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FerFal & Others On Preps, Survival & Other Related Topics

Discussion in 'Survival (Preps & Homestead)' started by searcher, Apr 7, 2015.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    *Rather than posting FerFal's (and other peep's) articles & vids on various survival and prepping topics in different threads willy-nilly I think it may be better to simply post them in one location. Please feel free to join in and post any articles and / or vids you come across that may be of value to the forum.

    Top 10 tips for Drought and Water Preparedness



    https://youtu.be/ZyhO-o2j9wk

    Published on Apr 7, 2015
    "Berkey Guy" link: http://www.directive21.com/
    My Two Books In Amazon!!
    "The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse"
    http://www.amazon.com/dp/9870563457?t...
    "Bugging Out And Relocating"
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1482...

    Website:
    http://www.themodernsurvivalist.com
    http://www.ferfal.blogspot.com
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 26, 2015
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  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    April 1, 2014


    Hydration for the Apocalypse: How to Store Water for Long-Term Emergencies


    Brett & Kate McKay



    [​IMG]
    A big storm and earthquake hits your town. It’s a certifiable quakenado.

    Your house is spared structural damage, but the power and water are out. According to news reports, the grid is down in your area and several water mains are broken. Conservative estimates are that it will take crews at least a week to get water service back on.

    Would you have enough water in your home for you and your family to last until the water came back? Or if you live in the southwest, would you have enough in a situation where your city just plain runs out of water?


    How Much Water Do I Need?

    [​IMG]
    Water…because ducking and covering works up a mighty thirst.



    The general rule of thumb is that you’ll need one gallon of water per person per day. Half a gallon is used for drinking and the other half is used for hygiene. That number will go up depending on a whole host of factors. If you live in a hot climate or have pregnant or nursing women in your group, you’ll want to store more water.

    Alright, so a gallon a day per person is the general rule.

    So the question becomes, how many days without water should you prep for?

    Well that depends on how prepared you want to be for varying degrees of disaster.

    FEMA recommends that everyone have enough water to last three days should your regular water source be disrupted. Three days of water should be enough to get you through the periods of water shut-off or contamination that can happen during natural disasters like earthquakes, tornadoes, and ice storms.

    Three days is a good starting point, but even during run-of-the-mill disasters, water access can be down for much longer than that.

    After spending hours reading prepper blogs and forums, it seems the general consensus is that you should have at least two weeks worth of water on hand. So for a single person, that’s 14 gallons of water. For a family of four, that would mean you’d need 56 gallons of water.

    Whether you decide to go above and beyond the two-week minimum is up to you. For lots of people, finding space in their home or apartment to store enough water for two weeks is a stretch, so trying to find room for a month might not be in the cards (though with a bit of creativity, you’d be surprised how you can arrange things in your house to make room for large amounts of water and food storage). Even if space isn’t an issue, the upfront costs for long-term water storage can be prohibitively expensive.

    My recommendation would be to start off with the two-week supply and slowly build up to larger amounts as space and money become available. Right now I have about a month’s worth of water for my family. The funny/scary thing about prepping is that it can become a weird obsession. Once I filled my two 55-gallon barrels with water, I immediately wanted more. Now I’m shooting for a year supply. Have I turned into a crazy SHTF (Sh*t Hits The Fan) prepper? Just a touch. I better get busy burying 42 school buses underground….


    Long-Term Water Storage Solutions

    So you’ve decided to start building your emergency water supply. You’ll need a safe container in which to store it. The general guideline is to use food-grade plastic bottles. You can also use glass bottles so long as they haven’t stored non-food items. Stainless steel is another option, but you won’t be able to treat your stored water with chlorine, as it corrodes steel. Finally, no matter what you store your water in, make sure you can seal it. You don’t want any bacteria or other contamination mucking up your drinking water. Below, we highlight several water storage options.


    Two-Week Water Storage Options


    [​IMG]


    Store-Bought Bottled Water.
    The easiest (but slightly more expensive) way to reach your water storage quota is to simply buy pre-packaged bottled water. It’s clean, well-sealed, and comes in food-grade plastic bottles.

    Moreover, bottled water is highly portable, which comes in handy if you need to bug out. This is a great option if you have limited space in your home or apartment. Just buy a bunch of packages and store them under beds. For example, one 35-count package of Poland Spring water provides about 4.6 gallons. That’s enough water to last one person four days. If you want two weeks of water, you just need four packages.

    Empty Soda/Water/Gatorade Bottles. If you’re a cheap bastard, you can just refill empty soda/water/Gatorade bottles with water from your tap. Just make sure to thoroughly clean the bottles first, using this process.

    5-7-Gallon Water Jugs. If you’re a regular camper, you might already have a few of these in your garage. They’re made from sturdy, food-grade plastic. The plastic is usually a dark blue which restricts light and helps prevent algae growth. I think the blue is also to remind you that “Hey! This is for water only!” The jugs are typically stackable, so they make for easy storage, even in the tightest of spaces. Their smallish size also makes for easy transport in case you need to leave your home base.


    One Month or More Water Storage Options

    waterBOB. If you’ve read The Road, you’ll likely remember the scene where our protagonist begins to fill up a bathtub immediately after seeing flashes that signal an impending apocalypse outside his window. He knew the city water would be shutting off soon, and he wanted to store as much as he could before that happened. This is actually in my emergency plan if we ever encounter a SHTF moment here in Tulsa. While filling up a tub will give you 100 gallons of water, the problem is that it’s not very sanitary for a couple of reasons. First, when was the last time you cleaned your tub? And if you did clean it recently, did you use harsh chemicals to do so? Either way, you probably don’t want to drink water straight from it. Second, water in your tub has no covering so it’s susceptible to all sorts of contamination.


    [​IMG]
    In times of crisis, a waterBOB is quite handy. Be sure to have fresh towels and some scented candles on hand as well, as seen above. Even during the apocalypse, everyone needs some “me time.”



    That’s where the waterBOB comes in. It’s a giant, heavy-duty plastic bag that holds up to 100 gallons of water. Just place it in your bathtub and fill with water from your tub faucet. Boom! Instant sanitary water storage.

    This is a good option for folks with limited space. Just bust it out whenever you think you’ll need to use it. The downside is that when you think you need it, there might not be any water to fill it up.

    Water Barrels. If you have the space and you’re looking to have at least one month of water storage on hand, you can’t go wrong with 55-gallon water barrels. They’re made from sturdy food-grade plastic and have bungs at the top that can be sealed super tight in order to protect your water from contamination. The plastic is also BPA-free and UV-resistant. Two of these babies will give a family of four about 27 days worth of water. This is what I have right now for my water storage solution.

    There are a few downsides. The first one is space. If you live in an apartment, you probably won’t have room for a 55-gallon water barrel. The second is price. Each barrel will set you back about $90. You’ll also need to buy a pump and a specialty drinking water hose to fill them up. Finally, they’re not very portable. A full barrel weighs in at 440 lbs. You’ll definitely want a more portable option available in case you need to bug out.

    If you’re looking to store more than a month of water, you might consider getting one (or more!) of these 320-gallon water storage systems. I’m looking to add one to our garage later this year.

    How to Store Water in 55-Gallon Barrels

    [​IMG]
    I’ve got two 55-gallon barrels in my garage.



    [​IMG]
    While probably not necessary, I placed my barrels on a wooden pallet to avoid a possible chemical reaction between the barrels and the cement.



    [​IMG]
    Experts recommend that you avoid using a regular old garden hose when filling up your water barrels and instead use a speciality drinking water hose.



    [​IMG]
    Filled them up. It didn’t take as long as I thought it would.



    [​IMG]
    Many prepper sites recommend pre-treating your water with chlorine to help prevent algae and bacteria growth. However, several sites claim that this isn’t even necessary because tap water is already treated with chlorine. I treated one barrel and not the other. It will be interesting to see if there’s any difference between the two in a year.



    [​IMG]
    After filling your barrels, make sure to seal the bung as tight as you can. Remember, water doesn’t spoil. What causes water to go bad is contamination.



    [​IMG]
    Even though you might have giant barrels full of water, it’s a good idea to have smaller storage jugs in case you need to bug out of your house.





    Rain Barrels.
    In addition to storing tap water, you might consider adding some rain barrels into your system. Simply place a rain barrel at the bottom of your gutter pipe, and whenever it rains your barrel collects the water. Rainwater harvesting is an eco and budget friendly way to create a long-term water storage reserve. Because it comes from the heavens, and it’s sitting in a barely-protected barrel outside, you’ll want to filter and sanitize rainwater before drinking it. Some preppers just use rainwater for hygiene and save their stored tap water for drinking. Although it’s a myth that some states have made rainwater collection illegal, some drought-prone states have regulations on methods and require permits, and some states (like Texas) actually give a tax credit for buying rain collection equipment. Be sure to check the regulations for your state.


    Water Cistern System. Water cisterns are a big step up from rain barrels. They’re basically giant holding containers that you use to capture rain water. Water cistern systems can hold anywhere from 1,400 gallons to 12,000 gallons of water. If you’re planning for end-of-the-world-as-we-know-it events, water cisterns are where it’s at. You’ll need space where you can place a giant water tank and you’ll need to develop a system of pipes to deliver rainwater to the cistern. Also, the tanks used in cistern systems usually aren’t food friendly. You’ll want to treat the water before drinking it or use cistern water primarily for hygiene purposes.


    Back-up Water Solutions

    In addition to having stored water, you’ll want to have options to filter and purify water in case you need to use water from rivers, streams, or lakes to supplement your supply. Creek Stewart recommends having three options on hand to produce clean drinking water: filter, chemical, and boiling.



    • Water filter. I have a Katadyn Hiker Pro Filtration System in my bug-out bag. You can produce about 1 liter of clean water per minute with it. You definitely can’t rely on it for your primary source of clean water. It’s just a supplement.
    • Purification tablets. I have some iodine and sodium chlorite tablets for purification as well.
    • Fuel and stove to boil water. Finally, I have a small stove and fuel in my bug-out bag so I can boil water to purify it.



    [​IMG]
    If you find yourself in a scenario where you have a paper bag but not a pot in which to boil water in…I present to you a life hack from a 1950s issue of Modern Mechanix magazine.

    Common Questions About Water Storage

    Do I need to rotate my water every year? This is probably the most common question and the most common answer is, yes, you need to change your water out at least once a year. But after looking into it, I found that this isn’t necessarily true. First, it’s important to understand that water doesn’t have an expiration date. If properly stored, water doesn’t spoil. What makes water go bad is contamination that gets into it. If you take proper precautions in sealing and storing your water so that bacteria or other contaminants don’t get into it, your water could theoretically stay good forever. In fact, I’ve read lots of blog posts from folks who’ve imbibed five-year-old stored water without any problems. So, as long as you take proper precautions, no, you don’t need to change your water out every year. However, if you’re worried about contamination, then go ahead and do it.

    Do I need to treat my water with chlorine before I store it? A few prepper sites recommend that you treat your water with chlorine before you seal its storage container. But if you’re using tap water from your city to fill your water storage, it’s unnecessary. Tap water has already been treated with chlorine. If you properly seal your bottle or drum, you shouldn’t have to worry about bacteria or algae growth. If the day comes that you have to crack open your water source and you’re worried about contamination, feel free to add chlorine. The proper amount is 1/8 teaspoon of chlorine per gallon of water. To make it easier, just buy some water treatment drops. They tell you exactly what you need to add.

    Do I need to boil my stored water before I drink it? If you have reason to believe that your water has been contaminated, then boil it. If not, don’t. It’s a waste of fuel.

    Why does my stored water taste funny? Is it contaminated? Stored water will often taste flat and weird because there’s no oxygen in it. To get rid of that weird stored water taste, simply swish your water around your cup a few times before drinking.

    Do I need to store my water off the cement? If you plan on storing water in 55-gallon barrels, you’ll likely come across recommendations to not store the barrels on your garage’s cement floor and to instead place them on wooden pallets. The reason given is that chemicals in the cement can cause a chemical reaction with the plastic storage container and possibly contaminate the water. Looking into this a bit more, this seems to be more of an old prepper wives’ tale. I couldn’t find any scientific research to back up this claim. A few prepper sites claimed that storing your water on cement only became a problem when your cement got really hot.

    To be on the safe side, I went ahead and put my water barrels on a pallet. Didn’t cost me much more and didn’t take up much more space. You can also use carpet or flattened cardboard boxes too.

    I have a swimming pool. Can’t I just use that for my emergency water? If you have an average size swimming pool out back, you have around 20,000 gallons of water at your disposal in case of an emergency. It’s certainly drinkable. You just have to be smart about it. Because of the chlorine and pump/filter, pool water is typically free of contaminants like algae and bacteria. Don’t be freaked out about drinking chlorinated pool water. The recommended chlorine levels for pools is 2 parts per million. Water with chlorine levels below 4 parts per million is safe for humans to drink.

    The problem with relying on pool water for a long-term water solution is that in a grid-down situation in which water and electricity are out for more than a week, that pool water is going to go bad. First, chlorine levels will drop in a few days unless you keep adding chlorine to the pool. If you don’t have enough chlorine on hand, that means the water will become an algae and bacteria breeding ground in a short while. Second, without electricity, your pool’s pump and filter can’t clean out the gunk. So after a week, your pristine drinkable pool water will start to “spoil.” With that in mind, you might consider having several collapsible water carriers on hand and filling them up with pool water if you think the power will be down for more than a week. Fill as many as you can and put them in your garage. You should boil or chemically treat any pool water before drinking it just to be safe.

    What about saltwater pools? Well, that’s a bit trickier. There’s a lot of mixed info out there on the topic. A few people make the case that salt levels in saltwater pools aren’t as high as you’d think they’d be, and are arguably in the safe range for drinking. On the other hand, their levels are still pretty high and too much salt consumption in a survival situation can be detrimental to your overall well-being, so you’re better off not swigging the stuff. It’s better to play it safe by avoiding drinking the saltwater from your pool. If you do have a saltwater pool and would like to use the water, consider using it only for hygiene purposes. If you want to use it for drinking, use a solar desalination device like this one. Just be warned, it takes a long time to produce drinkable water.


    Do you have an emergency water supply? Tell me about your system in the comments!


    http://www.artofmanliness.com/2014/...how-to-store-water-for-long-term-emergencies/
     
  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Outdoors Mancave Workshop



    https://youtu.be/UqVhjxnQ_Xw

    Published on Apr 8, 2015
    [This video is viewable in 'Full HD']
    [Please click on the 'Show More' tab for more information and important links]

    With the onset of longer and (hopefully) sunnier days I desperately needed an outdoors area to practise fire making skills, woodworking, blacksmithing, etc. So as a temporary set up I got myself a gazebo with the view of getting something a lot more robust in the coming months

    Hope you enjoy this short video and i've also posted a small photo album of this project on my Fanpage, you can check that out by clicking this link - https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?s...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 26, 2015
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Soviet-Era Survival Kicks in for Ukrainians in Rebel Wasteland

    Bloomberg
    Yulia Surkova, Daryna Krasnolutska and Stepan Kravchenko1 day ago


    1.jpg
    © Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP/Getty Images A pack of stray dogs follow women walking past a a burnt out shop in the Kievsky district of the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk on April 2, 2015


    (Bloomberg) -- Deep behind rebel lines in eastern Ukraine, cash machines on garbage-covered streets have long run out of bills and residents rely on fixers to survive.

    A pro-Russian insurgency that erupted a year ago has left more than 6,000 people dead and economic desperation is taking hold across the rebel-controlled regions, once Ukraine’s industrial heartland. As their homeland became one of the world’s strategic geopolitical fault lines, residents of the self-proclaimed rebel republics of Donetsk and Luhansk are struggling with even the most mundane tasks.

    Hemmed in by travel curbs, residents of one village near the separatist stronghold of Luhansk were left short of options when rebel handouts dried up. Lidiya, 61, now pays a local middleman to ferry her pension across the front line from a bank in government-controlled Kharkiv

    “People queued for days to get money from the rebels and some fought each other,” said Lidiya, who lives off food grown in her garden in the town of Petrovskoe, 63 kilometers (40 miles) from Ukrainian territory and declined to give her last name for fear of reprisal. “They had to fire shots into the air to make everyone leave once the cash ran out.”

    Life inside Ukraine’s pro-Russian breakaway republics hinges on a shadow economy flourishing amid the cease-fires, embargoes and severed supply lines of a yearlong war. The shortages underscore the difficulties rebels and their backers in the Kremlin face in establishing a semblance of normality as they seek to cement their rule. They also highlight the mounting costs of the war as the government in Kiev starts debt- restructuring talks.

    In Limbo

    “The conflict has wiped off relatively comfortable living standards achieved in the last two decades,” Lilit Gevorgyan, a senior analyst at the IHS Global Insight Inc. research company in London, said by e-mail. “The political and military limbo will only make the economy of the region worse and deepen the humanitarian crisis.”

    The upshot will be increased costs for whichever side ends up controlling the regions, she said. A persisting stalemate may trigger mass migration along with a “slow and painful” recovery, while Ukraine regaining authority may raise expectations of greater financial support, with likely frequent protests pressuring the government to “fork out aid and investment,” according to Gevorgyan.

    For now, Soviet-era survival instincts are kicking in as businesses sprout up to fetch cash, medicines and diapers from government-held areas. Couriers skirt roadblocks and burnt-out tanks to feed demand.

    ‘Drastically Worsened’

    While a February truce helped reduce the thunder of artillery, Ukrainians in the areas run by insurgents face a battle to access money and food staples. The government in Kiev now requires people to carry travel passes to keep the separatists at arm’s length, which has left many citizens stranded and worsened an already acute humanitarian crisis.

    The situation continues to deteriorate, according to the United Nations, with access to benefits and services cut off since December in rebel territory.

    “This has drastically worsened the plight of people living there, seriously affecting access to basic services and food,” the UN said in a March 13 report.

    It takes about a month to get papers to enter territory controlled by the government. For those without a pass, the array of options is outlined on fliers pasted to wooden notice boards at bus stops and via social networks.

    Vodka, Cigarettes

    Some try bribes. The going rate is as much as 25,000 hryvnia ($1,100), according to Konstantin, who declined to give his last name to avoid prosecution. Cash doesn’t always work, though, as Konstantin said his truck filled with vodka, cigarettes and food got stuck at a checkpoint as the shooting of a secret-service officer sparked a crackdown.

    “Everyone I ask to help says I can forget about the truck,” Konstantin said.

    In Donetsk, the conflict zone’s biggest city, businessmen lean on contacts at border checkpoints to shuttle clients in minibuses 65 kilometers to Konstantynivka, on Ukrainian territory. There they can withdraw cash and visit local shops for products from antibiotics to baby food.

    While markets and stores are open in Donetsk, other cities like Debaltseve, the site of a weeks-long siege, are afflicted by shortages. That means humanitarian aid is spread thin, according to Dmitry Filimonov, who said he recently collected $2,000 worth of donations from Moscow and Kiev. The breakdown of local services also makes it difficult to get supplies to those who need them the most, he said.

    ‘Really Hungry’

    Aid is “distributed in the center and people living on the outskirts just don’t get to it in time because city transport isn’t working,” said Filimonov, 32. “We brought 130 packages of food to Debaltseve and a long line appeared near our bus in minutes. Those people were really hungry.”

    A special service geared toward the elderly is pension tours that whisk them off to Ukrainian banks to get monthly payments of 1,500 hryvnia ($65), charging about 300 hryvnia.

    The charges are high because of the cost, according to Oleh, who drives 36 hours from Petrovskoe to reach Ukrainian territory via Russia and re-register pensioners for 2,000 hryvnia each. Before the fighting started in the aftermath of President Vladimir Putin’s annexation of Crimea last March, the trip took 4 hours.

    Illegal Crossing

    “I have to pay penalties for crossing the border illegally,” said Oleh, who declined to give his last name because of the nature of his business. “We’re looking now for the best routes.”

    The new businesses sometimes run into opposition.

    Mariupol, under government control, is a hotspot where couriers show up clutching stacks of bank cards to withdraw cash. Donetsk coal mines often select one employee to make the journey and collect wages for his colleagues. Some wind up scuffling with frosty locals who don’t welcome the trips, according to 31-year-old Eduard Horlov.

    “Once every two weeks, Mariupol steel workers get paid at the same time as buses arrive from Donetsk carrying people to take out cash,” said Horlov, a locksmith. “You see lines of 50 to 100 people at ATMs and there are can be scuffles.”

    For those who’re able, the shadow economy is a lifeline. Far from being angry at the fees, there’s gratitude at not being completely cut off.

    “It costs a lot for me, of course” said Petrovna from Petrovskoe, who paid 1,000 hryvnia arrange for her pension to be re-registered in another town. “But I can’t do it myself. It’s good there are people who’re dealing with this.”


    To contact the reporters on this story: Yulia Surkova in Donetsk at ysurkova@bloomberg.net; Daryna Krasnolutska in Kiev at dkrasnolutsk@bloomberg.net; Stepan Kravchenko in Donetsk at skravchenko@bloomberg.net To contact the editors responsible for this story: Balazs Penz at bpenz@bloomberg.net Andrew Langley


    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world...n-rebel-wasteland/ar-AAav7j0?ocid=mailsignout
     
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  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    [h=1]Panic Buying when the SHTF[/h]Posted on Friday, April 10, 2015 by Thoreau



    1973 was a year of real shortages. In December of 1973, a Wisconsin congressman put out a press release warning of a possible shortage of toilet paper within a few months. Few took notice. Then Johnny Carson used that news item as the basis for a humorous claim:

    “You know, we’ve got all sorts of shortages these days,” he told 20 million viewers. “But have you heard the latest? I’m not kidding. I saw it in the papers. There’s a shortage of toilet paper!”


    Consumers thought the joke was true, and they rushed out to buy large quantities of toilet paper. The shelves were stripped bare within days. Store owners ordered more toilet paper, and jacked up the prices. But it continued to sell out. Demand outpaced the supply, and manufacturers could not increase production sufficiently to meet that demand. There were high prices and low availability, all due to panic buying based on a joke. The shortage lasted about 4 months. More here: The toilet paper scare of 1973.

    Panic buying can also happen when there is a real reason for increased demand. When there is a hurricane approaching Florida or the Gulf States, even one of moderate size, the stores quickly sell out of bottled water, batteries, power generators, and similar necessities.

    When the tsunami and power plant disaster happened in Japan in March of 2011, panic buying by consumers quickly stripped the store shelves bare in Tokyo, a city 150 miles away from the power plant disaster site. The disaster did not directly affect Tokyo. Food stores were sold out due mainly to fear. But regardless, there was no food available for purchase.

    We’ve also seen shortages of ammo in recent years due to fears that the federal government might place new and severe restrictions on firearms and ammunition. The effect was less of a sudden spike, and more of a gradually increasing wave of extra purchases. As a result, the effect lasted much longer. Even now, prices are up on ammo and availability has not fully recovered.

    But the principle can be applied on a larger scale. The cause could be: severe economic disaster, a catastrophic failure of the U.S. electrical grid, an economic disaster (e.g. the gov’t defaulting on the national debt), a dirty bomb attack on U.S. soil, a national outbreak of Ebola, or a dozen other severe disasters. On a larger scale, panic buying could threaten our ability to obtain enough food. Gov’t intervention could make matters worse. Protests would likely turn violent. Many people would resort to violent crime to obtain the food and other supplies they need.

    But you’ll still be able to buy the latest smart phone or video game. So it ain’t all bad news. Necessities will sell-out quickly. Unnecessary items will still be available. Instead of waiting in line for hours to get the latest electronic gadget, people will queue up for food. Just like i the old Soviet bloc nations.

    Prepping for this eventuality means storing food, starting a garden, storing seeds and gardening supplies, storing batteries, maybe buying a small solar panel, etc. As a prepper, I’ve been lax lately. The absence of recent disasters has left me a little complacent. I have to remind myself and my readers that disasters happen suddenly and unexpectedly. And sooner or later, some type of SHTF situation will occur.


    – Thoreau


    http://www.prep-blog.com/2015/04/10/panic-buying-when-the-shtf/
     
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Army Field Kitchen: "Cooking Outfit For Small Detachments" 1961 US Army Training Film 20min



    https://youtu.be/ipaEK4Oe3b4

    Published on Aug 27, 2012
    more at http://quickfound.net/links/military_...

    "FEATURES, TRANSPORT, INSTALLATION AND USE OF UNIT - PROPER COOKING AND SERVING PROCEDURES - DISASSEMBLY AND PACKING OF UNIT FOR MOVE TO NEW AREA."

    US Army Training Film TF10-3119

    Public domain film from the National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied.
    The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

    1944 TB 10-400-2 "Outfit, Cooking, Small Detachment"
    http://www.105th.org/paperwork/misc/s...

    http://www.qmfound.com/history_of_rat...

    RATIONS
    Conference Notes
    Prepared by The Quartermaster School
    For the Quartermaster General
    January 1949

    THE HISTORY OF RATIONS...

    Early American Rations

    At the opening of the Revolutionary War, the colonies fed their own militia. Once the Army had grown, and had taken on a uniform character, the problem of feeding this unit became both acute and difficult. Shortly after George Washington was elected Commander in chief, the Continental Congress created a Commissary General of Stores Provisions, Joseph Trumbull, who had distinguished himself in feeding the Connecticut militia, was appointed to fill the job. The earliest legislation fixing the components of the Army ration was passed on November 4, 1775. A ration is the allowance of food for the subsistence of one person for one day. This first ration provided the following components:

    l6 oz; beef 6.8 oz.peas

    18 oz. flour 1.4 oz. rice

    16 oz. milk .1830 oz. Soap

    1 qt. spruce beer .0686 oz. candle

    Compared with our present dietary requirements, this ration provided more calories, twice as much protein, an adequate supply of all minerals and vitamins with the exception of vitamins A and C...

    Field ration D

    Field ration D was developed by Colonel Paul P. Logan, who worked on its development from 1933 to 1937. This ration in no way resembled the old World War I ration, which has been called the Armour ration, or the reserve ration of 1922. It consisted of a chocolate bar, stabilized to a high melting point by the inclusion of oat flour, and it provided 600 calories. Three 4-ounce chocolate bars provided one ration.

    Field ration D proved to be convenient and versatile; it can be called the first modern emergency ration. Because it did not provide the soldier with 3 full, palatable, and nutritionally balanced meals per day, it was felt that another ration was needed. Early in 1932, a Sanitary Corps Reserve officer submitted "a balanced meal in a can", which consisted of a pound of stew composed of 12 vegetables, and 9 meats mixed in the proportions supposedly required to make a well-balanced meal and alleged to contain all the necessary vitamins and minerals.

    Further development in ration research

    Little attention was given to this can of food until in 1937 when W. R. McReynolds, the first director of the new Subsistence Research Laboratory inaugurated studies for the purpose of revising the reserve ration, and supplementing it with prepared meals in tin cans, such as beef stew, beef with noodles, etc. In 1938, Major McReynolds completed his work on the ration and called it a combat ration. It was presented to the Quartermaster Corps Technical Committee which approved it with the recommendation that a further study be made with a view to increase the caloric value of the ration. On 1 November, 1939, the Adjutant General announced the adoption of field ration C. It consisted of 3 cans containing a meat and vegetable component, and 3 cans, containing crackers, sugar, and soluble coffee; it furnished 2974 calories, 114 grams of protein, and an adequate supply of vitamins and minerals.

    The K ration

    Neither the C nor the D ration filled the need for a special ration suitable for use in highly mobile warfare. The D ration was intended to allay worst hunger of a single missed meal; the C ration was considered too heavy and bulky for mobile units. Dr. Ancel Keys, Director of the Laboratory of Physiological Hygiene at the University of Minnesota, first suggested a ration to be used for parachute troops, tank corps, motorcycle troops and other mobile units. Several organizations worked on the specifications prescribed by Dr. Keyes for such a ration. The final results of this work was the ration officially designated as field ration, type K. The letter K had no particular significance; it was chosen merely to have a phonetically different letter from the letters C and D. The K ration was officially adopted in 1942. It was packed in 8 units, and yielded approximately 8300 calories, 99 grams of protein, and was slightly under specifications in minerals and vitamins as recommended by the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Research Council...
     
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    CIVIL DEFENSE FILM "FOOD SUPPLY AFTER THE BOMB" 28142



    https://youtu.be/Bty_SiaVtaA

    Published on Apr 10, 2015
    Created in the 1950s, "Food Supply After the Bomb" examines the aftermath of an atomic attack, and posits what the response might be from civilians and government officials. The devastation to America's food production areas, and the food and drinking water shortages that would follow as a result of contamination, is dramatized. Rationing would be a necessity, and each American home should (according to the narrator) keep at least a ten day supply of food on hand in an "Emergency Food Box" filled with canned goods.

    While somewhat ridiculous in the light of history, the issues presented by this film remain relevant today.

    We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference."
     
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    *Something a little different..............

    ULTIMATE BugOut Jeep- Black Scout Survival



    https://youtu.be/COfHGZXlMb0

    Published on Apr 15, 2015
    In this episode we take a look at the gear and modifications Ive made to my Jeep Wrangler
     
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    A Crucial Prepping Item



    https://youtu.be/HXVLkxVW3FQ

    Published on Apr 15, 2015
    A brief discussion about a commodity that will be absolutely crucial in a grid down situation.
     
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    12 Survival Lessons from Ukraine: “Nothing Provides as Much Valuable Information as Real World Situations”


    [TABLE]
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    [TD]Fernando "FerFAL" Aguirre
    April 18th, 2015
    The Modern Survivalist


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    Editor’s Note: FerFAL has been a leading voice in the preparedness movement before there ever was a preparedness movement. In the early 2000′s Fernando personally witnessed financial and socio-economic collapse on a massive scale in Argentina. He witnessed the complete meltdown of his country’s currency and can speak first-hand about what hyperinflation looks like. As you might expect, following the Argentine destabilization FerFAL witnessed the panic, desperation, and violence that one might expect when the world around you collapses. He wrote about his experiences in his widely popular The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse. His book is loaded with practical information and advice, and remains a must-read for anyone who is serious about actionable strategies to prepare for similar events in their own locales. His most recent book, Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying Put Is Not An Option, delves into strategies for getting out of Dodge and finding a new home so that you can avoid what he lived through in Argentina.


    In his latest article, generously shared with our community and originally posted at his website The Modern Survivalist, Fernando highlights twelve survival lessons we can learn from the Ukraine conflict. As he can attest, nothing provides as much valuable information as real world situations.


    [​IMG]


    12 Survival Lessons from Ukraine


    By Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre


    [​IMG]



    The war in Ukraine is a tragic event but it’s one that we can all learn from. Nothing provides as much valuable information as real world situations where ordinary people are forced to deal with extraordinary events. At the end of the day, the war in Ukraine gives us plenty of examples of what works and what doesn’t, and while personal experience is important, the wise person learns from other people’s mistakes so as to not repeat them himself.

    There are several articles explaining what people are going through in eastern Ukraine right now. This article over at dailymail provides a good visual image of what people are going through. There’s also a thread in survivalist boards where a Dunbass resident that goes by the name of George1980 has been posting, sharing his experiences. I highly recommend reading it if you have the time.

    Using this information, here are twelve important lessons based what has happened so far in Ukraine:


    [​IMG]




    1) Artillery & infantry beats survivalist hero fantasies. Every. Single. Time.

    Maybe the most obvious lesson to be learned is how miserably all these fantasies about forming survival groups, living in a retreat while fighting against impossible odds would ultimately fail. There’s simply no surviving against an occupation force when facing them as an individual or small group. Houses, towns and even entire cities can eventually get surrounded and overpowered. A single house or compound represents a laughable resistance to organized armed forces, let alone ones with artillery and air support at their disposal. Once shooting at your position is no longer fun, they’ll just blow you up. It’s as simple as that.





    2) Cover the basics. Food, water, shelter and medicines.

    In various parts of eastern Ukraine, People are suffering the lack of water, electricity and food shortages. You need to store food, food that requires no refrigeration and little or no cooking. You need water, not just a water filter (which you should have as well) but actual jugs of water. For true emergencies and survival situations, just like you can’t have too much food you can’t have too much water. Have a well, have a river, if nothing else keep an eye out for large barrels on sale and keep some full of water. Even the jugs for carrying water become valuable. Have a good supply of medicines: ibuprofen, vomit and diarrhea medicine, liquid ibuprofen for children, bandages, diapers, formula and antibiotics. Antibiotics are the difference between life and death when you need them. Have lanterns, flashlights and lots of batteries. Get and emergency crank radio. Get a solar charger for your phone and batteries. Have alternative means of cooking and heating. A wood burning stove may do the trick, but make sure you always keep extra wood stored for emergencies. Maybe you’re lucky enough to still have power, if so an electric burner can be put to good use then, saving other fuels for when power goes out. Have extra fuel in storage for your vehicle, enough to make it to your potential bug out location in case you have to leave in a hurry. Have a tent and sleeping bags. These can be used not only for sleeping in tents, but also if you happen to find yourself in a refugee camp during winter or in an unfurnished flat after evacuation or if you’re staying with friends or family.

    In a shelled city, underground is the only safe place to be, to some extent at least. An actual bunker would be ideal, but people try finding shelter anywhere underground. In buildings, windows and doors are covered with sandbags and people sleep in the interior room away from exterior walls and windows. Windows never survive shelling. The broken glass makes it impossible to stay warm in winter. Plastic sheeting can sometimes be used to close openings and still allow light in, but this is far from an ideal solution and he loss of heat is substantial.


    [​IMG]



    3) Don’t get involved.

    From a survival perspective, the best way to go about conflicts that can develop into violent clashes is to not get involved in the first place. Avoid going to protests and marches. This is especially true in cases such as the one of Ukraine, where people are seen on one side or the other during protests and clashes, often filmed. Something as simple as a rival remembering your face from the rallies can land you in jail or worse. In this kind of situation, it’s even neighbors, former friends and coworkers that may remember your political affiliation. They may end up mentioning your name to the new authorities and they will come after you.



    4) Attitude, clothes, and gear can get you killed or arrested.

    Here is where the gray man approach comes into play. Be as neutral as possible not only regarding your actions and behavior, but also when it comes to insignias, clothes, and gear. Even beards or unusual or characteristic hair styles can get you in trouble. According to George1980 “There was very unpleasant situation on the Ukrainian check-point, when one soldier wanted to arrest me as separatist)) Fortunately, my wife and daughters were with me and this soldier did not stopped me. Problem was that I have a beard and, may be, my face was very “suspicious” ))) Soldier told me that)”.

    Checkpoints in Ukraine are there for a reason: finding enemies. Having a weapon can get you into trouble, but also things such as maps, GPS, political propaganda, radios, this can all be consider espionage material. Adventurers traveling around the world have often mentioned how they get arrested in war zones because of their cameras and laptops. You’re not local, you have electronics capable of being used for communication, then you’re a suspect until proven otherwise. Lots of people have GPS, radios and maps in their Bug Out Bags. Just make sure to be smart about it and understand that in some cases, when dealing with factions fighting over power, it can get you in trouble and its better to get rid of some of it before reaching a checkpoint.


    [​IMG]



    5) Learn to deal with checkpoints.

    In checkpoints, women and children aren’t as carefully inspected as men. Private vehicles are checked much more thoroughly than public transportation. Maybe you’re better off taking a bus or train. Its important to travel light and be in good health and properly dressed to walk long distances if needed. Bribes may be needed so have cash. A hidden weapon may get you killed or arrested. Is it worth the risk to conceal a handgun among your belongings while evacuating? Probably not, but you’ll have to decide that yourself given your specific situation. Valuable items such as jewelry, cash and even electronics may be “confiscated” or downright stolen by the troops. Conceal them as well as you can. Cash and small gold coins can be hidden in shoe insoles, inside children toys or dirty diapers in the baby’s diaper bag. Coins can be sewed under jacket patches and insignias, under buttons. Women have managed to hide small rolls of cash inside them as if they were tampons, placed inside condoms. Refugees have swallowed small gold coins and jewelry so as to be recovered later. Desperate times call for desperate measures. When it comes to gold vs silver, gold is more compact and easier to hide. I wouldn’t like to swallow 1000 usd worth or silver coins!


    [​IMG]



    6) Guns can save you, but they can also get you killed.

    According to George1980 “separatists very afraid Ukrainian saboteurs on their territory and try to catch every man with gun who are not from their “Army”.”

    Are you fighting along with one of the factions involved? If not, then make sure you’re not confused with one. If you just want to be left alone, then don’t openly carry a gun. Openly carrying a weapon means you are a fighter on either side of the conflict. If you’re not with either one, BOTH will consider you an armed enemy. At the end of the day a gun can save your life, but in a world of no easy black and white answers a gun can also get you killed. Keep any weapons concealed, and be ready to ditch them, sell them or cache them depending on the situation you are involved in. Just going gun-ho is not the one and only answer to all problems.

    I sure would like to be armed if I was still in Argentina today. If there’s trouble, 1000 bucks will most likely buy any cop’s silence. At the same time, in the 70’s during the military Junta and state terrorism, going around armed in Argentina wasn’t a good idea if you wanted to avoid trouble. If you were caught and found to be armed, the security forces would immediately assume you were a montonero, a leftist terrorist, and you would be tortured, executed or go “missing”. During these torture sessions, people that had no involvement would often mention the names of innocent people, just to stop the tortures. Just being in the wrong phone list of a coworker or fellow student was enough for the security forces to pay you a visit.



    7) Get a Glock 9mm and a rifle with a folding stock.

    As explained earlier, you want to be able to conceal your weapons. Eventually, you may have to leave behind you rifle and even your handgun. You sure won’t be boarding an evacuation plane with one. What about going through check points? Is it worth getting killed or arrested? Or are you better of selling you gun to someone that is staying behind, grab a few extra hundred bucks just as you board a bus or train leaving the conflict area? You want a gun that is ubiquitous, that fires a common round and has a well-known reputation. Basically you want a great weapon that works well for you, but you also want a weapon that is eventually easy to sell as well. Conflict or not, Glocks and AKs are great staples.



    8)Passports and ID are crucial.

    When traveling away from the conflict zones in Ukraine you better have your ID. Soldiers at checkpoints will want passports, driver licenses or other ID proofs. They may not ask for them all the time, but if they do, you better have them. They will want to know as much about you as possible. If you get the chance to leave the country, you better have your passport ready as well. Other countries are already refusing offer asylum to refugees. Here is where a second citizenship would be just priceless. While others are refused entry, having an EU passport would mean you could just board a plane and start over elsewhere while others are refused entry entirely or have to go wherever they offer asylum. Because of this, having updated documents is very important.

    Many Americans fail miserably at this part and just don’t understand how important it is. My parents grew up in Argentina during the 70’s. Even years after the end of the dictatorship, I remember the look on their faces if they forgot their wallet when going out. They were terrified. Back in the day, getting stopped by the police and being caught without your “documentos” meant you weren’t making it back home that night. If you couldn’t prove your ID, you were considered an enemy/extremist/spy. The Triple A (Argentine Anticommunist Alliance) were constantly looking for left wing activists. People have been arrested and tortured just because they had long hair or dressed like hippies. You wanted to be as gray as possible, literally gray, so as to avoid being thrown inside one of the Triple A’s infamous olive green Ford Falcons, never to be seen again.



    9) Cash is king

    Food was still available in Donetsk, but people just didn’t have enough cash to afford it. With inflation being about 30% a month, food prices go up accordingly, so you’re better off with Dollars or Euros rather than local currency. They may not be accepted in some chain stores, but you can exchange them on banks or on the streets at the ongoing currency exchange rate, protecting your savings from inflation and only changing for local currency as needed.

    At one point George1980 said “So my conclusion is so: cash is main tool of survivor!”

    I couldn’t agree more.



    10) Work on your EDC

    The poorest refugees arrive by train and bus, while those with means come by car.
    When bombs began falling close to an elderly woman’s home near Lugansk’s airport, “the granny grabbed her granddaughter, and they jumped on a train and came here with only the clothes on their back,” Shapoval said.
    http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2014/07/02/ukraine-war-refugees/11927955/


    One day it may be all you have to work with. George1980 mentioned how important a good multitool was, how at times it was the only tool he had after leaving Dumbass and moving into an empty flat. This is a actually a great point. I always think of my everyday carry kit in such terms. If the flashlight I have in my pocket right now is the only one I’ll ever have or the one I’ll have to use to get by for years. Which one would I rather have? If my folding knife is the one I’ll have for defending myself, for prying open a window or a door after artillery hits my home or for preparing food, what kind of knife would I like to have? How about having to sell that knife for much needed cash or use it to bribe a Ukraine or Russian soldier in a checkpoint, which knife and multitool would I like to have to bargain with? What if I have to leave with nothing but the clothes on my back, I evacuate on foot with my family, everyone soaking wet, can I start a fire? As a matter of fact, do I even have enough cash to buy bus or train tickets for everyone?



    11) Open an off shore account

    Greece, Ukraine, Iceland, Argentina, doesn’t matter where it is, when things get ugly, the currency starts devaluating and banks close their doors you’ll want an off shore account. Maybe you keep some of your savings there. Maybe you make a transfer just in case when you hear some bad rumors floating around. Transfer fees aren’t very high and its cheap insurance. One thing is for sure: Just like you can’t buy a gun when bad guys are kicking down your front door, you cant open an account in a foreign country just when the local economy is about to go to hell. You need to do these things ahead of time. An offshore bank account means you can keep some of your savings abroad, move money around, move elsewhere and keep you money safe even if your country if falling apart. People in Ukraine sure understand the value of such an asset.


    [​IMG]



    12) Be ready to bug out and know when to do so

    If there is one thing we can learn from the war in Ukraine, as well as war and conflict in other parts of the world, is that not being there is the best thing you can do to ensure your survival and well-being of your family. Always have a bug out abroad plan, no matter who you are or where you live. Just think about it. If you had to leave your country today, (don’t think of all the reasons you wouldn’t, just for a second, think about it as if you didn’t have an option). Where would you go? Do you know someone there that can help you?

    Finally, know when it’s time to leave. This is something I address and emphasize in my book “Bugging Out & Relocating”. It’s about having a plan but also crucial, it’s about executing it at the right time. Those that hesitate, those that choose denial when the signs are all over the place, they may live to regret that. A day too late, an hour too late may make all the difference in the world.


    FerFAL
    [HR][/HR]
    Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the founder of The Modern Survivalist. He started writing about urban survivalism after experiencing first hand the socioeconomic collapse of his country in 2001. The everyday experience of living in Argentina after the collapse provides Fernando a wealth of knowledge that he shares with his readers through his blog and books. He is the author of the widely popular The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse in which he details his first-hand accounts of the hyperinflation and subsequent breakdown of the world around him. His most recent book Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying Put Is Not An Option is based on detailed research and his personal experiences once he decided to leave everything behind.
    [HR][/HR]Also From FerFAL:
    How to Spot the Triggers of a Socioeconomic Collapse
    Preparing for Economic Collapse
    What To Expect From The Government After The Collapse


    http://www.shtfplan.com/emergency-p...information-as-real-world-situations_04182015
     
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    Chemical Warfare: Inspection And Care Of The Mark III And Mark IV Gas Mask 1944 US Navy



    https://youtu.be/2ez6XEyK0_c

    Published on Apr 19, 2015
    more at http://quickfound.net/links/military_...

    "There are few things more useless than a gas mask that leaks..." Includes maintenance tips applicable to gas masks in general.

    US Navy Training Film MN-3584b

    US Navy Training Film playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_vVV8...

    Public domain film from the Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied.
    The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gas_mask

    The gas mask is a mask used to protect the user from inhaling airborne pollutants and toxic gases. The mask forms a sealed cover over the nose and mouth, but may also cover the eyes and other vulnerable soft tissues of the face. Some gas masks are also respirators, though the word gas mask is often used to refer to military equipment (e.g. Field Protective Mask). The user of the gas mask is not protected from gas that the skin can absorb. Most gas mask filters will last around 24 hours in an NBC (nuclear biological chemical) situation.

    Airborne toxic materials may be gaseous (for example sulfur mustard and chlorine gas used in World War I) or particulates (such as many biological agents developed for weapons such as bacteria, viruses and toxins). Many gas masks include protection from both types. Gas masks are used in construction to protect against welding fumes, in deconstruction to protect against asbestos or other hazardous particles, and in the chemical industry when handling hazardous materials, as in making repairs to leaking equipment or cleaning up after spills; workers are usually issued gas masks as a precaution against leaks.

    During demonstrations and protests where tear gas or CS-gas is employed by riot police, gas masks are commonly used by police and demonstrators alike. Aside from serving their functional purposes, gas masks are also used as emblems in industrial music, by graffiti taggers because the mask protects them from the paint canister's toxic fumes, and by urban explorers venturing into environments where hazardous materials, such as asbestos, may be present.

    The traditional gas mask style with two small circular eye windows originated when the only suitable material for these eye windows was glass or acrylic; as glass is notoriously brittle, glass eye windows had to be kept small and thick. Later, the discovery of polycarbonate allowed for gas masks with a big full-face window. Some have one or two filters attached to the face mask while others have a large filter connected to the face mask via a hose...

    Principles of construction

    Absorption is the process of being drawn into a (usually larger) body, or substrate, and adsorption is the process of deposition upon a surface. This can be used to remove both particulate and gaseous hazards. Although some form of reaction may take place, it is not necessary; the method may work by attractive charges, for example, if the target particles are positively charged, use a negatively charged substrate. Examples of substrates include activated carbon, and zeolites. This effect can be very simple and highly effective, for example using a damp cloth to cover the mouth and nose whilst escaping a fire. While this method can be effective at trapping particulates produced by combustion, it does not filter out harmful gases which may be toxic or which displace the oxygen required for survival...

    Safety of old gas masks

    Gas masks have a limited useful lifespan that is related to the absorbent capacity of the filter. Once the filter has been saturated with hazardous chemicals, it ceases to provide protection and the user may be injured...

    World War II gas masks contained blue asbestos in their filters. It is unknown how long for certain the material was used in filters. Breathing blue asbestos in the factories resulted in the death of 10% of the workforce due to pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma...

    Many scare stories have originated from various Russian gas masks and their filters that are now common in surplus stores; the GP-5 was often considered to have an asbestos filter...

    Modern gas masks are quite safe and do not use asbestos, but it is still important to be careful when using a modern gas mask. Typically, masks using 40mm connections are more recent design. Rubber degrades with time, so new in-box "modern type" masks can be cracked and leak. Also, the U.S C2 canister (black) was shown to contain hexavalent chromium: the studies by the U.S. Army Chemical Corps showed that the levels in the filter were acceptable, but show caution when using, as it is a carcinogen...
     
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    COLD WAR NUCLEAR DEFENSE / NORAD HISTORIC FILM "YOUR CIVIL DEFENSE" 28182



    https://youtu.be/V7E_2tFqssk

    Published on Apr 20, 2015
    Featuring Leo Hoegh, the director of the Office of Civil Defense, this historic film discusses the Cold War situation and what might happen if the "forces of Communism" were arrayed against the "forces of Freedom." To counter this threat the United States has arrayed many early warning systems including the DEW Line and NORAD, fallout shelters, counter-strike weapons -- and huge stockpiles of medical, engineering and other supplies buried in underground bunkers. The film makes clear that the survival of every family in a nuclear disaster will rest with individuals, since "the strange menace of fallout" might make it impossible for aid to be delivered by government entities. The film shows a fallout shelter with fully stocked shelves of canned goods, intended to ensure two weeks of survive for a typical family. In this way, national security was equated with personal responsibility.
     
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    1950s CIVIL DEFENSE FALLOUT SHELTER SUPPLIES FILM 129072



    https://youtu.be/bvtQFlwa_l4

    Published on Apr 20, 2015
    Created in the 1950s this film "Public Shelter Supplies" shows the type of fallout shelter provided by the U.S. Government as part of the Civil Defense system. The shelter shown as an example includes medical supplies, food and water and sanitary supplies for fifty people for a week to ten days. The film encourages communities to augment the supplies provided by the government with additional items such as cots, chairs, books (including Bibles), fire extinguishers, and so on.
     
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    A Green Beret’s Guide To Planning Your Personal Posture: “First Things First: Always Be Armed”

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    [TD]Jeremiah Johnson
    April 20th, 2015
    SHTFplan.com


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    Jeremiah Johnson is a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne) and a graduate of the U.S. Army’s SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape).





    The subject of this article is to help you prepare yourselves for an emergency…any emergency, in whatever scope. Many of you are already doing this; however, you may pick up a few useful tips. You may also have some to contribute in the comments section. I wish to be the facilitator of a discussion in this article. I wish very much for you to participate in it. Trust me, I will be taking notes. As I mentioned in my last articles, it is very important to share information and I rely on you, the readership, as well.

    First things first: always be armed. The ones who do not wish you to be armed are those who are armed. Those who are armed place those who are unarmed into work/death camps or kill them outright. What state do you live in? Do you have open carry laws? Do your homework…and then make your own decision. Here is the ultimate concealed carry law:

    Amendment II A well-regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.
    The Constitution of the United States of America, December 15, 1791.
    “…the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.”



    Such is the reason that state after state sees their feeble “concealed carry” laws crumble when challenged: they do not hold water to the Constitution of the United States of America. You need to be armed at all times to increase your chance of survival.

    Let’s talk about some things that may work for you.

    Cargo pants. These are preferred because of what you can stash in them. You can hold an infinite combination of gear in them…a polar-tech cap and a balaclava, a “drive-on” (do) rag – the o.g. Army cravat. You can carry shooting gloves (leather for all-weather) and ear plugs (radians do tell!). With all of these things in the cargoes, there is still plenty of room for the main function: when you change your mags or speed loaders, you can shove the empties in your cargo pockets.

    For ammo, have (depending on your caliber) (1) loaded mag/chambers with hollow-points, and a backup of Buffalo Bore or another type of +P rounds. Such can be switched out when the storm troopers step out of their Tie-fighters/MRAP’s. With pistols, always have one in the hole, and always be scrupulously conscious of it. Before you are dangerous to the bad guys, it would behoove you to not be dangerous to yourself or to other good guys.
    I strongly recommend an “Uncle Mike” type of plastic holster that holds your piece in your beltline, and an additional mag pouch/speed loader pouch on your belt. A good folding knife and a Gerber or Leatherman tool is also strongly recommended. Don’t use them! Keep them in immaculate and serviceable condition. If you need to use tools, use other tools. You want what is on you to be in perfect condition for when conditions are not perfect.

    Good footgear is quite important. Living in Montana, I have my footgear for extreme cold winter weather (Rocky Goretex) and then switch to issue Jungles in the summer, usually black. I also wear desert tan (intermediate cold) issues. Whatever your preference, you need to be able to walk with a load on your back in them and be comfortable as well as have those ankles supported. Quality socks are very important as well. From the time that a grid down/SHTF event happens, you have to be ready to rock and roll immediately! Your survival may depend on how you are dressed/can quick-change into vestments, and how much equipment you have on your person at that time!

    Always have a small flashlight for if the power stops. Two years ago I was in a sporting goods store and there was a large hailstorm going on. All of a sudden the power went out, and there was panic in the store. Whole bunches of elderly people were stumbling around in the basement level, and the management had no backup. JJ, on the other hand, had his trusty mag-lite and led the older people up the stairs to the exits. The whole store shut down: a store full of flashlights and batteries that they wouldn’t use. They weren’t for use, though: they were for sale!


    You see the point: you need your stuff with you and on you.

    Also needed is a reliable lighter (I carry a Zippo and a disposable one). Safety pins: these little lifesavers can be affixed to your hat and on the inside seams of clothing for when you need them. Regarding clothing: what you wear may not be what you can hide very well in. I always wear cargo pants. Always. If I’m in a suit and tie, you can bank on my pants having cargo pockets. I also carry a sweatshirt with hood and a heavier jacket in my vehicle (that blends with the area I may have to run around in).

    Here’s one for you for use with the weapon. Save your produce bags from the grocery store. On a kydex/Uncle Mike’s holster, you can place your weapon in the bag when you’re running around and it will fit snugly in the holster. This will keep dirt, moisture, etc., out of the weapon, and if need be it can be drawn and fired. For long-term stuff, I’m partial to the old Bianchi flap-and-hook style o.g. pistol holster. The latch is great to keep that baby inside of the holster when you’re running in the woods from wolves or through the storm-drains chased by homey the clown and the lollipop-guild.

    Loosely fitting clothing will break up the outline of your body. Also, remember all of the caps and do-rags I mentioned before? A quick disguise is where you find it; need I say more. An old Russian saying: “Do not be a white crow among black crows or you’ll be pecked to death!” Make sure that you blend in as best as you can. Earth tones in your dress if you have to dee-dee into the woods. Balance your tones with the discretion of common sense. Do not try to be a walking Realtree monster right next to downtown city hall.

    Cash on hand is a tough one to call. I believe $100 would be good to carry and not touch under any circumstances for starters. You can also balance this with a little gold or silver in the form of jewelry that you could afford to part with if, say, you needed a ride or a few gallons of gasoline. Do not attempt to be “Mr. T,” nor should you carry around your great-grandfather’s gold pocket watch. Blend in and be inconspicuous; be the “gray” man in the crowd.

    If you wear eyeglasses, you should have a spare pair where you can reach them, or (at the bare minimum) a small repair kit and a tube of super glue to fix them until you’re out of the danger zone. A compass is a good thing; pick one up that’s not going to be useless in the event of EMP. Follow the KISS principle and pick up a good durable liquid-filled one or a Lensatic that can take a beating and still give you a direction. A good P-38 (can-opener, not the Lockheed WWII fighter aircraft) should be a must-have on your key ring. Ballpoint pens and paper (I keep index cards with me) are also handy for your own Intel-keeping or for a message you may need to leave for someone.

    This article is for informational purposes and is not a suggestion or advisement, explicit or implied, from SHTFplan, its writers, or staff, to violate any local, state or federal laws. Contact a lawyer or legal counsel prior to taking any actions as outlined in this article.

    We will cover bags for your vehicles and small carry bags for your person in our next segment. Until then, weigh this information and tailor it according to your needs. Take some time to consider those needs carefully to employ them in a day-to-day practical setting that is both inconspicuous and effective. Take action today, because tomorrow may be too late. Exchange ideas with one another. May the comments section be more packed than a can of sardines, I wish! Have a great day and I look forward to hearing from you!


    [HR][/HR]

    Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson is also a Gunsmith, a Certified Master Herbalist, a Montana Master Food Preserver, and a graduate of the U.S. Army’s SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape). He lives in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with his wife and three cats. You can follow Jeremiah’s regular writings at SHTFplan.com.

    This article may be republished or excerpted with proper attribution to the author and a link to www.SHTFplan.com.



    [HR][/HR]Related Reading:
    A Green Beret’s Guides To Survival and Preparedness (Full List)
    A Green Beret’s Guide To Low-Budget Home-Defense Techniques 101: “Early-Warning Systems and Fortifications”
    A Green Beret’s Guide To Low-Budget-Home-Defense Techniques 102: “Defensive Positions”


    http://www.shtfplan.com/green-beret...e-first-things-first-always-be-armed_04202015
     
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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    CIVIL DEFENSE FILM PUBLIC FALLOUT SHELTER ORGANIZATION AND STAFF 29082



    https://youtu.be/1WxN9PmehLU

    Published on Apr 23, 2015
    Created in 1963 at the height of the Cold War, this Civil Defense training film uses a dramatic premise to show how emergency staff should manage and organize a large public fallout shelter during a crisis. A Shelter Manager is shown immediately taking control of the situation in the shelter, speaking calmly to those who have made it into the facility, closing the door promptly once the shelter is full, and sticking to the "shelter plan" as the situation unfolds. Some of the areas discussed in this nuclear war drama are the safety plan, regular inspections, supervised public entry into shelters, ventilation, first aid, sanitation, fire prevention, decontamination of personnel, and more. "Shelter living is different," the Manager states, "But we have a trained staff that will make your stay in this shelter livable for us all."
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 26, 2015
  20. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Going Rogue: 15 Ways to Detach From the System


    [TABLE]
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    [TD] Tess Pennington
    April 23rd, 2015
    ReadyNutrition.com
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    This article has been contributed by Tess Pennington of ReadyNutrition.com. Tess is the author of the highly acclaimed and best-selling book The Prepper’s Blueprint: The Step-By-Step Guide To Help You Prepare For Any Disaster and the original Prepper’s Cookbook.


    [​IMG]


    I am inspired by the very definition of self-reliance: to be reliant on one’s own capabilities, judgment, or resources. Ultimately, it is the epitome of independence and lays the groundwork of what we are all striving for – to live a life based on our personal principles and beliefs.

    It is a concept rooted in the groundwork that made America great. Being dependent on our own capabilities and resources helped create a strong, plentiful country for so long. That said, the existing country as it is now is entirely different than when it began.


    Why Are We So Dependent?

    It is much too complicated to get into how the “system” was created. That said, the purpose is to enslave through debt and to create an interdependence that will force you and your family to never truly find the freedom you are seeking. It manipulates and convinces you to continue purchasing as a sort of status symbol to make you think you are living the good life; while all along, it has enslaved you further. Wonder why we have all of these holidays where you have to buy gifts? The system needs to be fed and forces you into further enslavement. If you don’t buy into this facilitated spending spree, you are socially shamed.

    Collectively speaking, the contribution from our easy lifestyle and comfort level has created rampant complacency and a population of dependent, self-entitled mediocres. We no longer count on our sound judgement, capabilities and resources. The system keeps everything in working order so we don’t have to depend on ourselves, and furthermore, don’t want to. I realize that many of the readers here do not fall into this collectivism, as you see through the ideological facade and know that the system is fragile and can crumble.

    Breaking away from the system is the only way to avoid the destruction of when it comes crumbling down. When you don’t feed into the manipulation tactics of the system, or enslave yourself to debt, and possess the necessary skills to sustain yourself and your family when large-scale or personal emergencies arise, you will be far better off than those who were dependent on the system. Those who lived during the Great Depression grew up in a time when self-reliance was bred into them and were able to deal with the blow of an economic depression much easier.

    Which side of this would you want to be on? Those who had the patience to learn the necessary skills, ended up surviving more favorably compared to others who went through the trying times of the Depression.


    Develop Personal Dependence

    Now is the time to get your hands dirty, to practice a new mindset, skills, make mistakes and keep learning. Developing personal dependence is no easy feat and requires resolute will power to continue on this long and rambling path. To achieve this you have to begin to break away from the confines of the system. You don’t have to run off to the woods to be the lone wolf. Simply by asking yourself, “Will your choices and the way you spend your time lead to more independence down the road, or will it lead to greater dependence?”, will help you gain a greater perspective into being self-reliant. As well, consider ignoring the convenient system altogether. This will help you to detach yourself from complacency and stretch your abilities and your mindset.

    Most of us can’t move to an off grid location. We have responsibilities that keep us from doing so. Therefore, live according to what is best for you and your family (common sense, I know) and do what you can. My family and I moved to the rural countryside four years ago to pursue a more self-reliant lifestyle. We learned many lessons along the way and are proud of where we are. Am I 100% self-reliant? No. But, I am venturing closer to living more self-reliantly with each skill I learn. Many of my little homesteading, off-grid ventures can be read about here.


    Here’s What You Can Do:


    1. Inform Yourself - Understand that there are events on the horizon, some large-scale and some personal that could wreak havoc on your quest toward a self-reliant lifestyle. Informing yourself and planning for them will be your best in staying ahead of the issue.


    4 Things You Must Eat to Avoid Malnutrition
    Most Likely Ways to Die in a SHTF Event
    End of an Era: Prospects Look Bleak For Slowing the Coming Food Crisis
    Collapse Survivor: “There Was Little Room For Error… Either You Learn Fast Or End Up Dead”
    The Perfect Storm: Grow Local or Grow Hungry?
    GMO Labeling: Will Congress Keep Us in the DARK?



    2. Learn Skills -
    When you can depend on your skills to support you and your family’s life, then the outside world doesn’t affect you as much. When large groups of people in a general area possess self-reliant skills, it makes your community stronger.


    Doing the Stuff Network
    10 Skills Necessary For Survival
    49 Outdoor Skills and Projects to Try


    As well, look into these DIY projects found on Ready Nutrition


    3. Get Out of Debt –
    It is paramount that each of us begin actively practicing economic self-discipline. Many believe that because of the ease in money confiscations from the banks, you shouldn’t have all of your money stashed there. Diversifying your money and investing in long-term ways to preserve your wealth will ensure you have multiple ways to pay the bills.


    How To Break Up With Your Bank
    Buy Commodities at Today’s Lower Prices, Consume at Tomorrow’s Higher Prices
    Money and Wealth Preservation During Times of Uncertainty and Instability
    How to Use Ebay to Find the Most Affordable Silver
    Silver Bullion or Junk Silver for Long-term Bartering?
    5 Reasons Why There Is Security In Seeds



    4. Store food -
    Having a supply of food to subsist on in times of dire circumstances ensures that you are not dependent on having your basic needs met by someone else. This gives you the control of what food to put in your body and how you want to live.

    25 Must Have Survival Foods: Put Them In Your Pantry Now
    11 Emergency Food Items That Can Last a Lifetime
    Best Practices For Long Term Food Storage
    Meet Your Emergency Food’s Worst Enemies
    Buy The Prepper’s Cookbook
    Creating a Bug Out Meal Plan



    5. Start raising your own food –
    With the high prices of meat at the store these days, many are turning to raising their own meat sources. Rabbits, chickens and fish can easily be started in backyard homesteads.


    How Micro Livestock Can Be Used For Suburban and Rural Sustainability
    What to Feed Your Livestock
    Child-Friendly Livestock
    Waste Not, Want Not: How To Use EVERY Single Part Of An Animal



    6. Prepare for emergencies -
    Preparing for the unlikely emergencies is a way to insulate yourself from the aftermath. The simplest way to begin preparing is to prepare for the most likely events that can affect you, and go from there.


    FREE Emergency Preparedness Guide: 52-Weeks to Preparedness
    Anatomy of a Breakdown
    SHTF Survival: 10 Survival Tools That Should Be In Your Survival Pack
    5 Reasons You Should be Preparing
    Buy The Prepper’s Blueprint: A Step-By-Step Guide to Prepare You For Any Disaster
    Six Ways You Can Keep Yourself Alive With Animal Bones


    7. Repurpose -
    We must take steps to stop being a throw away society and get back to a population who makes do with what they have.


    50 Things You Should Stop Buying and Start Making
    5 Ways to Make Candles from Household Items
    Survival Uses for Household Items
    SHTF Planning: 7 Ways to Use The Items Around You To Adapt and Survive
    Composting 101


    8. Make Your Own Supplies -
    You have everything around you to survive, but many can’t look outside of the box to see how they can use what they have to survive. Having versatile preparedness supplies saves space and can serve multiple uses that can double up as ingredients to make soaps, medical supplies, etc.


    Make soap
    3 Ways to Naturally Make Yeast
    10 Dehydrator Meals for Your Prepper Pantry
    Make Your Own MREs
    SHTF Survival: How to Prevent Infections
    7 Kitchen Essentials That Deserve To Be On Your Preparedness Shelves


    9. Use Up What You Already Have or Find Another Use -
    Being self-reliant means using up what already have. This is a crucial principle of being self-dependent. Saving leftover construction supplies, food, clothing, etc., can be reused for another day.


    Why Everyone Should Have a Rag Bag
    8 Slow Cooker Meals Made From Leftovers
    10 Household Products You Never Have To Buy Again
    Complementing Your Food Storage Pantry with Dehydrated Foods
    Five Essential Tools for Fixing Your Clothes on the Cheap


    10. Live More Naturally –
    Life is chaotic these days and many of us feel we have to keep up with everyone else. It’s time to forget that and start living more simply and naturally.


    Simply Simplify
    7 Off Grid Projects for Survivalists
    Self-Reliance in 4 Steps
    Five Eco Friendly Alternatives For Emergency Preparedness


    11. Grow Your Own Medicine -
    With the vast medical advancements in the Western world, we are turning our backs on the first medicine – natural medicine. It’s time we begun exploring a more mindful, natural existence.


    30 Most Popular Herbs for Natural Medicine
    Step-By-Step Guide to Making Colloidal Silver
    Essential Oils for SHTF Medical Care
    How to Make Dakin’s Solution for SHTF Medical Care


    12. Grow Your Own Food -
    The cost of making healthy decisions about the food we put into our body is eating our budgets alive. We want the very best foods for our family, but buying solely organic products can be costly. All the while, you are questioning the legitimacy of this produce. Is it genetically modified? Where was this grown?

    Was it exposed to salmonella or another food-borne pathogens? What was the type of water used to grow it?

    There comes a time when you want to throw your hands up and shout, “That’s it, I’m doing this myself.”


    7 Laws of Gardening
    25 Survival Seeds You Need For Your Garden
    10 Foods You Should Not Feed Your Chickens
    Medicinal Plants for the Survival Garden
    6 Essential Food Types To Grow Your Own Food Pantry
    Make Your Own Herbal Tea Blends


    13. Be Flexible -
    I often tell those who are preparing that the single most important thing you can do is continue to be flexible in your preparedness efforts. Doing so gives you leeway in your planning and backup planning, as well as helps you move more fluidly through the aftermath. This concept can be applied in non-emergencies, as well. Self-reliance can help us be more flexible in our life and our decisions.


    Survival of the Most Adaptable
    8 Prepper Principles For a Prepared Mind
    Blending In: The Secret to Keeping The Target Off Your Back
    5 Survivor Traits That Make a Prepper Successful
    5 Steps to Become the Smartest Person in the Woods


    14. Barter Better
    – Bartering for goods and services was the first currency that went around. Let’s be honest, everyone is up for a good deal. Using self-reliant skills, you can use these as leverage in bartering. As well, having a surplus of survival/preparedness items can also help you make good bartering deals.


    The Barter Value of Skills
    A Free Falling Economy Makes Bartering Go Boom
    100 Must Have Survival Items


    15. Teach Your Kids
    – We must teach our children how to be more mindful and self-reliant. After all, we do not want to continue the cycle of having a dependent, self-entitled population. By informing them, we are setting them upon a self-sustaining path for life.

    How Farmers Markets Can Teach Your Kids the Values of Local Food and Community Building

    We must come to the understanding that there is no true safety net for us to fall into; it’s up to ourselves to get us out trouble. How easily you land depends on how reliant you were to begin with. Adopting certain concepts as your new life’s code will help you on your path.

    Many of us share a common goal: to be free from the shackles of the system. This goal doesn’t come over night.

    You have to work at it, invest in it and ultimately, change your way of thinking. The point is, we are all at different places in our preparedness efforts, so don’t get discouraged! Continue on the pace, keep learning and step-by-step, you inch closer and closer to that goal.


    http://www.shtfplan.com/headline-news/going-rogue-15-ways-to-detach-from-the-system_04232015
     
  21. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    CIVIL DEFENSE & DISASTER RESPONSE FILM "FACTS MAKE THE DIFFERENCE" 29112



    https://youtu.be/zVFyyErIr0w

    Published on Apr 24, 2015
    Created in 1966, "Facts Make the Difference" is training film for Civil Defense personnel which examines the importance of collecting information and fact finding during a disaster, so that resources can be appropriately allocated.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 26, 2015
  22. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    *Continued from post #17

    [h=1]A Green Beret’s Guide To Action Bags: “Your Go-To-Kit When You Have To Pop Smoke & Depart In a Rapid Manner”[/h]
    [TABLE]
    [TR]
    [TD="width: 240"]Jeremiah Johnson
    April 25th, 2015
    SHTFplan.com


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    Jeremiah Johnson is a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne) and a graduate of the U.S. Army’s SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape).


    This Green Beret’s Guide is Part 2 of the ‘Day To Day Stance: Planning Your Personal Posture’ series. You can read Part 1 of this series by clicking here.



    [​IMG]



    Day-to-Day Stance: Planning Your Personal Posture (Part 2)

    By Jeremiah Johnson


    Today we will cover some approaches to A-bags (or “Bug-out Bags” if you prefer) and specialty bags for your person and vehicle. Hopefully after Part 1 you took a look at your own posture and assessed it for its strengths and for areas you wish to improve upon it. I digress for one second and stress this concept: it is self-assessment that takes priority, and you must be both realistic and objective in assessing all things and actions under your control.

    You may be single, may have others who rely on you (children, elderly) to be the “point man,” or your family depends on your function within it (as a dependable “cog” in the family’s “engine,” so to speak). I also invite all of you to participate in the discussion in the comments and share your way, your particular “idiosyncrasies” and leanings for the A-bags. There is no true right or wrong except as weighed by your paradigm and your needs. The needs are as varied as the human race; rarely will the needs of two individuals be identical.

    The A-bag is your “action bag,” your go-to kit to grab when you have to pop smoke and depart from the AO in a rapid manner. You can have more than one A-bag and it is advisable, depending on the manner in which you live, your geographical area, and your needs. One can be kept in your vehicle. One should be kept in each vehicle. That is a good minimum standard for you to follow, the more the merrier, as it fits your needs and budget. Do you have an office, a work-locker, and a spot under a counter or in a corner that you can use? Throw a second one there; the more the merrier.

    The reason that you want these “second” A-bags for your work/occupation is that you shouldn’t be dragging them back and forth from the vehicles all the time where others can see. If you have a work locker that can be padlocked, then by all means, stash a bag within it. Each bag should be (by your preference, assessment, and capabilities) between 10-20 lbs: not too heavy, yet with enough basics to pull you through an initial event when the SHTF. For those who cannot tote one of these on their backs for physical reasons, I highly recommend one of those little travel dollies for luggage. They are compact and fold up to stash right next to the A-bag.

    All of your bags should be standardized if they’re in multiples (such as one in your wife’s car, one in her office, one in your blazer, and one in your employee locker). By standardized, I mean they should be all the same, exact type of carry bag, a small backpack is preferable. The reason is because each bag should hold a diagram and a list of contents by location; anyone should be able to read the diagram and find the equipment as listed upon it. The diagram included should be of the backpack with the compartments clearly drawn on it. All pouches and compartments of the backpack are assigned an identifier (letter, number, etc.), and each compartment has a list of contents.

    By standardizing your A-bags, it takes the guesswork away from you and your family about what things are where. The diagram with list is the refresher to that and can be used for others if necessary. Case in point: you and your family know what is in the middle compartment, but what about Cousin Richard who is visiting from Alaska? Cousin Richard is downtown with you, an EMP goes off, and you have a head-on collision with a bus. You tell Cousin Richard about the A-bag in your trunk and then pass out. Richard can then find the diagram and use what is in the bag to help you, or to help him if (God forbid) you buy the farm.

    The point is that a trusted but non-immediate family member or a friend will be able to use the bag and its supplies without dumping it all over the place to “explore” for supplies. Everything should be noted on the list and the list should be updated every 6 months or so as you PMCS (preventative maintenance checks and services) your supplies and foodstuffs for accountability and serviceability. I’m going to list for you the contents of my bag and the reasons included/function of the object (if not self-explanatory).


    Note: an asterisk (*) denotes an object to be in a Ziploc or plastic bag; more than one asterisk denotes multiple bags being used.


    JJ’s A-bag – Contents
    (1) 2 ½ oz can sterno in (1) plastic bag
    Cooking, heating/boiling water
    First Aid: *
    (1) Celox kit (box): with 2”x2” gauze, adhesive bandages, Ibuprofen, antiseptic towelettes, and 2 packets of celox [note: this is quick-clot for wounds]
    (2) (1) 6”x 6” field dressing
    (3) (1) 10-hr hothands hand warmer
    Heat, to warm IV bags, or to thaw water
    (4) (1) tube Neosporin
    (5) (1) roll medical tape
    (1) aluminum water bottle
    If the water freezes, I can thaw it with fire
    (1) white kitchen garbage bag + rubber band
    Ground cover or camo. – Winter
    (2) chemlights, blue
    (1) Bic lighter *
    (1) pen and (1) Carpenter’s pencil
    Note: pencil is sturdy and very easily sharpened



    Foodstuffs: ***

    (3) Energy boost Vitamin C tubes
    Note: 1 tube of powder, divide to 4 x RDA
    (1) 7 oz bag sunflower seeds
    (4) honey and sesame candies
    (6) 2 oz beefsteak beef jerky
    (7) multivitamins
    (1) 4 oz bag pretzels
    (1) 15 oz can beefaroni
    Note: Cans are heavy; I’ll forage, & eat dried foods
    (2) ½ oz fruit chews
    (1) pr black socks **
    (1) folded up section of newspaper*
    For quick fire starter
    (1) fork/spoon/pocketknife
    “Hobo” tool: eating utensils attached
    (1) film canister bottle, holding: (1) spool tripwire, and (1) pack of matches
    (1) handkerchief (white)
    (1) sewing kit: needles, safety pins, 3 small spools, tiny pair of scissors, thimble
    (1) lockblade pocketknife
    (1) Magnesium fire starter
    (1) magnifying glass
    (1) bottle water purification tabs
    (1) hand crank flashlight
    (1) very lightweight sleeping bag in 2 trash bags (waterproofing)
    (1) folding saw in sheath
    (1) 30’ tape measure
    A must have in JJ’s book; all of my bags have ‘em

    “….and darling, most of all…”
    100 rds – type “A” (for JJ)
    10 rds – gauge “B” (for JJ) ****Note: all of this is in plastic bags
    20 rds – type “C” (backup for JJ)
    25 rds – type “D” (for Mrs. JJ)

    The A-bag itself is not obsequious in any regard, and would not “stick out as a sore thumb” in an urban or suburban setting. It weighs 18 lbs and I have waterproofed everything in it. So now we have covered A-bags. Let us talk about specialty bags and what they can be used for.

    A specialty bag is just that: a bag that carries equipment for either one particular or multiple specialized functions. The special function doesn’t necessarily need to be a particular task; its specialty can lie in the climactic or geographical need based on season, terrain, time of day, etc. The specialty bag can complement the A-bag in your vehicle and need not be standardized. I will tell you about mine.

    JJ’s specialty bag is an army desert camo backpack. It contains the following items:


    1. Yak-tracks (these are rubber slip-on harnesses with coils of steel for the bottom of shoes/boots) which are a must have in Montana if you want to run on ice….which means if you want to run anywhere in Montana between October to March.
    2. Flashlight
    3. Goggles, tinted (complete 400% UV rating): protect the eyes when -20º F, and especially from snow-glare
    4. Poncho (Army issue)
    5. Backup piece and “BB”s
    6. Fanny pack with small tools (micro and macro screwdrivers, knife, tripwire, fire starting material, matches, lighters, medical scissors, compass)
    7. Maps of my immediate area: very detailed (road and topo) that cover my location for a radius of 100 miles.
    8. Climbing rope, Swiss seat, ascenders, and d-rings (note: for these, either make sure they’re GI (government issue) or from a good climbing store).
    9. (1) roll 100-mph tape, og, (1) roll duct tape, (1) roll HVAC aluminum tape
    10. (1) polypro socks, (1) set of long john’s [must haves in Montana until June]


    All of this stuff weighs about 12 lbs. Now, keep in mind, this is a general-purpose Specialty bag that adds some items in the summer. I say “adds” because I have a rule you may wish to use that follows the principle of “better too much than not enough.”

    JJ’s rule: The mountains are always cold and always have snow. Keep all gear ready to head into the mountains in the wintertime and in the summer just add what you need for the summertime.

    Remember: we’re covering A-bags and Specialty bags, NOT your rucksack. We will be covering Rucksacks in Part 3. There are other Specialty bags that, although I won’t give complete contents lists, I’ll give you some examples as well as suggest short lists. These may help enable you to come up with some ideas that meet your needs:




    • For those in an urban setting: climbing ropes, ascenders, gloves, rock hammers, pitons, and a Swiss seat. [what if you’re in a five-story building and it’s on fire?] Remember, you also better know how to climb/mountaineer and use your equipment!
    • What is your occupation? This will enable you perhaps to be more inconspicuous with your specialty bag (tools wouldn’t look out of place on a construction site, or a maintenance facility, for example)
    • Family special needs: Does someone in your family need special medications or clothing? Is there anyone with asthma or COPD? A special bag just for them would expedite things in the event of an emergency, such as inhalers or a small oxygen bottle, or other supplies such as nasal cannulae, bee sting kits, diabetes supplies, and so on.
    • A really good medical aid-bag (Army Medic, for example), fully stocked and ready to go with splints, braces, etc.)



    So that will cover things for starters. Any suggestions? Fill that comments section and let’s pick up some “cross-chatter” and discuss some good things that you guys and gals have learned. Just remember to not procrastinate if you do not have an A-bag made: you never know when you’re going to need it. Whether you’re being hunted for food by zombies as in “World War Z,” being chased by Homey-the-Clown and thugs with civil rioting, or whether the EMP has struck, a good A-bag and equipment can give you a better chance for success…and survival. Don’t wait to find/scrounge the tools you need. Pack it in yourself and stay ahead of the game.

    I look forward to hearing from each of you, and hope you have a nice day!


    [HR][/HR]

    Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson is also a Gunsmith, a Certified Master Herbalist, a Montana Master Food Preserver, and a graduate of the U.S. Army’s SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape). He lives in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with his wife and three cats. You can follow Jeremiah’s regular writings at SHTFplan.com.

    This article may be republished or excerpted with proper attribution to the author and a link to www.SHTFplan.com.


    [HR][/HR]

    Related Reading:

    A Green Beret’s Guides To Survival and Preparedness (Full List)
    A Green Beret’s Guide To Low-Budget Home-Defense Techniques 101: “Early-Warning Systems and Fortifications”
    A Green Beret’s Guide To Low-Budget-Home-Defense Techniques 102: “Defensive Positions”
    A Green Beret’s Guide To Planning Your Personal Posture: “First Things First: Always Be Armed”


    http://www.shtfplan.com/green-beret...o-pop-smoke-depart-in-a-rapid-manner_04252015
     
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    Desert Survival: "Land and Live in the Desert" 1945 US Army Air Forces Training Film



    https://youtu.be/aR3KirgaNgY

    Published on Apr 26, 2015
    more at http://outdoor-gear.quickfound.net/

    "This film dramatizes the survival of the crew of a downed military aircraft in the desert. The soldiers learned methods of conserving water, providing shelter, and signaling for help. The film features Craig Stevens and is narrated by Van Heflin. National Archives Identifier: 5686919."

    US Army Air Forces Training Film TF1-3346

    Public domain film from the Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied.
    The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/336th_Tr...

    The 336th Training Group is a United States Air Force group with the mission to provide Air Force survival training. The group is located at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, with one subordinate unit at Naval Air Station Pensacola, FL, and one at Eielson Air Force Base, AK.

    The unit's historical lineage goes back to the 336th Bombardment Group which was a World War II United States Army Air Forces training organization. It served in the United States during World War II...

    Overview

    The 336th TG operates the U.S. Air Force Survival School. The school provides instruction in Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape (SERE) training primarily to aircrew members. Instruction concentrates on the principles, techniques, and skills necessary to survive in any environment and return with honor...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desert

    A desert is a barren area of land where little precipitation occurs and consequently living conditions are hostile for plant and animal life. The lack of vegetation exposes the unprotected surface of the ground to the processes of denudation. About one third of the land surface of the world is arid or semi-arid. This includes much of the polar regions where little precipitation occurs and which are sometimes called "cold deserts". Deserts can be classified by the amount of precipitation that falls, by the temperature that prevails, by the causes of desertification or by their geographical location.

    Deserts are formed by weathering processes as large variations in temperature between day and night put strains on the rocks which consequently break in pieces. Although rain seldom occurs in deserts, there are occasional downpours...

    Plants and animals living in the desert need special adaptations to survive in the harsh environment. Plants tend to be tough and wiry with small or no leaves, water-resistant cuticles and often spines to deter herbivory. Some annual plants germinate, bloom and die in the course of a few weeks after rainfall while other long-lived plants survive for years and have deep root systems able to tap underground moisture. Animals need to keep cool and find enough food and water to survive. Many are nocturnal and stay in the shade or underground during the heat of the day. They tend to be efficient at conserving water, extracting most of their needs from their food and concentrating their urine. Some animals remain in a state of dormancy for long periods, ready to become active again when the rare rains fall. They then reproduce rapidly while conditions are favorable before returning to dormancy.

    People have struggled to live in deserts and the surrounding semi-arid lands for millennia. Nomads have moved their flocks and herds to wherever grazing is available and oases have provided opportunities for a more settled way of life. The cultivation of semi-arid regions encourages erosion of soil and is one of the causes of increased desertification. Desert farming is possible with the aid of irrigation and the Imperial Valley in California provides an example of how previously barren land can be made productive by the import of water from an outside source. Many trade routes have been forged across deserts, especially across the Sahara Desert, and traditionally were used by caravans of camels carrying salt, gold, ivory and other goods. Large numbers of slaves were also taken northwards across the Sahara. Some mineral extraction also takes place in deserts and the uninterrupted sunlight gives potential for the capture of large quantities of solar energy...
     
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    A Commercial Diver’s Guide to Emergency Preparedness, by A. Diver




    Right now you might be thinking, “Why did he use the phrase ‘emergency preparedness’ instead of ‘prepping’?” The answer is really simple; “prepping” has a negative connotation in this world. While the rest of the world has been in survival mode for a long time, Americans have been living in the lap of luxury. This world of convenience that we have made for ourselves has made us fat, naive, and lazy. This “lap of luxury” lifestyle has also made us complacent. We take things as they are and expect everything will be alright. If you are reading this, you have either already broken out of that mold or are ready to do so. Now what? How do you go about getting yourself ready for what is to come? That is what I am going to try to lay out for you here.

    Let’s talk about commercial diving for a minute, so you can understand where I am coming from. Divers get on a boat with limited resources. They go out to the middle of the ocean, where help is hours, if not days, away. They go underwater, where visibility is usually non-existent, and perform a task that most people are not skilled enough to do. Sound familiar? If you have been thinking about getting prepared for an emergency of a large magnitude, this is exactly where you will be– out in the middle of nowhere with nothing but what you have brought with you. Help will be far away, if not non-existent. Few will be qualified to operate in this environment. See the parallels? So how do you become a person who will be qualified to operate in such a bad situation? The answer is one step at a time. Chinese philosopher Laozi once stated, “A journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.” This is that step.

    Why Do We Prepare

    We, as Christians, may ask ourselves why we would bother to prepare. God will give us what we need and will call us home when he sees fit, right? I believe that God will give us what we need to survive, but how will He do it? I would have nothing but for the grace of God, but when I wake up in the morning there is not a plate of bacon and eggs sitting on the table waiting for me. There is, however, bacon and eggs in the fridge waiting to be fried up. This is God’s grace. He has given me the ability and sense to educate myself on how to acquire what I need to survive. This is how God has provided. This is what I call the conservative view of Christianity. The liberal view is believing that all thing will just be given to you without any effort on your part. I believe we all have been put on this earth to accomplish a task. I am not egotistical enough to think I know what God has planned for me or when I will be done with my assignment. I do know that when I finish my work that I have been put here to do, God will call me home. I prepare so that I can make the time between now and then comfortable for my family and myself. If my time to go home is 30 years from now, I want to live that time as comfortably as possible while I work on whatever God has put me here to do.

    Let’s Mob Out

    Mobilization, or mob, is what a boat does to get ready for a job. In this case, our job is to survive as easily and comfortably as possible. We first need to take stock of what is required to perform the job and compare it to what we already have. Preparedness gurus often refer to the “3 B’s”– beans, bullets, and Band-Aids. Each prepper is different in the order of importance they apply to each of the “3 B’s”. I believe that they are all equally important. Without beans (food), you will not have the energy to survive and will soon be one of the unprepared. Without bullets, you will have no way to protect yourself from the unprepared and will soon find that your beans have been taken. Finally, without Band-Aids (medical supplies), you will not remain healthy enough to survive. This is all great, but as far as I am concerned these follow behind a left out 4th “B”– brothers. Without brothers (like-minded people who can help you survive), you can have all of the previous 3 B’s and still find yourself wanting. Everyone has to sleep. That is a fact. Who is going to watch your back, while you sleep? You need others to help you protect yourself and your “preps”. Humans also need companionship. Without human interaction, you will become “the old cat lady at the end of the block”. So, the first step is to find/start a group. Believe it or not, everyone knows a “prepper”. We are everywhere, in all walks of life; we are doctors, businessmen, mechanics, and farmers. The trick is to find that person/group and align yourself with them. I will not pretend to be an expert on this. I fell into my group by divine intervention. God placed me where I needed to be and was needed. I still took the steps (conservative Christianity) to engage the person I knew could help me, but God put me in the position to be able to do that. There are prepper communities online, but I would carefully vet any potential partners with whom you don’t already have a relationship. In short, find yourself a group, engage that group, and prepare with that group.

    So, the next thing is to evaluate our “B’s”. “But I don’t have any food stored.” I know you don’t. Most people have about three days’ worth of food in the pantry. This is not ideal for what we are talking about. Fortunately, having food is not the entire scope of having “beans”. What happens when that food runs out? This is where many of you might have something that others do not have. Did you garden with your grandmother when you were a kid? Did you learn how to can? Do you know how to raise chickens? These will come in handy when you need them most. Take stock of what you have in relation to the “4 B’s”, and then list what you will need. By starting with what you do have, while remembering that knowledge is extremely valuable, you can make what you don’t have less overwhelming.

    Transit to Location

    When I say transit to location, I mean getting to where the job is. Remember, the job is survival. Now that you have taken inventory of what you do have and listed what you don’t have, it is time to start collecting what you will need in the future. This can be a daunting task. If you decided you want to do it all at once, then you need to realize that it will be a big hit to the pocket book. If you feel you have time, you can do it slowly and spread out the expense.

    Brothers

    Find your group. Make sure they are someone you can trust and that the two (or more) of you will benefit from each other. Enough said.

    Beans

    Survival food can be EXPENSIVE. However, if you know how to can and grow a garden, you can put up your own survival food. If you don’t know how to can or garden, now is the time to learn. You can start building up your supply of food by buying an extra can of beans or corn the next time you go to the grocery store. This is a slow way of building up the food stores, but an extra can of beans in the cupboard is an extra can of beans in the cupboard. Another way of stocking up of survival food is to take advantage of the survival experts– the Mormons. The Mormons operate a store that sells food staples packaged for long-term storage at a reasonable price. Some wards allow non-Latter Day Saints members to shop there. I have one near me, and they have been a life saver (literally). Check out online where the closest LDS store is, contact them, and see if they will let you shop there. If not, there is an LDS store online that will let you. I recently completed an LDS order form and spent exactly $100. For that $100, I was able to obtain 80.6 pounds of food. I purchased 5.4 pounds of dried milk and 10 plastic lids to go on top of the cans that the food is packed in, once they are open.

    Bullets

    Get a gun, learn to shoot, and become proficient. I cannot stress this enough. A gun is of no use to you if you don’t know how to use it and use it well. If you are scared of guns, get over it. Guns are not dangerous, but the person behind the gun can be. If you don’t have a family member who can teach you how to shoot, there are plenty of places that will teach a novice how to use a gun. If you are a woman, some gun ranges have ladies-only classes and ladies nights. When you choose a gun, choose something in a common caliber. Choosing a gun that shoots a bullet only made in Russia will do you no good when you run out of bullets. You will not be able to find bullets to protect yourself, and a gun without bullets is just an expensive paperweight.

    Band-Aids

    This is a topic near and dear to my heart. My wife is a nurse. Every group should have a medical professional as a member. Doctors, nurses, EMTs, paramedics, and even a veterinarian can be a huge benefit to you and your group, but every member should have advanced first-aid training. What happens if the doctor gets sick? Find a CPR and first aid class, and get certified. Once you have basic first-aid, find a wilderness and remote first aid class and get certified. Take what you learn from those classes and build a first aid kit that matches your abilities. If there is something that you think you need but don’t know how to use, get it anyway. You may come across someone who does know how to use it. Stock up on antibiotics. “But my Dr. tells me I have to take all of the antibiotics when I am sick.” Your doctor is right. Get fish antibiotics. Fish antibiotics are the same thing that we are prescribed, but they’re labeled “not for human consumption”. This means they can be sold over the counter without a prescription. They work. I know because I have personally tested them.

    Time to Dive

    Now it is time to do the work. You have found a group of like-minded people, have figured out what skills and supplies you have and are lacking, started accumulating supplies and knowledge (in my opinion you will never be done with this) to fill in the gaps, and have your preps ready. Now the unthinkable happens and it is time to go. Hopefully, in your supplies, you have enough gas to fill up your car. In a major power outage, you won’t be able to get gas. Fill up your car, pack your car, load your gun, and head to the group meeting place. Hopefully, you have figured out that things were about to get bad before things actually got bad. If so, take your time, be methodical, and get ready to leave. Make sure you know more than one way to get to your meeting location. You never know when a road will be blocked or under construction. Blend in; don’t look overly prepared. If you look like you have something that someone else wants, you become a target. The last thing you want is to be a target in a world without rules. Just stay calm and do what you have been preparing to do.

    Decompression

    Decompression is the time after a dive where you let your body normalize. Unfortunately, in my humble opinion, this is not going to be an option. As far as I can tell, we will never be back to “normal” again. Working the land to feed our family will become the new norm. Standing watch in the middle of the night so marauding bands of the unprepared don’t try to take your preps will be the new normal. This is something that I have had to come to grips with. My daughter may never go to prom, but she will be with her family and alive. Hopefully, if I have done my job correctly, we will not just survive, we will thrive. If you take your preparedness seriously and be methodical about it, you too will have a chance to thrive. I know it can seem like a daunting task, but if you just take it one step at a time, preparing will soon become second nature. Good luck, and may God bless you and your family.



    http://survivalblog.com/a-commercial-divers-guide-to-emergency-preparedness-by-a-diver/
     
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    ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE PLANE CRASH SURVIVAL FILM "NO TIME TO LOSE" 28242



    https://youtu.be/3HJH5yC1_-g

    Published on Apr 30, 2015
    This Royal Canadian Air Force film shows a military plane crash and its aftermath, with one uninjured crewman doing his best to keep injured cohorts alive until help arrives. The title of the film is not certain (because the opening title is missing!) but we believe it is called "No Time to Lose". The scenario unfolds as the plane's crew, already low on fuel and with an engine out, learns that their base is completely fogged in. Moments later a second engine failure dooms the plane, and the crew prepares to make a crash landing.

    The aircraft seen in the film DG-641, appears to be a real crashed airplane but so far we've been unable to identify it. If you have any information please leave it in comments below.

    The film has many similarities to a production of the USAF entitled "Live and Land in the Arctic".
     
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    Urban Preppers VS Rural Preppers



    https://youtu.be/kHwbwFVgsgY

    Published on May 5, 2015
    I HOPE I DIDN'T FORGET ANYONE! Watch the whole video as you may just be in it!
     
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    Nuclear Attack Preparedness Procedures: Survive to Fight 1968 US Air Force Training Film



    https://youtu.be/G6D7gaVSvpk

    Published on May 6, 2015
    more at: http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviatio...

    "DRAMATIZES ACTIVITIES AT AN AIR FORCE BASE FOLLOWING NUCLEAR ATTACK. REVIEWS STATUS OF BASE AND ITS OPERATIONAL CAPABILITY TO SURVIVE. SHOWS COMMAND POST OPERATIONS, REPORTING OF DAMAGE, AND DISPATCHING OF VEHICLES. PICTURES FAST MOVING OPERATIONS THAT INCLUDE RUNWAY CLEARINGS AND ABANDONING OF BUILDINGS. EMPHASIZES HARDENING PROCESS OF BASE FOR BATTLE. SHOWS MEDICAL PERSONNEL ASSISTING IN EXPOSURE CONTROL AND TREATING PATIENTS. CONCLUDES WITH INITIAL RECOVERY BEING COMPLETED, RAMP WASHDOWN, AND REPORTING BASE OPERATIONAL."

    US Air Force Training Film TF-6119

    Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied.
    The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_...

    Nuclear warfare (sometimes atomic warfare or thermonuclear warfare) is a military conflict or political strategy in which nuclear weaponry is used to inflict damage on the enemy. Compared to conventional warfare, nuclear warfare can be vastly more destructive in range and extent of damage, and in a much shorter time. A major nuclear exchange would have long-term effects, primarily from the fallout released, and could also lead to a "nuclear winter" that could last for decades, centuries, or even millennia after the initial attack. Some analysts claim that with this potential nuclear winter side-effect of a nuclear war almost every human on Earth could starve to death. Other analysts, who dismiss the nuclear winter hypothesis, calculate that with nuclear weapon stockpiles at Cold War highs, in a surprise countervalue global nuclear war, billions of casualties would have resulted but billions of people would nevertheless have survived.

    Only two nuclear weapons have been used in the course of warfare, both by the United States near the end of World War II. On August 6, 1945, a uranium gun-type device (code name "Little Boy") was detonated over the Japanese city of Hiroshima. Three days later, on August 9, a plutonium implosion-type device (code name "Fat Man") was detonated over the Japanese city of Nagasaki. These two bombings resulted in the deaths of approximately 129,000 civilians and military personnel.

    After World War II, nuclear weapons were also developed by the Soviet Union (1949), the United Kingdom (1952), France (1960), and the People's Republic of China (1964), which contributed to the state of conflict and extreme tension that became known as the Cold War. In 1974, India, and in 1998, Pakistan, two countries that were openly hostile toward each other, developed nuclear weapons. Israel (1960s) and North Korea (2006) are also thought to have developed stocks of nuclear weapons, but their governments have never admitted to having nuclear weapons...

    Nuclear weapons have been detonated on over two thousand occasions for testing purposes and demonstrations.

    After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 and the resultant end of the Cold War, the threat of a major nuclear war between the two nuclear superpowers was generally thought to have declined. Since then, concern over nuclear weapons has shifted to the prevention of localized nuclear conflicts resulting from nuclear proliferation, and the threat of nuclear terrorism...

    Survival

    The predictions of the effects of a major countervalue nuclear exchange include millions of city dweller deaths within a short period of time...

    To avoid injury and death from a nuclear weapons heat flash and blast effects, the two most far ranging prompt effects of nuclear weapons, schoolchildren were taught to duck and cover by the early Cold War film of the same name...

    Prussian blue, or "Radiogardase", is stockpiled in the US, along with potassium iodide and DPTA as pharmaceuticals useful in treating internal exposure to harmful radioisotopes in fallout....

    ...Many countries maintain plans for continuity of government and continuity of operations following a nuclear attack or similar disasters. These range from a designated survivor, intended to ensure survival of some form of government leadership, to the Soviet Dead Hand system, which allows for retaliation even if all Soviet leadership were destroyed. Nuclear submarines are given letters of last resort; orders on what action to take in the event that an enemy nuclear strike has destroyed the government.

    The Soviet government believed they could win not only a strategic nuclear war, which they planned to absorb with their extensive Civil Defense schemes and infrastructure dispersal, but also the conventional war that they predicted would follow after their strategic nuclear arsenal had been depleted...
     
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    Yes! There’s a FM radio in your phone… but they don’t let you use it.



    https://youtu.be/5MJn5pI5XNw

    Published on May 6, 2015
    Take Action!! http://freeradioonmyphone.org/
    Moto G in Amazon http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00K...

    My Two Books In Amazon!!
    "The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse"
    http://www.amazon.com/dp/9870563457?t...
    "Bugging Out And Relocating"
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1482...

    Website:
    http://www.themodernsurvivalist.com
    http://www.ferfal.blogspot.com
     
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    Special Request Article: A Green Beret’s Guide To Relocation and Sustainability: “It Will Take Some Serious Planning”



    Mac Slavo
    May 15th, 2015
    SHTFplan.com



    Jeremiah Johnson is a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne) and a graduate of the U.S. Army’s SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape).

    Note: This article is dedicated to Earth Angel


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    Hey there readers in SHTF land, how are you doing? This article is headed with the words, “Special Request.” From now on, when you guys and gals see this in either the title or at the article’s beginning? You’ll know the article is on a topic done by yours truly at the request of one of you guys and gals. I wrote a couple already. I will mention the requestor’s name in a dedication to him or her, usually just under the title, to honor the individual.

    My personal intent is to serve your needs by giving you my best; indirectly (and by my choice, wholeheartedly), I work for you…for us. I’ll try to schedule and do as many requests as possible, so bear with me even if one topic doesn’t appear for a while. I read your comments, and all of them are important to me: good, bad, or indifferent. So let’s get started, shall we?

    Earth Angel’s request was an article entailing options for those who wish to remain in the U.S., want to escape the cities, and where to relocate (a place where there is a modicum of freedom remaining). E.A., this one’s for you! It’s a tall order, both to detail and to fill, especially that last part as our freedom is eroding on a daily basis. I’m going to explain the reasons my family and I relocated to Montana and list some basics that we used in consideration as such. I’ll be “laser specific” in terms of steps taken and decisions to arrive at such a goal. Let’s do it.

    Midway through my military career, I visited a friend of mine, a retired Command Sergeant Major who had been a mentor to me (almost as a father) throughout my time in the service. When I had some down time, I drove across country from Ft. Bragg to Libby, Montana to stay with him for three weeks. It was then that I came to appreciate the remoteness of the state and the topographical features that made it such a rugged area off the beaten path. For the next ten years (yeah, I’m that kind of weirdo that plans things that far out), I conducted an “area study,” if you will, of the state and the surrounding vicinity.

    Many factors went into arriving at my final decision. The goal was to find where to move our family so when the Fifth Mongolian Horde attacked or chaos (economic or other) ensued, we would have a good chance. There were things I had to consider that were outside of my wife’s ability to give input regarding our location: the multiple missile silos in north-central Montana, the over flight patterns from Air Force bases (such as Malmstrom AFB), the proximity to the Canadian border, and threat-levels (domestic: totalitarian government, or civilian marauders; foreign: potential for attack by other countries and how it would affect our locale).

    Please allow me to state for the record that for myself, becoming an expatriate is not an option. I am an American, the United States is my country and my home, you are my countrymen, and I would rather die beside you, fighting for my home in America than sip margheritas in Belize.

    That being said, practical matters still remain at the forefront of everything in addition to the tactical considerations. Let’s list some of these out, along with questions you will need to ask yourself and discuss with your family regarding relocation per these matters.


    1.Sustainability: until there is a collapse, you have to put food on the table and have income coming in. Until “Yap” currency comes back into fashion, unfortunately the dollar is still used as the medium of exchange.

    2.What is your present budget and can you set aside funds for moving expenses?

    3.When you arrive, is there income potential for you in your new place? Are you self-employed? Can you relocate with your present firm? Do both you and your spouse work?

    4.Are you going to rent or buy? What are your financial goals to pay property taxes (if applicable) and either buy your property or take a mortgage?

    5.Demographics: this one is a big one that is critical to understand for long-term survivability in dealing with people.

    6.What is the population of the state? Where are the population centers concentrated? What will be the direction of travel for most people when the SHTF, and they become “nomadic foragers?” What are the populations of the cities? How far is your property from the nearest city of more than 3,000-5,000 people?

    7.How many “friendly neighbors” live near your new property on Sesame Street? Who are these people? Are they like-minded or do they pose a danger? Are Homey-the-clown and his gang of thugs in the area? Is the state a liberal state or conservative? Your neighborhood?

    8.Survival Factors: for your basics of food, water, and shelter

    9.What is the growing season of the area you are considering?

    10.Soil test: you should test the soil of your property for pH and to learn how viable it is to grow crops there

    11.Water: well and surface sources. Rain catchment and laws pertaining to it locally. How are the summers? Can you test your well before you purchase?

    12.Do you have a place to run to immediately with food/water/shelter potential (when foraging, if your home becomes a burned-out ruin)?

    13.Are wild game and fish abundant in your area?

    14.What types of agriculture are predominant in the area?

    15.What are your seasons and the weather considerations? Does the temperature hit 30 degrees below zero, or is it warm all year round? Hurricane seasons? Earthquakes?

    16.Tactical Considerations: these have to do with the government becoming completely totalitarian, and also the potential for foreign attack or invasion

    17.Nuke threat: What cities in your state will probably be nuked if a nuclear war occurs? What are the wind drift patterns? Do terrain features or weather anomalies that occur in your geographical vicinity break up the winds?

    18.What are the locations of Active Duty, Reserve, and National Guard military bases and forces in your vicinity?

    19.Can you feasibly escape somewhere if your whole area is “clamped down” upon? Neighboring states? National forests? Vast open areas?

    20.Weapons: what is allowed, what is not, is there open or concealed carry, and limitations on ownership.

    21.Overall tactical considerations for your area: Is there industry that a foreign invader might want to seize? To nuke? Does your area hold any particular strategic importance, either for our government or a foreign power?

    22.If an EMP or a Nuke attack occurs, where are the local nuke reactors in your state? How far is your property from them?

    23.***How defensible is your property, and how easily can you escape from it if it becomes indefensible?

    24.Personal Family Details: These entail the specifics about your family. Do you have a family member with exceptional medical needs? Do you have young children? Are you taking care of a parent? THE MOST CRITICAL ISSUE OF ALL: YOU MUST TAKE A REAL ACCOUNT FOR THE MOST VULNERABLE FAMILY MEMBERS’ NEEDS IN A BIG MOVE.



    There are many more variables to consider than have been listed here. Lots of people would like to know a definite state and the reasons why. I chose Montana because it has a perpetually good hydrological cycle, the area I’m in is safe in a nuclear war, there are plenty of personal freedoms (open carry state with Castle doctrine), and not a high population or high density. There are places where we can run to if need be. The bottom line: I took a lot of time to plan the move and it suits the needs of our family as best as can be for now.

    The bad thing about Montana is (if you’ve read a few articles I wrote on the water compact problems we’ve been having here) an influx of flaming liberals has been steadily arriving here for years. They leave their oppressive states to escape taxes (the same ones they voted for there), then they “emigrate” and continue their mindset and voting stance…and with time the state becomes undermined. A whole bunch of liberals not born in Montana have managed to ensconce themselves in the Montana state senate and House of Representatives and carry on their progressive assault under the “color of law,” so to speak.

    So, to answer your question E.A., the whole country is losing those last fragments of freedom. The big consideration for you and your families cannot just be what state holds onto freedoms, as we’re too “long in the tooth” for them to viably stay sovereign and free. The consideration needs to be twofold:


    1.Can I sustain myself and my family before a collapse/SHTF scenario?

    2.Can we sustain ourselves here after things go down the drain?



    Before and after: these words mean “pre” and “post-societal” collapse, respectively. It will take some serious planning and all of the resources you can muster: local sources in the community/area you intend to move to, comprehensive studies in the library and the bookstores, internet databases, friends and family (never discount the experiences from a credible source via word of mouth), and your own feet on the ground (visiting the area personally). There are plenty of sites that offer such resources. Sift them for nuggets of gold and take some of the advice you find to be worthwhile.

    I welcome open discussion on this; ladies and gentlemen, please take it from here! Everybody have a great day and remember: the best plan of all is a well-executed plan!

    JJ


    Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson is also a Gunsmith, a Certified Master Herbalist, a Montana Master Food Preserver, and a graduate of the U.S. Army’s SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape). He lives in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with his wife and three cats. You can follow Jeremiah’s regular writings at SHTFplan.com.
    This article may be republished or excerpted with proper attribution to the author and a link to www.SHTFplan.com.


    [HR][/HR]

    Related Reading:

    A Green Beret’s Guides To Survival and Preparedness (Full List)
    Strategic Relocation: Strategies and Tips
    A Green Beret’s Guide To Low-Budget Home-Defense Techniques 101: “Early-Warning Systems and Fortifications”
    A Green Beret’s Guide To Low-Budget-Home-Defense Techniques 102: “Defensive Positions”
    More…



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    The Most Likely Disaster Scenarios



    https://youtu.be/o3H3Bo1k8l4

    Published on May 25, 2015
    Some ideas regarding the likelihood of certain disasters, the actuarial science of disaster preparedness if you will. Personal, Local and Global disaster scenarios are discussed.
     
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