIBO Outfitters[/h]
    February 28, 2015



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    In this episode of the Doom and Bloom(tm) Survival Medicine Hour, Joe and Amy Alton, aka Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy, welcome Captain Bill Cirmo of BIBO (Bug-In Bug-Out) outfitters, author of the new book “Your BIBO Number: A guide for the (Sub)Urban Prepper”, a new way to quantify when it’s time bug in or bug out. Bill is also a former U.S. Navy pilot, dive instructor, and designer of an amazing bug-out trailer equipped with everything you could need in a survival situation. Also, Dr. Bones talks about Athlete’s foot, a small problem that could cause big problems with work efficiency off the grid, plus Nurse Amy discusses our European trip to a number of countries and the preppers we’ll be talking with there.


    To listen, click the link below:


    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/surviv...-medical-fungus-bill-cirmo-of-bibo-outfitters


    The BIBO website:


    http://www.bibooutfitters.com/

    Wishing you the best of health in good times or bad,


    Joe Alton, MD, and Amy Alton, ARNP


    http://www.doomandbloom.net/surviva...URSE+AMY'S+..........Doom+and+Bloom(tm)+Show)
     

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