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Fleet & Trucking

Discussion in 'Auto, Tractor, Motorcycles, Racing, and Mechanics' started by searcher, Aug 10, 2017.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Buying fleet vehicles part 1: Do you know the TCO?

    Jun 9, 2017
    by Joe Thompson
    President, ROUSH CleanTech


    When a Granny Smith apple costs $1.79 a pound and a Macintosh just 99 cents, it’s easy to compare one apple to another. But when it’s time to decide on a fuel for your new fleet vehicles, the choice is not so simple.

    With different fuels burning at different heat energies, comparing miles-per-gallon ratings of fuels such as gasoline, diesel, propane autogas and natural gas isn’t conclusive. To achieve a true side-by-side comparison, you must look at the total cost of ownership (TCO) between various vehicles and their specific fuel.

    Here are some factors that come into play for TCO:
    • Initial vehicle price
    • Alternative fuel system conversion costs (if applicable)
    • Fueling infrastructure
    • Vehicle maintenance
    • Fuel costs
    • Fuel efficiency
    • Number of annual miles driven
    • Vehicle cost per mile
    • Vehicle warranty
    Figuring the initial vehicle price is fairly straightforward. Your dealer will provide those costs depending on what type and how many of the vehicles you plan to add to your fleet. Many alternative fuel vehicles can be ordered directly through an OEM dealership. For instance, propane autogas trucks with ROUSH CleanTech fuel systems can be ordered directly through a Ford dealership and come with the full Ford factory warranty. And you might be surprised to learn that purchasing a new vehicle equipped with a propane autogas fuel system, rather than gasoline or diesel, may not add much to the initial cost of that vehicle.

    You can also purchase new vehicles and have them retrofitted to take advantage of the benefits of an alternative fuel. Just be sure to add the cost of that retrofitting to your total cost of ownership estimate — and be aware that changes made during retrofitting may void the vehicle’s warranty.

    Although fuel costs vary, your past usage records or average cost information provided by a fuel supplier can help you pin down the fuel portion of TCO. We’ll take a closer look at fuel and infrastructure costs in our next post in this series. Our final post in this three- part series explains how online calculators can help when determining TCO so you can make the best possible decisions for your fleet. Be sure to check them out, and join the conversation here.

    http://fleetowner.com/fleet-management/buying-fleet-vehicles-part-1-do-you-know-tco
     
  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Buying fleet vehicles part 2: The “Aha!” Moment

    Jul 5, 2017
    [​IMG]
    by Joe Thompson
    President, ROUSH CleanTech


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    When something that seems complex suddenly becomes simple, you might experience an “Aha!” moment. Making decisions regarding which fleet vehicles to buy can involve layers of complexity. Understanding the total cost of ownership (TCO) of vehicles can help you cut through those layers with ease and confidence.

    The cost of fueling infrastructure is one part of determining TCO for a fleet vehicle. Environmental and emissions costs, if they are a fleet requirement, must be accounted for as well.

    While building a fueling infrastructure might sound prohibitively expensive, ROUSH CleanTech’s propane autogas fleet customers learn that the actual cost of an on-site propane filling station is reasonable and the construction is simple. The fuel supplier you choose can provide the equipment — in many cases you just need to prepare the site, which the Propane Education & Research Council costs about $1,500 to $7,500, depending on your fleet size. PERC estimates an organization with a small fleet can purchase its own fueling infrastructure (including the pump, tank and dispenser) for between $25,000 and $50,000. Larger fleets requiring stations with higher-capacity tanks, a canopy and multiple dispensers could invest $50,000 to $200,000.

    The fleet infrastructure costs for propane autogas come in much lower than those for other alternative fuels, like electricity or compressed natural gas (CNG). The Natural Gas Vehicles for America estimates that CNG fueling stations can cost between $675,000 and $1,000,000 to build.

    Meeting environmental and emissions regulations can be a critical factor in your vehicle fuel choice. As a domestically produced, clean-burning fuel, propane autogas can help make your fleet “greener” without the expensive emissions technology required with diesel vehicles.

    If using an alternative fuel seems inconvenient or outside standard procedures, it’s tempting to discount making a switch. Let the numbers guide you and inform yourself about the costs and benefits. In our next post in this three-part series, we explain how online calculators make running the numbers easy so you can decide the best fuel for your fleet. Join the conversation here.

    http://fleetowner.com/fleet-management/buying-fleet-vehicles-part-2-aha-moment
     
  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Buying fleet vehicles part 3: Using clear vision

    Aug 8, 2017
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    by Joe Thompson
    President, ROUSH CleanTech


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    “Blind as a bat” makes sense, because bats have to use a kind of radar system to get around, right?

    Yes and no. Some bats do use echolocation, but they aren’t blind: All bat species have eyes and can see. Our knowledge of history and science is filled with these common misconceptions that are easily proven false.

    When choosing new vehicles and perhaps a new fuel for your fleet, using quantifiable facts and figures will make your decisions clear. In this three-part series, we’ve discussed the importance of total cost of ownership (TCO) in comparing vehicles and fuels. To make sure you’re not flying blind, take advantage of available online calculators to measure TCO.

    You can find many helpful online TCO calculators, including:
    Each of these calculators allows you to input information specific to your situation, like vehicle cost, fuel price per gallon, total lifetime miles, federal incentives and more. The EPA’s Greenhouse Gas Equivalencies Calculator will be helpful if you need to factor environmental and emissions costs into your fleet’s TCO.

    The calculators do the work of generating data that can guide your choices. After running the numbers, many fleet operators discover that propane autogas offers lower TCO than conventional fuels like gasoline and diesel and other alternative fuels. In situations where annual miles driven is high and a vehicle’s fuel efficiency is low, propane autogas will provide an even quicker return on investment for that vehicle.

    Choosing vehicles and fuels isn’t simple. We are always happy to answer any questions you have on alternative fuels or fleet vehicles; just comment below or send me an email. Or join the conversation here.

    http://fleetowner.com/ideaxchange/b...m=email&elq2=065e37ec84404a57a8d80f79e4ed104d
     
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Spot truckload rates, demand stay hot into August
    Aug 9, 2017

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    The surge of freight during the last full week of July continued into the week ending Aug. 5, said DAT Solutions, which operates the DAT network of load boards, as August had a stronger start than any month in more than a year and a half. The number of posted loads was nearly unchanged compared to the previous week while available capacity fell 2.1%.

    National average van, flatbed, and refrigerated rates all increased.

    For van freight, load posts edged up 2% while truck posts fell 3%, bumping the van load-to-truck ratio from 5.2 to 5.5. The national average van rate increased 3 cents to $1.82/mile, higher than the average rates for June and July. The biggest rate jumps were on lanes heading to retail distribution centers in the Northeast in advance of back-to-school shopping season.

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    Buffalo, N.Y., saw the largest average rate gain of any major van market last week, up 11 cents to $1.98/mile. Other key outbound markets: Chicago, $2.15/mile, up 7 cents; Dallas, $1.74/mile, up 2 cents; Los Angeles, $2.12/mile, down 1 cent; and Atlanta, $2.09/mile, down a penny.

    Flatbed load posts declined 7% last week while the number of truck posts rose 2%. At $2.22/mile, the national average flatbed rate was 3 cents higher compared to the previous week. Overall, 18% more flatbed loads moved last week than the week before and rates are holding up well especially in the Midwest. Rock Island, Ill., averaged $2.75/mile (up 25 cents) while Cleveland hit $2.25/mile, up 17 cents.

    Nationally, reefer load posts increased 4% and truck posts fell 2%. The average reefer rate rose 4 cents to $2.12/mile.

    Rates are derived from DAT RateView, which provides real-time reports on prevailing spot market and contract rates, as well as historical rate and capacity trends. All reported rates include fuel surcharges.

    http://fleetowner.com/finance/spot-...m=email&elq2=065e37ec84404a57a8d80f79e4ed104d
     
  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Pump my ride
    Aug 7, 2017

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    by Paul Menig
    CEO, Tech-I-M LLC


    I was just thinking earlier this week why the large oil companies are not paying attention to the disruptive nature of the push for greater fuel economy and cleaner air.

    Cities are banning combustion engines and now countries are laying plans to eliminate their production. Auto companies are under attack for not meeting emissions requirements around the world and, possibly, for colluding in the process. One auto company, Volvo, has announced the intent to electrify all its vehicles in the next decade. Granted, electric and hybrid vehicle production is an extremely small percentage of the total production today.

    Everyone still complains about range anxiety, lack of infrastructure, and the time to recharge. Yet, improvements are being made in range and time to charge. Where is the push for better infrastructure? Wouldn’t the existing infrastructure of fueling stations complete with deli’s, restrooms, and snack centers be a good place to pump coulombs of electrical energy as well as gasoline, diesel, and ethanol?

    Apparently the sleeping giants have begun to stir. Today I read that BP is in talks with the electric carmakers to offer charging docks at their fueling stations. It’s somewhat the classic strategy story of the buggy whip which went away when the horsepower pulling the wagon changed to the combustion engine rather than a horse.

    The large oil companies should see themselves in the energy business, not the oil business. They’ve already adapted to providing natural gas as an offshoot of their oil business. But, that was easy, as it was a wasted by-product of producing oil originally.

    Moving into providing just the pumping service for power is a step. Might they become a FaaS company, Fuel as a Service by pumping any form of energy? Or, will they stick to their core competency of mining and processing raw materials for energy? If the latter, they could buy mines for lithium. They could become battery manufacturers owning the giga-battery factories just as they own the huge petroleum processing plants. Might they go so far as to own a power plant, producing the energy? Maybe. I think they will adapt to fuel our need to move around regardless of the energy source. Whether I’m traveling in a tractor-trailer rig, a medium-duty pickup truck with a bucket, an SUV with the family, a micro-electric car, an electric bicycle, or an electric skate-board, “I need more power, Scotty!” Pump My Ride so I can keep going.

    http://fleetowner.com/ideaxchange/p...m=email&elq2=2852c07fad2b4199b1bc286cf4088471
     
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Ram Truck beefs up 2018 model 3500 HD pickup
    OEM boosts diesel engine torque and adds new in-house designed fifth wheel hitch.

    Aug 11, 2017 Fleet Owner Staff

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    The new 2018 Ram pickups will be arriving in dealerships sometime this August. (Photo: Ram Truck)

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    With the start of 2018 model year production, Ram Truck is boosting the capability of its 3500 HD pickup model; increasing available torque for its optional diesel engine package and adding an optional fifth wheel designed by Ram Engineering that can tow up to 30,000 lbs.

    Working closely Cummins, Ram said the 3500 model for 2018 will feature higher boost limits through a variable geometry turbo and flow rate increases through the fuel delivery system for its optional Cummins 6.7-liter I-6 diesel engine.

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    Those improvements produce an additional 30 lb.-ft. of torque for 930 total lb.-ft. of torque.

    Ram noted that its 30,000-lb. fifth-wheel towing uprating will allow customers to move away from Class 4 and 5 trucks to haul trailers that would have otherwise been limited to 24,000 lbs.



    Ram 3500 Heavy Duty maximum gooseneck and conventional hitch maximum trailer weight ratings for the 2018 model year are 31,210 lbs. and 20,000 lbs., respectively.

    http://fleetowner.com/hd-pickup-van/ram-truck-beefs-2018-model-3500-hd-pickup
     
  7. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Tires: Avoiding failures
    Simple steps can help fleets and their drivers avoid catastrophic truck and trailer tire debacles while on the road.
    Aug 9, 2017 Sean Kilcarr | Fleet Owner Magazine



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    (Photo: Thinkstock)

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    Q&A: Tips for taking care of tires


    Checking and maintaining proper air pressure for truck and trailer tires is probably one of the more irritating and time-consuming maintenance tasks faced by drivers and fleet managers alike. And that’s doubly true for highway tractor drive axles and trailer axles spec’d in traditional “dual-wheel” configurations, as checking and maintaining air pressure on the inner dual tire position is a physically taxing chore in numerous ways.

    All the stretching and straining required for reaching the valve stem on an inner dual tire sometimes convinces drivers to skip this important step—required by pre-inspection protocols—or use dubious methods for attaining the air pressure level within a tire, e.g., “thumping” tires with a baton or other such object.

    Ralph Dimenna, COO of Michelin Americas Truck Tires, a division of global tire maker Michelin, noted that a tire that is 10% underinflated will lose 10% in tread wear and will come out of service quicker. He added that a tire that is 20% below the optimal air pressure is considered a flat tire and warned that tires operated in such underinflated conditions will experience “casing fatigue” that could lead to a catastrophic failure or a zipper rupture.

    “If the tire has been run 20% underinflated, it should be removed from the vehicle and scrapped,” Dimenna stressed.

    Under guidelines established by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration under its Compliance Safety Accountability program, a tire that is found to be operating with less than 50% of its maximum pressure is considered to be in an out-of-service condition, putting a truck or tractor-trailer on the side of the road until it can be replaced.

    The reason commercial vehicles are sidelined in such situations is that underinflated tires experience higher temperatures and greater stress, thus presenting an increased risk of failure, explained Jon Intagliata, product manager for tire pressure monitoring systems at Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems.

    “Industry research has indicated that about 90% of tire blowouts can be traced to under-inflation, and almost half of all emergency service road calls are tire-related,” he added.

    Intagliata noted that research by the Technology & Maintenance Council, which is an arm of the American Trucking Associations trade group, found that tire under-inflation of just 20% results in a 30% reduction in tire life.

    “Another pressure-related issue is that of dual-tire imbalance,” he added. “When you’ve got a pair of tires side-by-side on an axle, if one is running at a lower pressure, it’s essentially got a different circumference than its neighbor. This means that as the axle rotates, that tire’s going to drag and experience excessive wear, increasing the chance that it’s going to fail prematurely.”

    There’s also another safety aspect of under-inflation to consider as well beyond just a heightened risk of tire blowouts, he emphasized.

    “Advanced safety technologies really do rely on maintenance of basic components like tires to ensure best performance on the road,” Intagliata said.

    “If you’ve invested in systems that help prevent or mitigate forward collisions or that intervene through braking power to help prevent rollovers, the last thing you want is to reduce their effectiveness through something as easily preventable as poorly inflated tires,” he pointed out.

    Brian Buckham, general manager-product marketing for Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., stressed that while it’s difficult to predict what will happen to a tire when it’s rolling down the highway, preventive maintenance is the one thing that helps ensure tires are in optimal condition before they hit the asphalt.

    “Like other truck components, tires require post-installation maintenance—and good truck tire maintenance starts with frequent air pressure checks,” he emphasized.

    “Generally speaking, maintaining proper tire inflation pressure is probably the single most effective maintenance practice that a fleet can employ to positively impact tire wear, casing life and overall tire performance,” Buckham noted. “As such, both over- and under-inflation should be avoided. Under-inflation can be particularly harmful, as running a truck tire under-inflated for a long period can induce excessive heat buildup.”

    In fact, a study conducted by the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute eight years ago—an effort sponsored by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration—discerned that improper tire maintenance and operational issues were the root cause of 32% of failed truck tires found on the roadside.

    The same study found the two other leading causes of tire debris on the road are road hazards and excessive heat, noted Jason Evans, director of store operations for GCR Tires & Service.

    Heat

    “Heat is a tire’s worst enemy,” he stressed. “Chemical reactions increase exponentially with temperature. As such, heat accelerates the tire-aging process, which is why it is so important to minimize the amount of heat a tire sees both in service and in storage.”

    Michelin’s Dimenna added that when an under-inflated tire heats up, the casing integrity changes due to that heat buildup.

    “This can lead to separation [between the casing and tread] and chemical breakdown,” he explained. “Heat magnifies the issue and tires fail because they cannot be cooled by the ambient temperatures around them.”

    Yet GCR’s Evans also emphasized that cold temperatures can damage a tire, too.

    [​IMG]
    A blown tire casing is one of several end results of improper tire care.


    “Depending on a tire’s compounding and how low the ambient temperature reaches, you can get what is commonly referred to as ‘cold weather cracking,’” he noted. “When a tire is exposed to extreme cold temperatures, tire compounds can lose their elasticity and become brittle. Tires also wear faster when the temperature is lower as compounds become stiff and less pliable.”


    Temperature is critical in more ways than one to ensuring long, usable life for truck and trailer tires, pointed out Tom Clauer, corporate manager of commercial and OTR product planning for the U.S. division of Yokohama Tire.

    “Every [tire] manufacturer will tell you to check the air pressure on a cold tire; not a hot or ‘recently ran’ tire,” he said. “As a tire moves, there is a certain amount of resistance that is evident. This resistance comes from flexing and the various components [of a tire; its tread, casing, and sidewall] moving against and with each other.

    “This generates heat, which will increase the air pressure inside the chamber of the tire.”

    Clauer noted that a commercial tire can handle a certain amount of increased air pressure, but that the key is to not allow the air pressure to drop below its rated capacity for the load.

    “We need to remember that a tire is not carrying the load; it is only a vessel to contain the air pressure, which does carry the load,” he explained.

    Cold

    And as is often the case in trucking, it’s the “little things” that can make a big difference when it comes to maintaining proper tire pressure. Take, for example, tire valve stem caps.

    “All valves should be capped only with either metal or flow-through caps—no plastics,” Clauer said. “The only exceptions would be if you are using automatic air or equalizing systems.”

    Drivers and fleet managers need to remember to always allow a tire to cool for several hours or overnight in order to get an accurate air pressure measurement, he emphasized.

    “Extremely cold climates can create just the opposite results and bring in other issues,” he added. “In extreme cold climates, air pressure should be checked in a controlled environment. If possible, allow the tire(s) to reach a temperature above 32 degrees [Fahrenheit] in order to get an accurate pressure measurement.”

    [​IMG]
    Freddy Navarro of Rancho Foods checks tire tread depth, a crucial step to ensuring longer and safer tire life. (Photo: Yokohama Tire)


    Other challenges that can affect tire performance in extreme cold environments include condensation in both ambient air and in the compressed air found within a commercial vehicle’s air supply system.


    “This can gather in the [tire air] valve core, freeze, expand and actually allow the core to open and release air,” Clauer explained, leading to tire deflation.

    Goodyear’s Buckham added that fleets should make it standard practice to check inflation levels at least once a week, if not more often when possible.

    “Also keep in mind that ambient temperature can impact a tire’s inflation levels,” he said. “As a general rule of thumb, inflation pressure can drop one pound [per square inch] for every 10-degree [Fahrenheit] decrease in ambient temperature.”

    Some fleets also employ the extra step of using an automatic tire inflation system to monitor and “top off” tire pressure levels as needed, added Buckham.

    “In addition to tire pressure checks, we strongly recommend that fleets perform regular visual and tactile inspections of their tires,” he emphasized. “Things to check for include unusual wear patterns, plus cracks, cuts, bulges and blisters, all of which should be addressed immediately.”

    GCR’s Evans noted that while such “visual cues” regarding tire condition are important, proper tire maintenance and safety are about more than meets the naked eye.

    “We advise our customers to conduct thorough tire assessments before each haul, which includes checking inflation pressure at each wheel position, measuring inflation pressure, and tracking mileage on tires,” he explained.

    Additionally, Evans said fleets should regularly mount/dismount wheels and check truck alignment to help catch any non-visible issues before they become unplanned downtime.

    “It’s also critical for fleets to work with their dealer/service partner to schedule regular tire inspection checks that are conducted by a tire professional,” he pointed out.

    Alignment

    Other critical tactics can be used to not only ensure better overall tire health but reduce the risk of premature failure as well.

    “Tire alignment is important,” Michelin’s Dimenna said. “Many tire problems can be traced to mechanical conditions in the vehicle. Therefore, to obtain maximized tire performance, vehicles must be properly maintained—and that includes tire alignment.”

    He noted that “alignment” refers not only to the various angles of the steer axle geometry, but also to the tracking of all axles on a vehicle including the trailer.

    “The dual purpose of proper alignment is to minimize tire wear and to maximize predictable vehicle handling and driver control,” he explained. “Toe misalignment is the number one cause of steer tire irregular wear, followed by rear axle skew, also known as parallelism or thrust.”

    Dimenna also pointed out that proper tire matching and rotation are important too. “Beware mixing [types of] tires on your vehicle, especially across an axle,” he warned. “Try to match tires with the same tread depths, same tread patterns, and same height or diameter.”

    At the end of the day, however, putting an emphasis on maintaining proper tire inflation pressure is perhaps the single more effective tactic to not only reduce the risk of catastrophic blowouts but also as a way to ensure all other safety systems on a truck and trailer work to their utmost capability, too, according to Bendix’s Intagliata.

    “If you think of the approach to safety system maintenance like a hierarchy, tire upkeep—much like the actual tires on a vehicle—is the foundation upon which other systems rest,” he said.

    “Getting the best performance from drum brakes, air disc brakes, full-stability systems, and advanced driver assistance technologies requires tires that are in good shape and at the correct inflation pressure,” Intagliata emphasized.

    “Tire inflation is just about the most basic form of maintenance there is, but not paying the right attention to it can have serious effects on several levels of vehicle and fleet safety,” he stressed.

    TIRE CARE: FROM START TO FINISH

    Reducing the risk of premature failure or a catastrophic failure for either a truck or trailer tire isn’t solely about maintaining proper inflation pressure, noted Jason Evans, director of store operations for GCR Tires & Service. In fact, the process starts before a fleet even buys its tires.

    —Select the right tire for the job, considering the proper tire size, load-carrying capacity, speed capability, and service type.

    —Inspect tires frequently for damage such as cuts, cracks, bulges, and penetrations.

    —Track mileage and measure inflation pressure to monitor tire performance. (Note: tire under-inflation by as little as 10% can result in a 1.5% drop in fuel economy, according to data analyzed by TMC.)

    —Check tread depth at each wheel position and watch for mismatching tread depths to avoid scrub. Scrub-out is caused when one tire has a larger circumference or tread depth. This leads to irregular wear and can impact fuel economy.

    —Set and maintain proper cold inflation pressures. Cold inflation pressure is the inflation pressure of tires before they are driven.

    —Abide by the tire’s maximum recommended speed, which may be lower than posted speed limits.

    Tom Clauer, corporate manager of commercial and OTR product planning for Yokohama Tire, adds in a few other “telltale warning signs” that may indicate a tire could be close to suffering a premature failure. Those include sidewall discoloration, cuts, scrapes, and other damage; irregular wear; and debris in the tread.

    “When it comes to tread condition, ‘shiny’ is not good, as that may indicate nail heads or bolts are stuck in it,” he explained. “Look for and dislodge any debris stuck in the [tread] grooves such as rocks that the tires cannot eject. If they are not removed, they could continue to work at the tread base and groove walls and pose potential casing damage if allowed to get through the base and into the steel belts.”

    http://fleetowner.com/tires/tires-a...m=email&elq2=2852c07fad2b4199b1bc286cf4088471
     
  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Driver pay, trucking’s image, and the worsening driver shortage
    Aug 14, 2017 Cristina Commendatore

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    Photo: Thinkstock

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    Pay up!


    The average age of the truck driver is 52 and each year that number continues to increase, according to Leah Shaver, COO at the National Transportation Institute. But as fleets are finding it more and more difficult to attract a younger driver base, partly because of an industry-wide image problem, what can they do to soften the blow of a deepening driver shortage?

    “Our efforts to recruit and retain millennials today are not as successful as we need them to be. The incoming students are not coming in at fast enough rates, and they’re not sticking with the industry the way that we need,” Shaver explained during a recent Fleet Owner webinar sponsored by Ryder.

    Titled Listening to the Voice of the Driver can Ease the Shortage, Shaver along with Patrick Pendergast, group director of talent acquisition at Ryder System, discussed how driver income, trucking’s image, and the economy are impacting the worsening truck driver shortage.

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    NTI, which tracks driver income for both for-hire and private fleets, has found private fleet income is always more stable than for-hire income. According to Shaver, one of the problems is that over the last 10 years, for-hire income has at times been the opposite of the rate of inflation. In the last five years, she explained the rate of change for driver compensation has gone up by only 6.3%. Compare that to minimum wage, which has gone up by 45.26%, and the income for a worker at McDonald’s, which has increased by 94%.

    NTI also compared earnings for for-hire fleets versus private fleets per region nationwide and found that the median W2 income nationwide is about $54,000 for for-hire fleets and well over $70,000 for private fleet drivers.

    “That’s a big gap,” Shaver stressed, noting that private fleet drivers also have more consistent workloads and time spent at home. “Private fleet drivers tend to retire from their jobs. They don’t age out or wear out in the same way that they do in for-hire fleets. It’s a lifelong career, and they do retire. Private fleets are seeing retirements in record numbers, and they’re really expanding their recruiting and retention efforts.”

    Shaver noted that throughout the industry, however, there really haven’t been significant changes in driver compensation this year, which is difficult to understand considering the decrease in the supply of drivers. There has been a small increase—0.6% in the maximum a driver can earn at a company—but overall the industry has seen very little movement in earnings, she added.

    Plus, the industry is still trying to overcome an image problem. “In recent news we see that media can pick up on a story, and image can still affect our industry,” Shaver said. “Ultimately, that image makes it very hard to sell as a career.”

    Shaver referred to articles from the New York Times and USA Today in which drivers interviewed said they really feel a continued disconnect with their companies and often feel like they’re “throwaway people.”

    “When we visit with carriers, we’re seeing some upward movement in driver turnover,” Shaver explained. “Carriers are telling us pretty consistently that turnover has spiked up, and driver supply is becoming even more difficult.”

    Driver satisfaction: Best practices
    According to Pendergast, pay is a crucial component to how satisfied a driver is, but it’s not the only one. He outlined some best practices for fleets to consider.

    Appreciation: “How do we figure out within our own group of employees, our own group of drivers, what really matters to them,” Pendergast asked. “We encourage companies to spend time talking to their drivers. Some drivers feel disconnected and don’t feel their company recognizes them as a true partner.”

    Using advanced technology to attract talent: “Millennials have grown up with a tremendous amount of technology all around them,” he noted. “As Leah pointed out, the trucking industry does have an image problem. It’s incumbent on us in the industry to talk about the changes in engine technology and talk about collision avoidance and all the things that are attractive to the younger generation.”

    Have a plan around retention: “This problem isn’t going away,” Pendergast stressed. “The ostrich approach isn’t going to work.” He added it is critically important for fleets to listen to their drivers to understand what challenges they face. “Some managers might be nervous to hear the challenges the drivers have, but that’s the first step to understanding what your turnover looks like.”

    Pay and benefits: Pendergast advised carriers be in line with what the market is paying and the environment in which they’re operating.

    Treatment: “Do your managers understand the roles they play in your turnover percentage,” he asked. “They are certainly playing a big role in how the driver feels when they get in their truck and go out for their loads that day.”

    Employee involvement and training: Pendergast advised that fleets get employees involved in the decisions that affect them and acknowledge any input they give. When it comes to training and advancement, he said all employees, but particularly millennials, have a real thirst for learning and understanding how they get ahead and what the next steps are.

    Recognition and performance management: Perks such as performance bonuses for safety, driver of the month, safety banquets, and other events that highlight what drivers are doing really well and what matter for your company go a long way, Pendergast stressed. He also noted that open communication and regularly scheduled performance appraisals are invaluable in driver retention efforts.

    According to Shaver, researchers at NTI know and believe that the driver turnover will continue to rise. “It’s going to be stuck at over 80% in the foreseeable balance of the year—that’s our prediction,” she said. “We think that GDP (gross domestic product) is going to continue to grow. Unemployment has dropped. Blue collar jobs are not being filled. Construction is booming. Labor shortage is an issue. All of these signs point to economic growth, but our prediction remains nearly flat for driver pay.”

    http://fleetowner.com/driver-manage...m=email&elq2=412151b12bac4ddabaa832d7fc8ff455
     
  9. nickndfl

    nickndfl Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter ++

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    Rear wheel drive fleet. brucemedical_2272_6254744.jpg
     
    searcher likes this.
  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Trucking worries CARB may step into GHG gap
    Move by EPA to “revisit” Phase 2 rules may encourage more California-only regulation, trade groups fear.
    Aug 21, 2017 Fleet Owner Staff

    [​IMG]
    "By reopening the rule to re-examine trailers and glider kits, EPA has opened the door to California taking the lead, and a more aggressive track, in setting trailer standard." —Chris Spear, ATA's president and CEO. (Photo: Sean Kilcarr/Fleet Owner)

    Related Media
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    EPA plans to revisit Phase 2 GHG rules


    The American Trucking Associations (ATA) and the Truck Renting and Leasing Association (TRALA) are two industry trade groups worried that the intent announced by the Environmental Protection Agency last week to “re-evaluate” parts the Phase 2 greenhouse gas (GHG) and fuel efficiency rules could be setting the stage for California to impose “de facto” national standards on the country.

    “By reopening the rule to re-examine trailers and glider kits, EPA has opened the door to California taking the lead, and a more aggressive track, in setting trailer standards,” cautioned Chris Spear, ATA’s president and CEO, in a statement.

    “ATA believes a single national standard, set by federal regulators, is preferable to at worst, a patchwork of state standards or at best, a de facto national standard that is set without the appropriate opportunity for the entire regulated community – many members of which are not based in California – to weigh in,” he said.

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    TRALA President and CEO Jake Jacoby is also concerned this may give the California Air Resources Board (CARB) an “opportunity” to enact a more stringent standard than what was finalized under the Phase 2 GHG rules last year.

    "For a national industry to function efficiently, it is imperative that a national standard decided by the federal government is followed, and not a patchwork of states creating their own greenhouse gas standards,” he explained in a statement.

    While Jacoby added that TRALA understands the concerns of many trailer manufacturers and their opposition to trailers being included in this rule as currently written, he emphasized that TRALA will continue to work with EPA and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) – which both had a hand in writing the Phase 2 rules – in an attempt to ensure a national standard is adopted.

    http://fleetowner.com/emissions/tru...m=email&elq2=7102b010e5274aefb970ddd2cf96ae73
     
  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    How to attract more technicians
    Aug 21, 2017

    [​IMG]
    by Jane Clark
    VP, Member Services, NationaLease



    The people shortage in the trucking industry is no surprise to anyone. In part, it is the result of a national shortage of skilled labor and the lack of programs to attract job seekers to our industry as drivers and technicians.

    The lack of skilled technicians is resulting in increased downtime and inefficiencies. It also leads to dissatisfaction among your current staff as they are tasked with doing more work.

    There are several ways to deal with the problem and Paul Nowicki, director of sales and operations, and Arthur Lon, senior account manager, at TransTech, shared their thoughts on the subject of hiring and retaining technicians at a recent NationaLease meeting.
    • Invest in an internal recruiting team
    • Offer better wages and benefits to cut down on turnover
    • Partner with someone who has a training and development program, or create your own
    • Work with an external staffing company
    Regardless of which option you choose, there are things you can do to improve your hiring process. Reduce the amount of time it takes you to respond to candidates. In your recruiting efforts focus on what jobseekers are looking for. According to Nowicki and Lon, that includes a career path and set performance based wage increases and a competitive benefits package. Also make the needed investments in technology that allow you to streamline the application process.

    Another tip is to make sure you have a social media presence on Facebook, LinkedIn, Glassdoor, Twitter and Instagram. And make sure you update your social sites regularly.

    Spend some time writing a job description that actually will attract people. In evaluating the job description ask yourself if you would apply for the job after reading the description. If the answer is no, rewrite it.

    Employees today are placing a great deal of emphasis on training and development. Make sure you share development plans and training opportunities with potential employees. With a plan in hand, not only will you attract more qualified candidates, but you will also retain more of the ones you do hire.

    http://fleetowner.com/ideaxchange/h...m=email&elq2=7102b010e5274aefb970ddd2cf96ae73
     
  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    CVSA releases Roadcheck 2017 results
    CVSA found the top three reasons vehicles were placed out-of-service were brake, cargo securement, and tire/wheel violations.
    Aug 23, 2017 Fleet Owner Staff

    [​IMG]
    Commercial motor vehicle enforcement personnel conducted a total of 62,013 driver and vehicle safety inspections on large trucks and buses during the Roadcheck inspection blitz held June 6-8, 2017.


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    Violations for brake systems, cargo securement, and tires/wheels were the top causes vehicles were placed out of service during the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) 2017 Roadcheck inspection blitz.

    Commercial motor vehicle enforcement personnel in Canada and the United States conducted a total of 62,013 Level I, II and III driver and vehicle safety inspections on large trucks and buses during the blitz held June 6-8, 2017. According to CVSA, 23% of vehicles and 4.2% of drivers that received Level I inspections were placed out of service.

    A Level I inspection is a 37-step procedure that includes examination of both the driver and vehicle. Other inspections conducted included the NAS Level II walk-around inspection (12,787) and the NAS Level III driver-only inspection (8,282).

    International Roadcheck is a three-day enforcement event when CVSA-certified inspectors conduct high-volume roadside inspections of large trucks and buses. Commercial motor vehicles and their drivers were checked at inspection sites, weigh stations and roving patrol locations along roadways in North America throughout the 72-hour enforcement initiative.

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    CVSA noted that 19.4% of commercial motor vehicles inspected were placed out of service, and that 4.7% of all drivers inspected were placed out of service.

    Of the 40,944 Level I inspections conducted, 23% (9,398) were placed out of service for vehicle-related violations. The top three out-of-service vehicle violations were for:
    • Brake systems (26.9 % of vehicle out-of-service violations)
    • Cargo securement (15.7%)
    • Tires/wheels (15.1%)
    Of the 2,267 vehicles carrying hazardous materials/dangerous goods that received a Level I inspection, 12.8% were placed out of service for vehicle-related violations. The top three vehicle violations related to the transportation of hazardous materials/dangerous goods were for:
    • Loading and securement (40.4% of all out-of-service hazardous materials/dangerous goods violations)
    • Shipping papers (22.7%)
    • Placarding (20.8%)
    Of the vehicles placed out of service, brake adjustment and brake system violations combined to represent 41.4% (7,743) of all out-of-service vehicle violations.

    According to CVSA, driver results are as follows:
    • 4.7% (2,940) of drivers were placed out of service for driver-related violations.
    • Of the inspections of vehicles carrying hazardous materials/dangerous goods, 1.9% were placed out of service for driver-related violations.
    • Out of the 598 motorcoaches inspected, 3.8% (23) of drivers were placed out of service for driver-related violations.
    • The top three driver-related violations were for hours of service (32.3% of driver out-of-service violations), wrong class license (14.9%) and false log book (11.3%).
    • There were 710 safety belt violations.
    Each year, Roadcheck places special emphasis on a category of violations. This year’s focus was cargo securement. Cargo securement violations (not including hazardous materials/dangerous goods loading/securement) represented 15.7% of all vehicle out-of-service violations during the inspection blitz.

    According to CVSA’s data, the top five violations related to cargo securement (out of a total of 3,282) in the United States were:

    1. No or improper load securement (423)
    2. Failure to secure vehicle equipment (379)
    3. Leaking, spilling, blowing, falling cargo (281)
    4. Insufficient tiedowns to prevent forward movement for load not blocked by headerboard, bulkhead or cargo (256)
    5. Failure to secure load (178)
    “This year, we’re celebrating 30 years of the International Roadcheck Program,” said CVSA president Julius Debuschewitz with Yukon Highways and Public Works. “When this program started in 1988, the goal of International Roadcheck was to conduct inspections to identify and remove unsafe commercial motor vehicles and/or drivers from our roadways. Thirty years and 1.5 million inspections later, the International Roadcheck enforcement initiative is still going strong, thanks to the more than 13,000 inspectors who work hard every day to reduce the number of crashes, injuries and fatalities on our roadways.”

    http://fleetowner.com/roadside-insp...m=email&elq2=29d6e771ff1b47bbac2ec429f16ccebf
     
  13. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Great at their craft
    Aug 21, 2017

    [​IMG]
    by Michael Roeth
    Executive Director, North American Council for Freight Efficiency


    Last week, we announced the drivers and showcased the equipment that will participate in RunonLess, a first-of-its kind fuel efficiency roadshow sponsored by Shell and PepsiCo, and hosted by NACFE and Carbon War Room. It gave us a chance to share the amazing equipment and talented drivers that will demonstrate what can be done with currently available tractors and trailers to save fuel and emissions.

    On June 20th, we announced the fleets that have joined the roadshow that will take place from September 6th, through the NACV show in Atlanta, ending September 28th. Data from the trucks will be streamed to a dashboard on the website, where you can view daily totals of miles traveled, fuel consumed, dollars and emissions save, amongst other detailed statistics.

    During July, we went out and met the drivers that Albert Transport, PepsiCo's Frito-Lay Division, Hirschbach, Mesilla Valley Transportation, Nussbaum Transportation, Ploger Transportation, and US Xpress, selected to drive some of their most fuel-efficient tractor trailers. This experience was amazing as we met some fascinating people, with a common passion – driving trucks to make money and save fuel and emissions. My conclusion, they are great at their craft. “This is going to be a lot of fun, challenging ourselves to achieve the best fuel efficiency with these incredible tractor trailers,” shared Henry Albert, an owner-operator for his business, Albert Transport. “All seven of us are proud to take trucking efficiency to the next level and share with the world our experiences.”

    We’ve set up a situation here where we can all look into the everyday challenges and thrills of driving these trucks and use less fuel. Their stories are shared in seven videos that can be viewed here. They’re short, two to three minutes, but very impactful. Some are humbler than others, all concentrate on their driving and idling and are incredibly knowledgeable with the technologies on their equipment. During the Run, they will be sharing their stories from the road, helping us gain insights into how they deliver high mpg while concentrating on making money for their companies and themselves.

    It was like watching a great quarterback win a game in the fourth quarter, or attend a concert of a world-renowned pianist, or go to a movie of an academy award winning actor. I think my team and I have met some of the best HD truck drivers over the past few weeks. Watch their videos and get to know them over the course of the next few months on www.runonless.com, I think you’ll be glad you did.

    http://fleetowner.com/ideaxchange/g...m=email&elq2=29d6e771ff1b47bbac2ec429f16ccebf
     
  14. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    From managing iron to managing charts
    Aug 23, 2017

    [​IMG]
    by Darry Stuart
    President, DWS Fleet Management



    Maintenance managers are always trying to be controlled by the bean counters. And in some cases they need to be, for there is no question about the value of measuring cash in versus cash out; of drilling down into the business plan of income and expenses to find savings.

    For the last 35 years, managers of iron have found ways to reduce cost because they had to in order to keep their jobs; they had to be creative and make cuts to stay alive. Many needed to be forced, though, as some old iron men needed to truly understand where their costs where hiding.

    But now maintenance managers face a new trend for trying to control costs that are rising and rising fast.

    Costs are going through the roof for tires, emission systems, labor, and parts, and the maintenance manager no longer can find “magical methods” to reduce or maintain costs as done in the past.

    Sure, we have VMRS (vehicle maintenance reporting standards) to guide us. Oh sure, if properly utilized and you have 100% of your labor and 100% of your parts, you will get the total cost of the vehicle in dollars. Then you have to find the common denominator you want to measure to – be it miles, hours, tons, cases, pounds, months, weeks, gallons, etc.

    But at the highest level, costs are measured by general ledger accounting, established by how finance wants to code expenses for payment, with the higher forces wanting to see it in a much simpler, non-diluted form.

    Yet this new generation of mangers using emails, texts, and Facebook perceives value by measuring charts, graphs, predictions, and benchmarking – all in a way to reduce costs or fix the perceived problem on a short-term, cost-cutting basis.

    But the fact remains that the person sending the charts, in some cases, is now the cousin of the person receiving the charts, and that’s causing new problems.

    A short story: a new manager is hired by a fleet. He is saddled with the maintenance department, yet maintenance is not his forte – his forte is organization from behind the desk, charts on the wall. He’s been hired by the owner, a guy with similar thought processes who is also driven by numbers, who has been unhappy for years with the condition of the fleet, maintenance facility costs, customer disruptions, as well as other missed operational opportunities.

    So the new guy’s style and approach is to measure – make charts and graphs. His boss is happy because now they both can look at the same reports and both conclude that the costs are too high. They are not meeting the budget so they plan to drive cost out without seeing in real life where the money is being spent, such as the upkeep for an aging fleet of trucks with only a sprinkling of new 2017 units within it.

    In summary, we’ve gotten to a point where no one cares or knows about how to fix trucks; what it’s going to take, how are we going to do it, or how much money will it really cost?

    What truly works still, though, are the basic methods; basic simplified methods where good maintenance practices and elbow grease fix the problems, with “micro-measurement” through charts and graphs only required to understand that process – not control it. If you fix the basic issues, then the numbers fall into line.

    Yet there is no more room at the top for such “iron guys” who know how to fix trucks but not necessarily now to measure that process. That is the never-ending challenge; make the repairs fit the numbers, rather than understanding the iron.

    By the way, both groups have their missions: we iron guys need to understand numbers and data people need to understand iron. I would also state that without the push of measuring, bread would be $8 a loaf.

    Thus, while you must measure, you must also understand and work jointly with the iron guys; all towards the common goal of being the low cost maintenance provider. Value and understand the iron guy’s position. He is the one who has to drive the cost out of truck maintenance, not continue to defend him or herself by the minute, in lieu of cost-reduction efforts.

    http://fleetowner.com/ideaxchange/m...m=email&elq2=88012012c0e64a398733e62ae0a7c521
     
  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Could apprenticeship programs bring more youngsters into trucking?
    Aug 25, 2017 by Sean Kilcarr in Trucks at Work


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    This particular thought has been bandied about the trucking industry for some time now: allowing 18 to 21 year olds, under close supervision, to drive commercial trucks.

    Chris Spear, president and CEO of the American Trucking Associations (ATA) acknowledged to me at the recent TMW Systems and PeopleNet 2017 in.sight user conference and exposition that the trade group plans to push for the establishment of an apprentice program that would allow the trucking industry to “capture” 18 year old high school graduates and train them as drivers.

    “We’re losing the 18 to 21 year olds to other industries,” he explained as the reason why ATA plans to make a concerted effort to get the federal government behind its apprenticeship plan.


    “We’re going to need 960,000 people for our industry as drivers over the next decade,” Spear emphasized. “We need to think outside of the box; we do a disservice to our industry if we don’t.”

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    Spear added that when he work in the Department of Labor during the George W. Bush’s presidency, he noted that the agency provided workforce training “grants” to a variety of industries to the tune of $4 billion a year – and Spear believes just retooling some of that money to fund truck driver apprenticeships, especially in the inner cities of the U.S., could uncork a broader flow of candidates into the truck driver employment pool.

    But not so fast, argue others – including John Larkin, managing director and head of transportation capital markets research for Stifel Capital Markets.

    [​IMG]
    John Larkin. (Photo: Aaron Marsh/Fleet Owner)


    In a recent research note, Larkin said “it could take several years” to gain Congressional and regulatory approval for such an apprenticeship program – “if the industry association can get any traction at all,” he added.

    “Most insurance companies refuse to insure companies hiring drivers younger than 22 to 25 years old,” Larkin pointed out. Also “most of the higher quality high school graduates, who are not attending college, have developed other careers prior to becoming age eligible for a professional truck driving position.”

    In addition, he noted that “all the talk of autonomous trucks is scaring away many young people from the industry. Why would a young person want to enter a profession that will soon be disrupted by technology?”

    Yet Larkin also emphasized that widespread adoption of autonomous trucks might be several decades, or more, away – leaving the trucking industry facing yet another challenge, that of “getting that message across to young people” who might consider a career as a professional truck driver if they were not going to eventually be replaced by self-driving machines.

    It’s a ticklish problem, no doubt: one of many bedeviling industry efforts to find, recruit, and retain good safety-conscious truck drivers. And it’s an effort that will need to be sustained for a long time to come.

    http://fleetowner.com/blog/could-ap...m=email&elq2=4d80eceb09154982967b78f989b780fb
     
  16. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    CVSA commits to phased-in ELD enforcement process
    Inspectors will start placing trucks out of service for lack of ELD compliance starting April 1 next year.
    Aug 28, 2017 Fleet Owner Staff

    [​IMG]
    Beginning April 1, 2018, inspectors will start placing commercial motor vehicle drivers out of service if their vehicle is not equipped with the required electronic logging device, CVSA said. (Photo: Sean Kilcarr/Fleet Owner)


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    The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) said it will start “phasing-in” enforcement of the electronic logging device (ELD) mandate requirements on December 18 this year, with plans to begin using the out-of-service criteria (OOSC) associated with the ELD mandate starting April 1 next year.

    The group said in a statement that setting an April 1, 2018, effective date for ELD OOSC enforcement “will provide the motor carrier industry, shippers and the roadside enforcement community with time to adjust to the new requirement before vehicles are placed out of service for ELD violations.”

    CVSA also sent a letter to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) notifying the agency of its commitment to implementing the ELD mandate.


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    “What’s important to remember is that [ELD mandate] violations will count towards a motor carrier’s safety rating starting in December; this is not a ‘soft enforcement’ effort. We can’t even use that term,” Collin Mooney, CVSA’s executive director, explained to Fleet Owner.

    But the reason OOSC enforcement won’t begin until April 1 next year is that it allows the enforcement community “to get a better handle” on how many fleets are in compliance with the rule.

    “We don’t have a handle on how many motor carriers are not in compliance with the [ELD mandate] yet; some say it’s 10% while other say it’s as high as 40%,” Mooney noted. “Even though we inspect only a small fraction of the trucks out there, it still gives us a good sample size as to how many are in compliance with the new rule.”

    David Heller, vice president of government affairs for the Truckload Carriers Association (TCA), detailed some of those criteria in a webinar earlier this year. Trucks can be placed out-of-service for 10 hours if:
    • They are not equipped with an ELD;
    • They are using a non-authorized ELD, which is one that does not meet the FMCSA’s specification and one that does not appear on its certification list;
    • They are unable to produce or transfer data from their ELD to law enforcement officials;
    • They do not repair a malfunctioning ELD within eight days;
    • The driver simply did not log into the device as required.

    CVSA stressed that the congressionally-mandated ELD compliance deadline is still set for December 18 as of this moment and so on that day inspectors and roadside enforcement personnel will begin documenting violations on roadside inspection reports and, at the jurisdiction's discretion, will issue citations to commercial motor vehicle drivers operating vehicles without a compliant ELD.

    Beginning April 1, 2018, however, inspectors will start placing commercial motor vehicle drivers out of service if their vehicle is not equipped with the required device, the group said.

    As a reminder, CVSA stressed that motor carriers may continue to use grandfathered automatic onboard recording devices (AOBRDs) no later than Dec. 16, 2019.

    CVSA’s Mooney added that while his group hasn’t selected a “focus area” for its annual Roadcheck International 72-hour safety enforcement blitz, typically held in June every year, ELDs are “high on the list.”

    “Hours of service enforcement has always been a key component of Roadcheck, and as we’ll be six months in with this new rule, it will be something we look at,” he said.

    http://fleetowner.com/driver-logs/c...m=email&elq2=4d80eceb09154982967b78f989b780fb
     
  17. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    United Kingdom to fund trials of truck platoons
    Testing involving DAF, DHL expected to take place in 2018
    Aug 27, 2017 Fleet Owner Staff

    [​IMG]
    DAF Trucks, which will develop the vehicles for the United Kingdom trials, also participated in last year's EU Truck Platooning Challenge. (Photo: DAF)


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    The United Kingdom announced it will help fund the first real-world operational trials of platooning trucks on its roads by the end of 2018.

    The Transport Research Library will lead the test, which will include DAF Trucks, Ricardo and DHL. The United Kingdom will spend the equivalent of more than $10 million on the trials.

    “Advances such as lorry platooning could benefit businesses through cheaper fuel bills and other road users thanks to lower emissions and less congestion. But first we must make sure the technology is safe and works well on our roads, and that’s why we are investing in these trials,” said U.K. transport minister Paul Maynard.



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    DAF will develop the trucks for the trial, which will form part of regular DHL logistical operations. All trucks in the platoons will have a driver at the wheel.

    Last year, the EU Truck Platooning Challenge saw a variety of truck manufacturers cross multiple countries to showcase the technology.

    http://fleetowner.com/autonomous-ve...m=email&elq2=4d80eceb09154982967b78f989b780fb
     
  18. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    New details of Tesla's planned electric truck revealed
    Aug 27, 2017 by Neil Abt in The Open Road

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    Tesla’s soon-to-be-unveiled electric long-haul truck will have a range of 200 to 300 miles, according to a new report.

    On several occasions in recent months, CEO Elon Musk has referenced the planned late-September unveiling of an electric tractor, though few specifics have been made available.

    Last week, Scott Perry of Ryder System shared details with Reuters of a meeting he had with Tesla. He told Reuters the electric day cab will be aimed at regional hauls, at least in the initial phases. Perry is Ryder’s chief technology officer.

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    During a shareholders' meeting earlier this year, Musk told attendees “a lot of people don’t think you can do a heavy-duty, long-range truck that’s electric, but we are confident that this can be done.”

    Several days before the Reuters story was published, I casually brought up the topic of Tesla with an executive at a truck manufacturer.

    I was unaware he was the owner of a Tesla car, and he was quick to praise his experience with the vehicle during the past two years.

    While skeptical that a true long-haul electric Class 8 tractor was ready for the road next month, he sternly said people would be wise not to underestimate Tesla.

    He also suggested he was keeping his eyes open for an invite to truck unveiling. It is not uncommon for Tesla owners to have the opportunity to attend events.

    He’s far from the only one in the trucking industry interested in what Tesla is cooking up.

    http://fleetowner.com/blog/new-deta...m=email&elq2=fd0317248aa4475dafda4b0c32ef23cb
     
  19. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Cummins unveils fully electric tractor
    Aug 29, 2017 Fleet Owner Staff

    [​IMG]
    Cummins unveiled its fully electric Class 7 tractor that is intended for vocational applications such as urban delivery, port drayage and terminal handling. (Photos: Aaron Marsh / Fleet Owner)


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    COLUMBUS, IN. During an event on Tuesday, Aug. 29, Cummins unveiled its fully electric Class 7 demonstration Urban Hauler Tractor here at the company’s technical center.

    The truck, intended as a "technical demonstrator" for vocational applications like urban delivery, port drayage and terminal handling, has a Cummins integrated electric powertrain and was built by Roush with the design inspired by Cummins. It has a range of 100 miles on a single charge, which is extendable to 300 miles with the addition of a second pack of batteries.

    In addition, the company displayed the latest in near-zero natural gas engine technology, diesel engines (the X12 and X15), and shared plans to introduce a heavy-duty diesel engine in 2022.

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    [​IMG]
    Cummins' Aeos fully electric tractor

    “These new technological innovations build on our 100-year legacy of bringing the best solutions to our customers, driving their success and meeting the evolving demands of their industries and markets,” said Jennifer Rumsey, chief technical officer, Cummins Inc. “We will harness our global technical footprint to continue to develop a wide variety of power technologies to bring our customers the choice and solutions that enable their success and contribute to a sustainable future.”

    During the event, which included tours of the Cummins technical center, Cummins leaders and scientists showcased the company’s work in analysis-led design capability, virtual reality, alternative fuels and digital capabilities.

    “As a global power leader for the commercial and industrial customers we serve, with an unmatched service and support network, we are better positioned than any other company to win in new and emerging technologies and in new markets,” said Rich Freeland, Cummins president and chief operating officer. “We will leverage our deep industry and customer knowledge and our scale advantage to win. Over the past century, our ability to innovate and adapt has fueled our success and we are confident we are on the right path to do it again.”

    http://fleetowner.com/powertrain/cu...m=email&elq2=2d3754c501db45009216848bc6c43567
     
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    Cummins readies next-gen, future commercial power
    Aug 30, 2017 Aaron Marsh

    [​IMG]
    Cummins, Inc.'s upcoming X12 and the next generation of its X15 engines demonstrate its commitment to efficient, cleaner heavy duty diesel engines while the company expands its alternate fuel and electric power options as well. (Photo: Sean Kilcarr/ Fleet Owner)


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    Cummins unveils fully electric tractor


    COLUMBUS, IN. With about 42,000 of Cummins, Inc.'s latest big-bore X15 Series diesel engines produced since their launch in January, the company unveiled the 15L platform's next evolution slated for availability in 2022 and showcased a range of energy-diverse products, including a fully electric, plug-in Class 7 truck.

    The press event at Cummins Technical Center here in Columbus, the company's global headquarters, explored how the engine maker is positioning itself to be the supplier of choice across the spectrum of diesel, alternative and emerging engine and powertrain technologies for commercial vehicles. "We're ready to support the changes shaped by the regulatory environment and global concern for air quality and the need for a low-carbon future," said Jennifer Rumsey, vice president and chief technology officer at Cummins.

    [​IMG]
    Cummins' Jennifer Rumsey said the company is investing in an array of power solutions to meet future commercial needs. (Photo: Aaron Marsh/ Fleet Owner)


    That includes heavy duty diesel engines the company said will meet tightening emissions and efficiency requirements going forward. With the 2017 X15 weighing in at 2,950 lbs., the next iteration of the engine is going to shave off some 300 lbs. from that and has essentially been designed to fit into a 13L engine's "shell," engineers explained. Reporters got a glimpse of the new engine in prototype form.

    The goal is to deliver a 15L for 2022 that's capable of the same levels of horsepower, torque and durability but will weigh less and have a smaller footprint to allow for advanced fuel systems, emissions and after-treatment technology and placement — as well as being able to fit in new aerodynamic truck designs.

    The upcoming Cummins X12 12L diesel, geared toward regional haul and weight-sensitive vocational trucking applications, will arrive in March 2018. It'll be available with ratings of 350-475 hp/ 1,250-1,700 lbs.-ft. of torque but weighs only about 2,050 lbs., which Cummins engineers said is roughly 600 lbs. lighter than the nearest 13L competitor and 150 lbs. lighter than even the nearest 11L competitor.

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    The coming X12 and current and next-gen X15 engines utilize Cummins compact Single Module Aftertreatment product. They also share parts such as oil filters and turbos to help reduce costs for fleets with a mix of vehicles and configurations.

    Brett Merritt, executive director for on-highway business at Cummins, stressed the company's technical expertise and highlighted its wide product portfolio, noting the company is investing $700 million annually around the world in research and development.

    "We have the largest on-highway product offering in the globe. From 2.8L to 15L, from natural gas to diesel, we offer a wide array of solutions for our customers," he said. According to Merritt, Cummins' 2017 engine lineup has helped it reach an 80% share of the medium-duty North American commercial truck market, largely thanks to the B6.7 and L9 engines.

    "Whether the application be RV, package van, fire truck or bus, people in the market are choosing Cummins," Merritt said. "This suite of engines has become near-ubiquitous in the bus market, both transit and school, where we've reached over 90% share." Meanwhile, Cummins claims more than 37% market share in powering North American Class 8 trucks, a market to which the company remains "absolutely committed," he added.

    Alternatives and advancements

    Although Cummins believes diesel will remain the power source of choice for North American trucking for decades to come, the company is continuing to develop and invest in alternative fuel engines and technologies. It will also offer integrated powertrain solutions through its recently formed Eaton Cummins Automated Transmission Technologies joint venture.

    [​IMG]
    Cummins' AEOS electric Class 7 demonstration truck was unveiled at the press event Tuesday. (Photo: Aaron Marsh/ Fleet Owner)

    Stealing the show at the press event Tuesday was Cummins' "sneak peek" at the AEOS, a fully electric Class 7 demonstration truck with a max GVWR of 75,000 lbs. and a range of 100 miles per charge, which is extendable to 300 miles with additional battery modules. The truck features a Cummins Integrated Electrified Powertrain ahead of the company's 2019 target for market availability of such an electric option.

    Cummins also showcased its development of a high-efficiency spark-ignited technology "that can deliver diesel-like performance and durability" across a range of liquid fuels from ethanol to methanol and gasoline and can meet "the most stringent emissions requirements." At the Columbus technical facility, Cummins operates 88 test cells running diesel, natural gas, gasoline, ethanol, hydrogen, propane and biodiesel engines and has also invested in and continues to explore fuel cell power.

    Rob Neitzke, president of the Cummins Westport Inc. joint venture producing natural gas engines, pointed out that the latest Near-Zero 2018 powerplants — the B6.7N, L9N and ISX12N — are certified to the California Air Resources Board's NOx emission standards that are 90% lower than those of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

    He stressed the maturity of CNG technology as a fiscally viable option for the right markets and stability of natural gas prices, noting that fleets can purchase 3-4 year futures of the fuel.

    Connectivity

    The array of fuel and engine/powertrain options comes together with Cummins application of connectivity and data analytics. To that effect, Cummins formed a new internal organization in May led by Sherry Aaholm, chief information officer at Cummins, called the Digital Accelerator.

    [​IMG]
    Cummins' Srikanth Padmanabhan said the company's strategy is to offer the right powertrain technology for each marketplace. (Photo: Aaron Marsh/ Fleet Owner)

    It's meant to streamline innovation and bring concepts from idea to commercialization faster and complements Cummins' Connectivity Solutions division formed 15 years ago.

    Srikanth Padmanabhan, president of engine business at Cummins, explained that the point of the company's energy diversification in terms of commercial powertrains is to capitalize on disruptions globally while offering power solutions custom-tailored for individual markets and customers.

    "We will be the powertrain provider of choice for our customers, regardless of what the powertrain choice is in the on- and off-highway world," he contended. "Connectivity and electrification as disruptions are here — and we will capitalize on those disruptions much as we have with the other disruptions over the last few decades."

    Further, "we've succeeded in disruption because Cummins is a technology company that embraces change and capitalizes on that change with the right technology that matters for the marketplace and our customers," Padmanabhan said.

    Whatever the fuel for commercial vehicles, Cummins sees a unifying factor in data and computer control. That will allow the company to send over-the-air updates to reconfigure powertrains based on customers' particular needs, for example, while bringing maintenance to the prognostic and proactive.

    [​IMG]
    Cummins engines on display at the company's Technical Center in Columbus. (Photo: Aaron Marsh/ Fleet Owner)

    "We are able to start to see patterns that emerge, and out of those patterns we able to take care of reactive solutions for our customers in a shorter and shorter time frame," Padmanabhan noted. "But more importantly, we are thinking about them in a prognostic way and a proactive way and can help our customers fix the problems that they should never have in the first place."

    Going forward, Cummins sees a mix of internal combustion engines using a variety of fuels that will be necessary in the decades to come to meet commercial vehicle needs. But there will also be a variety of electric power based on geography, range/duty cycle and regulatory requirements, Padmanabhan contended, including fully electric, range-extended electric and hybrid electric configurations.

    And Cummins is hoping its global reach and established relationships will give it an edge in providing that range of power and powertrain options. "We're the people that understand the industry, that know the marketplace and know the customer applications," he said. "Whatever is going to come in the next 15 years, we will do the right thing in terms of making sure that the right technology for our customers matters, not just technology for the sake of technology."

    http://fleetowner.com/powertrain/cu...m=email&elq2=2d3754c501db45009216848bc6c43567
     
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    Owner-operator economic forecast
    overdrivemag



    Published on Sep 6, 2017
    Todd Amen, CEO of ATBS, reviews trends in owner-operator miles, net income and costs. He also offers predictions into 2018, including the economic impact of electronic logging devices. Amen addressed existing and prospective owner-operators at Overdrive’s Partner in Business seminars at last month’s Great American Trucking Show in Dallas.
     
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    Bill to delay ELD mandate fails

    Late night vote in House of Representatives scuttles effort to put off ELD implementation for two more years.
    Sep 7, 2017 Fleet Owner Staff

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    A bill to delay ELD mandate for two years failed by voice vote in the House of Representatives at 10 pm on Sept. 6. (File photo)

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    A bill introduced in July by U.S. Representative Brian Babin (TX-36) to prohibit funds from being used to implement or enforce the electronic logging device (ELD) mandate scheduled to go into effect on December 18 failed to pass in the House of Representatives last night.

    “The chair put the question on adoption of the amendment [to the members] and by voice vote announced that the noes had prevailed,” according to the Office of the Clerk.

    Industry advocates for the ELD mandate, especially the American Trucking Associations (ATA) trade group, cheered the results of the late-night vote

    “ATA has supported, and will support, this important regulation,” noted Chris Spear, the group’s president and CEO, in a prepared statement.

    “Congress has now voted a fourth time to move forward with electronic logging of the existing hours of service information required for decades,” he added. “Make no mistake, the time for debate about electronic logging is over, and we’re pleased that Congress has rejected this ill-conceived effort to delay their implementation. [The] vote should end what is left of this debate so our industry can carry on with the business of complying with this regulation.”

    http://fleetowner.com/driver-logs/b...m=email&elq2=d454351fec824b3d963c64324d493589
     
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    Technology in disasters: 3 ways today's telematics, GPS capabilities shine

    Sep 6, 2017 Aaron Marsh

    [​IMG]
    Flood conditions can continue well after the initial rain has fallen as water seeps off in rivers and streams and can overflow roadways. Texas Army National Guard soldiers are shown here conducting reconnaissance missions in Port Arthur, TX on Labor Day. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Melisa Washington)

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    Scenes from Hurricane Harvey recovery efforts


    With southeast Texas still licking wounds from Harvey and Irma already having led Florida to declare a state of emergency, the response to disasters today is relying — and enabled — more and more by improved telematics and GPS capabilities.

    It should come as little surprise. Among the many things that have changed significantly in the last dozen years since Hurricanes Katrina and Rita similarly caused catastrophic damage in the Gulf Coast region, one of the most prominent is the now nearly omnipresent smartphone, and with it wireless connectivity. Right alongside have come data and navigation capabilities closing in on the promise of "real time" information.

    Directly in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, as extended heavy rain kept much of Houston and some surrounding areas underwater, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner may have put it best as he repeatedly referred to the situation as "dynamic." That's the nature of something like a flood, where roads and suddenly become covered over or impassible with downed trees, power lines, debris and more.


    Even after flooding has receded, that can still remain the case as water overflows can leave roads and bridges less visibly damaged, possibly to fail in the days and weeks going forward. Long after it stops falling, rain will also continue to seep off into rivers and streams, pushing them beyond their usual boundaries and potentially further eroding infrastructure.

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    The response and resupplying efforts following Harvey — and perhaps still to come in the wake of this already overly active hurricane season — underscore how today's technology-enabled trucking and logistics network have been able to help get through and return things to normal.

    Fleet Owner caught up with Telogis, A Verizon Company, to hear about how telematics, GPS and routing technology have been improving the odds of getting through when it counts, particularly since Telogis' parent Verizon handles telecommunications — another critical focus following a disaster such as Harvey's flooding.

    •Providing evermore dynamic routing. As Harvey did its worst, hundreds of roads were simply underwater and inaccessible by road vehicles. But in the days to follow, roads had to be closed "on and off" much more dynamically, including major arteries into and around Houston, Austin and elsewhere, noted Kelly Frey, vice president of product marketing at Telogis.

    Note that as of Wednesday morning, Sept. 6, the Texas Dept. of Transportation reported that remaining flood conditions across southeast Texas are dissipating, but "rivers continue to discharge the unprecedented rainfall." The department noted that "closed or flooded conditions are still present on some major and minor routes, and could continue through the week."

    [​IMG]
    An aerial view showing extensive flooding from Harvey in a southeast Texas residential area back on Aug. 31. (Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel J. Martinez)


    Truck routing and navigation today can fold in continually updated reports. "Being able to shut down those roads and navigate around them is really a critical function to provide," Frey said.

    In one example of that, Telogis provides its Route Planning Suite and Telogis Navigation, he pointed out, which brings in dynamic information from local drivers on things like unexpected road blockages. Telogis then verifies the information with law enforcement or the local department of transportation; that's important both for re-routing trucks on the move and planning routes from the dispatcher's standpoint.

    "We verify that the road is closed or impassible, and then we put it in our [Telogis] Navigation so that trucks are navigating around it," Frey said. "But we also use it in our Route Planning Suite to create routes that won't go along those roads."

    •Enabling collaboration. There's a lot more to do in the wake of a massive flood like Houston has experienced than rescue efforts and just resupplying the area with basic necessities such as food and water. Other goods needed to repair and rebuild homes and businesses will remain stretched for weeks or months to come, for one, and there are many other facets to the response such as clearing trees and debris from roads and repairing cellular communications towers.

    Frey explained how telematics and GPS can facilitate efforts when outside help arrives, such as utilities companies sending vehicles and workers to Texas from surrounding states. A Telogis/Verizon collaborative function allows for "mutual aid response" so that an outside service provider or agency can share vehicle locations for a limited time period.

    "It almost looks like [the outside vehicles and workers] are their own vehicles, and they might be coming from three or four different service providers or utilities," Frey noted. "We've also got law enforcement agencies, fire departments and other first responders on our network, so you can imagine the power of transportation companies, utility companies, service providers like tree-cutting services, law enforcement and first responders being able to 'share' their fleet vehicles and worker locations so they can jointly coordinate a response with something like this."

    •Guiding and tracking atypical vehicles and response efforts. When a makeshift army of whatever's needed comes together in a situation like Hurricane Harvey rescue efforts, one thing helping organize, direct and track such efforts is that all-connectivity device in your pocket.

    In Houston, "you also had all those watercraft and even kayaks out there," Frey said. "If you've got your cell phone, you've also got location and communication" as long as cellular service is accessible.

    "Years ago, it wouldn't have been possible to keep everything connected," he added. "As crazy as it sounds, those [cell phones] were even helping dispatch boats to people who were in distress."

    And on that note, it's one more argument for making smartphones — particularly for those who might be pulled into rescue or recovery efforts in a disaster or emergency situation — more weather- and waterproof and impact-resistant.

    http://fleetowner.com/telematics/te...m=email&elq2=d454351fec824b3d963c64324d493589
     
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    The truckers bill of rights is so close to being right.
    J Canell



    Published on Sep 13, 2017
    Here is a link to the Black and Blue truckers bill of rights. Thank you Csmc Gen Craig!
    http://operationblackandblue.weebly.c...

    Or read it here: COMMERCIAL DRIVER BILL OF RIGHTS

    The Federal Government and State Governments alike have worked through the years to regulate the trucking industry for the interest to protect the general public from harm that the trucking industry may potentially cause. However they have neglected to take all matters of concern into account for the well being of the American truck driver. In some matters the members of the trucking industry have felt that the government has gone too far in their measure for safety, and have become counter productive. For our better interest, and the interest of the welfare of the general public the members of the trucking industry have established our Bill of Rights.

    1. ELD MANDATE - Trucker's should have a choice of whether they want to run with paper logs or electronic logs, ELD's should not be forced, by law, on a driver. Also, no driver should be monitored or expected to install an electronic tracking device that records times and is viewable to others including employers and government agencies, against his/her will.

    2. 14 HOUR RULE - Drivers should not be held to a continuous running clock. A truck driver should have the ability to stop and rest as needed without the consequence of running out of time to complete his/her task for the day.

    3. ABOLISHED the CSA SCORING SYSTEM - The CSA scoring system (Pre Employment Screening Program) is an abusive system in which case it records all data against a driver regardless of guilt as if the driver is guilty, negating the facts.

    4. PARKING AVAILABILITY - Due to the lack of safe and legal parking places for trucks, drivers are put in a situation that they may be forced to drive past their legal limits until they can find such places. Municipalities should be required to provide an adequate amount of space for truck parking to accommodate the amount of truck traffic doing business in their municipalities.

    5. Detention Pay - Drivers are required to legally log all of their on duty time for detention and should be paid for their time. They should be paid their cents per mile (CPM) at a rate of sixty miles per hour. Example: 42 CPM x 60 = 25.20 per hour.

    6. Lumper Fees/Fines - Drivers should not be held accountable for the company's cost of doing business. Trucking companies should negotiate, pay, and handle all business transactions with shippers, receivers,lumper services and law enforcement. Except when physical documentation may be required, such as taking pictures of damages.

    7. Lumping - Drivers should not be responsible for the loading or unloading of the freight. Their job is to supervise that the load is properly loaded and secured for transport.

    8. 24/7 DISPATCH - When drivers are required to work they should have the support of the company when as needed while in the operation of doing business.

    9. Driver Abandonment - When drivers are required to work away from home they should not be abandoned and left with the responsibility for their own transportation home.

    10. Regulations - Drivers are the only experienced individuals in the field of trucking and transportation. They should be the first voice heard in the regulatory process.

    11. Anti Idling Laws - Drivers should be comfortable in their living space and no law should force a driver to shut off the motor in temperatures that impede on a driver's ability to be comfortable. Especially, when a driver's health or life may be at risk.

    #jcanell #cdllife #trucking #365trucking
     
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    Trucking: You may know how to make money driver, but what do you do then?
    J Canell



    Published on Sep 19, 2017
    Take a lesson from Sammy B of MakeCents youtube channel.
    Here is his link:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCE9J...

    MakeCents is more than happy to lend a hand in understanding trucking finances.
     
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    Trucking: CRST Blames his GPS for him ending up on the New Jersey Boardwalk!
    J Canell



    Published on Sep 20, 2017
    Source information: http://www.fox29.com/news/local-news/...

    VENTNOR, N.J. (AP) - A CRST tractor trailer apparently made a wrong turn and got stuck on a boardwalk at the New Jersey shore.

    Workers in Ventnor spent Wednesday morning removing benches and railings to help the truck get off of the boardwalk.

    Police said that the tractor trailer first drove onto the boardwalk at Albany Avenue in Atlantic City early Wednesday. It then drove about 2 miles south, close to the end of the boardwalk in Ventnor.

    The truck wasn't able to make a turn onto a ramp to get off the boardwalk. The cab was later detached and driven off; a tow truck removed the trailer.

    It wasn't immediately known if the driver was facing any charges.
     
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    Truck stop interview with Lease Operator Daniel Adame!
    J Canell



    Published on Sep 21, 2017
    Daniel Adame is currently in the army as a truck driver and a Lease Operator here is a link to his channel:
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UComV...
     
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    The UGLY Truth About Trucking - Creeper at the Rest Stop
    Brittney Nicole Richardson



    Published on Jun 15, 2017
    The UGLY Truth About Trucking Creeper at the Rest Stop.
    From The Ugly Truck of Trucking series originally done by Run Hard Get Paid this time I wanted to share The Ugly Truth About Trucking in a Rest Stop, late at night as Female Truckers. Women Truckers have so much more to think about regarding safety especially when not running as a husband wife team like the Jade and John Show. As single women truckers there is so much more to think about when at a place like a rest stop, but that is just the Life of a Trucker alone int this 18 Wheeler Big Rig Tractor Trailer as I make my way over the road to my next load.

    Fan Page!
    http://www.Patreon.com/BrittneyNicole...

    Music By
    Deep Sea Gypsies - Woke up with the Blues
     
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    Dashcam Captures Scumbug Pulling A Truckers Kingpin After Leaving His Rig
    Kostadin Petrov



    Published on Mar 16, 2017
     
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    Changing culture could combat technician shortage

    Working with schools and embracing the next generation are ways to find and keep new, qualified technicians.
    Sep 22, 2017 Josh Fisher

    [​IMG]
    Culture changes and embracing the next generation of truck technicians is the best way combat the industry's technician shortage, experts said during Fleet Owner's recent Tackling the Truck Technician Shortage webinar.


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    It's not them, it's you.

    Culture changes and learning to how to embrace the next generation of truck technicians is the best way to combat the industry's technician shortage.

    That was the resounding message during Fleet Owner's recent Tackling the Truck Technician Shortage webinar, sponsored by Valvoline, which featured George Arrants, program director for national training and recruiting at the WheelTime Network, and Lew Flowers, president of Flowers Fleet Services, a former director of maintenance for the U.S. Postal Service, and a past chairman of the Technology & Maintenance Council (TMC).

    “Everybody is talking about this as a shortage,” Arrants noted. “But as an industry, do [we] have a shortage of applicants or do [we] have a shortage of qualified applicants? There are two different concerns.”

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    Based on surveys, he said the technician shortage is more of a qualified-applicants shortage. “If you are experiencing the same thing, this is an easier concern to address,” Arrants pointed out. “If you have a shortage of applicants, that one is a little more difficult because then we have to create the interest in the industry, put them through the education process and then put them into the workplace.”

    Companies facing technician applicant shortages is a problem likely due to location and special needs. But most of the time, Arrants stressed, trucking technician shortages are about not getting qualified applicants.

    Many of those applicants can become more qualified with better relationships between trucking organizations and educators, along with changing expectations and culture.

    Because, based on the statistics, there should be enough potential technicians to fill the growing need for them over the coming years, Arrants pointed out.

    The most recent Department of Labor figures on technicians, which include bus and truck mechanics as well as diesel engine specialists, are from 2008 to 2014. They also project the labor force increases needed 10 years out into the future from those reports, which are compiled every two years.

    That labor need is then further broken down into growth (more jobs) and replacement demand (those who leave the industry). That data breaks down as follows:
    • In 2008, there were 263,100 technicians, with a population of 278,000 projected in 2018, which would include 14,900 in growth and 60,400 to replace outgoing workers.
    • In 2010, there were 242,200 technicians; 277,400 projected in 2020, (35,200 growth, 52,600 to replace.
    • In 2012, there were 250,800 technicians; 272,500 projected in 2022 (21,600 growth, 53,500 replace).
    • In 2014, there were 263,900 technicians; 295,500 projected in 2024 (31,600 growth, 45,300 replace).
    [​IMG]
    click image to enlarge


    “You’ll find the biggest part of the need is replacement,” Arrants said. “Now a lot of people will say the replacement issue exists because those of us who are baby boomers -- the gray-hairs and the no-hairs -- we’re exiting the workforce. And that does make a lot of sense.

    “But the replacement issue also exists because these young people that are entering our industry sometimes aren’t on-boarded or moved into your companies in a positive and more comfortable way to the point where they are expected to be productive on the first day of the job,” he emphasized. “And somebody is on them pretty steadily. And they quit and go somewhere else.”

    In the U.S., 11,000 medium- to heavy-duty truck technicians graduate each year from the post-secondary level, which is any level after high school. “If you multiply that by 10 years,” Arrants said, noting the Labor department statistics, “we don’t have a shortage.”

    Even though the numbers don’t add up, many companies are reporting a technician shortage – and Arrants explained everyone in the industry is to blame.

    On top of that, truck technician educators aren’t teaching the skills needed by the trucking industry needs. “We in the industry need to be involved in telling the educators what we in the industry need,” he pointed out.

    For example, most technician schools are focused on engine repair, Arrants noted. “But those of us here in the industry know you aren’t going to put a 19-year-old on a $60,000 engine right out of the blocks,” he emphasized.

    Arrants stressed the need for truck industry leaders to be involved with the schools in their area to be sure the educators know what is required: “This is a national concern with a local solution.”

    [​IMG]

    If your business has high turnover among entry-level positions, it is probably not them; it’s you, according to George Arrants.
    He suggested that trucking companies encourage at least one employee get involved with schools in their local community. If local schools don’t have technician advisory committees, Arrants suggested motor carriers, truck dealerships and repair shops “team up” with other business partners in the area to encourage schools to form them.

    “Get that shop manager to show up at a local vocational school or whatever they are doing there to get involved,” added Flowers, noting that when you get inside the schools, you’ll also start to find potential talent.

    Flowers said his company is finding success by being a part of the Oklahoma Trucking Association's annual fair for technician students, which features skills demonstrations and recruitment tables. "If you feed them, they'll come -- and they'll stay," he noted.

    "That's a new idea that we've tried and it seems to be working pretty well," he added – encouraging others to work with their local trucking associations.

    Recognizing this is a different generation and tempering expectations, Arrants said, can also help end the technician shortage. Expecting a new hire, fresh out of school, to be productive his first week because that’s how it was in “my day,” is not reasonable, he stressed.

    “We need to bring these entry-level folks into our places of business and guide them through our organization and make sure they understand your culture and what is going on in your company so there can be a loyalty fostered,” Arrants noted.

    If your business has high turnover among entry-level positions, he added, it is probably not them; it’s you.

    He suggested mentoring programs and understanding more about the next generation. While people can complain about millennials, Arrants pointed out that, “we created this generation… and we need to understand a little bit more about how they think to get them to stay with us long term. Because we’ll find out that those who stay with us will be very productive.”

    http://fleetowner.com/maintenance/c...m=email&elq2=f47402944c6d40319d2c6b45613126ca
     
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    Truck maker Scania to appeal $1 billion fine over price fixing charges

    Five other truck makers reached settlement agreement last year
    Oct 1, 2017 Neil Abt




    [​IMG]
    Scania said “has co-operated fully with the European Commission” throughout the investigation. (Photo: Scania Group)

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    Scania Group said it would appeal a decision by the European Commission to charge the truck maker with a 880.5 million euro ($1.03 billion) fine for fixing truck prices between 1997-2011.

    “Scania strongly contests all the findings and allegations made by the European Commission, the company said in a statement. Scania added it “has co-operated fully with the European Commission by providing it with requested information and explanations throughout the entire investigation period.”

    Scania is a unit of Volkswagen AG. The European Commission ruled against the truck maker one year after five competitors reached an agreement over charges of price fixing and how to pass on costs of new emissions technologies.


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    Scania previously set aside $470 million to cover a potential penalty after the manufacturers were fined about 3 billion euros. The other companies involved in the scandal were Daimler, DAF, Iveco, MAN and Volvo/Renault.

    "This cartel affected very substantial numbers of road haulers in Europe, since Scania and the other truck manufacturers in the cartel produce more than nine out of every 10 medium and heavy trucks sold in Europe," Margrethe Vestager, European Union competition commissioner, said in a statement.

    http://fleetowner.com/trucks/truck-...m=email&elq2=40782d9da93e4f95b98a49acd5f31764
     
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    Democratic lawmakers seek mandatory sleep apnea testing for truckers

    Commuter train crashes spark action after Trump administration chooses not to move forward with rule making
    Oct 1, 2017 Neil Abt

    [​IMG]
    A group of federal lawmakers representing New York and New Jersey want to require sleep apnea testing for commercial truck drivers. (File photo)


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    Democratic lawmakers from New York and New Jersey have introduced legislation that would mandate the screening and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea for commercial truck drivers and rail workers.

    The legislation would require the Department of Transportation to overturn President Trump's decision to not move forward on an apnea rulemaking. The legislation was introduced in the Senate late last week by Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, as well as Cory Booker and Robert Menendez of New Jersey. U.S. Reps. Bill Pascrell Jr. and Albio Sires introduced a companion bill in the House.

    The lawmakers have been outspoken on the apnea issue after several recent deadly commuter rail incidents that have been blamed on the disease.

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    “The recent findings released by [the National Transportation Safety Board] on the Hoboken and [Long Island Railroad] crashes underscore just how shortsighted and reckless the Trump administration’s recent decision was to reverse the rule requiring sleep apnea testing and treatment,” said Booker. “We simply cannot stand idly by and wait for the next tragic incident.”

    NTSB’s has listed battling sleep apnea as one of its top desired safety goals. It has listed apnea as the probable cause of 10 rail and highway crashes in the past 17 years.

    In March 2016, the federal government published an advance notice of proposed rulemaking and sought feedback whether mandatory screening should be required for certain workers. The decision not to move forward was made pubic in early August.

    “Many large truck drivers are pushed to work long shifts with irregular schedules and often without adequate sleep. OSA is a serious medical condition that, when left untreated, contributes to driver fatigue, a well-known and well-documented safety hazard,” said Jackie Gillian, president of Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety.

    http://fleetowner.com/collision-pre...m=email&elq2=ef2f2aa720f0449c8fb5784dcc213ff8
     
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    Four reasons your drivers trust their devices even when they lie

    Oct 3, 2017 Larry Kahaner


    [​IMG]
    Why do we often trust our computers, smartphones and vehicle sensors even when they're obviously giving us bad information? Jaco Hamman, associate professor at Vanderbilt Divinity School, says it's usually because of four forces that play together. (Photo: Aaron Marsh / Fleet Owner)


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    It's happened yet again.

    A trucker in mid-September drove his 18-wheeler on a pedestrian-only New Jersey boardwalk for nearly three miles before being stopped by a police officer. The driver, whose truck damaged 100 ft. of railing and the boardwalk during its removal, told police that he was just following his GPS. This was the second time in two months that a truck took the boardwalk route.

    Following a GPS-suggested route is commonplace, but why wouldn't drivers stop immediately when they realized they were no longer on a road?

    Moreover, why do we often trust our computers, smartphones and vehicle sensors even when they're obviously giving us bad information – and what can drivers do about it?

    Jaco Hamman, associate professor of religion, psychology, and culture at Vanderbilt Divinity School, studies this issue and has written about how machines and humans interact. He is also a long-distance motorcycle rider who uses both maps and GPS during his countrywide journeys.

    "When it comes to a GPS I think there are at least four forces that play together about why people follow a GPS down the wrong path,” he explained. First, Hamman notes that as infants we learn to be compliant to the wishes of others because we depend upon them for our nurturing, food and other life-giving items. This compliance has now spread to our devices. "We are so trained to be compliant to the notifications that we get from our screens. That compliancy mirrors the compliancy we learned in early childhood."

    He adds that this compliancy is magnitudes more pronounced in younger people. "Young folks, because they grew up so close with handheld technology, have a deeper trust but there's also a deeper dependency compared to older generations. Research from various other angles totally validates that younger drivers, more inexperienced drivers, will definitely rely on technology more than seasoned drivers. There is no doubt about it."

    This explanation resonates with experienced truckers like Joseph Graham who has been driving for more than 20 years. He cites a lack of 'situational awareness' among less experienced drivers especially those who have always had GPS and never had to use paper maps. "In the process of the technology that has entered the industry, I think we've lost a little bit of our situational awareness that the older caliber of driver still has, but the new drivers haven't had the chance to develop yet to keep them out of trouble zones." Graham, who says he embraces new technologies, still checks for hot tires with his hand and always double checks his Google Maps with map books if he's new to a route.

    His experience behind the wheel also tells him not to trust his sensors or fuel gauges 100% of the time. "A fuel gauge is mechanical just like many other devices and can give false readings … When you know your truck and do your trip planning, you pretty much know on the fly how much fuel you have left. By checking your mileage versus just letting the fuel gauge do it, you get the ability to say, 'hey, wait a minute. There's something wrong with this truck. I should've got X amount of miles out of this tank of fuel, and I only got this. Is it because of the train? Was I heavy or was there a problem?’"

    Hamman said the second reason why drivers overly trust their screens is that they become preoccupied with the information it's giving. "For instance, if I am engrossed in a play activity, I can be preoccupied with that, [and that's a good thing]. I also can be preoccupied in a moment of creativity while I'm writing or painting, but there's also a kind of preoccupation that inhibits. When people get preoccupied with what happens on a screen, it inhibits that deeper functioning of thought processes you would hope would be there but suddenly it's just not there."

    The third reason is "the myth of multitasking … Research shows that only about two and a half percent of the world's population can really multitask. If multitasking would be following a GPS screen carefully while actually observing my environment, looking at the road, at a dock, things like that, I would say about two and a half percent of the world's population can probably do that well. But as people try to multitask, like driving big rig, a car or motorbike while they are focusing in a preoccupied way on the GPS, they absolutely will lose the capacity to take in their environment."

    The fourth and last reason is anxiety. "If people are in a new city or area they will be anxious. We know from studies that looking at a screen such as a GPS or phone that our body releases oxytocin and dopamine into our system. Dopamine makes us feel more relaxed. The oxytocin actually instills a sense of trust that here's a connection between me and this device. So I'm anxious because I'm under the clock. I have to make this delivery in a certain time. The more I get anxious, the more I look at the screen, which actually makes me feel more relaxed because dopamine is released into my system just by looking at the screen." He adds: "If you are always under the clock, it's impossible to function optimally. Then the GPS comes in and says, 'I will help you function optimally.'"

    What's the answer to overly trusting gadgets?

    "Experience," Hamman said. "Technology gives just knowledge. I look at the gauge and it says my tire pressure is fine, but sensors go bad. Learning how to check your tires another way is wisdom … As you mature in being a driver, you get more wise and you probably rely less on technology that only gives you knowledge. That input of data is really important but it's not everything."

    Another driver, Bobby, who asked that his real name not be used, embraces truck technology that has proven itself to him. "I trust the tire pressure monitors because they've had a long track record of working correctly for me. Since I installed them a few years ago I haven't had any tire failures at all. I am alerted of a tire leak and I can quickly fix it before the tire blows."

    Bobby is an owner-operator with more than 15 years on the road. He says that experience has shown him when to trust sensors. "A lane departure system will give false warnings when the sun is shining on the highway in a certain way. The system sees lines on the pavement and thinks they are line markers. The collision avoidance system uses metal detecting radar and sometimes it picks up guard rails when the truck is pointed in a certain way and will sometimes activate the braking system unnecessarily and unsafely. I always err on the side of caution, but [some sensors] can make it frustrating for the driver."

    http://fleetowner.com/driver-manage...m=email&elq2=b3ff11cc9a294c27bb7529186cdaf0ac
     
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    Gazing into trucking's crystal ball for insights

    Oct 12, 2017 by Sean Kilcarr in Trucks at Work


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    So much is happening in the trucking industry right now – the impending imposition of the electronic logging device (ELD) mandate; the push for driverless trucks, even as the need for truck drivers remains acute; the heavily congested and deteriorating state of U.S. highways; the upswing in freight rates – that it’s almost hard to take it all in.

    One thing is for certain, though: the frenetic level of activity now being experienced in the freight transport world is only going to keep gaining speed.

    So how will all of that impact your particular trucking company?

    For starters, Rich Voreis, CEO of Marquette Transportation Finance, offers a few broad-based “30,000-foot view” insights for truckers. To wit:

    Regulations will chart a new course for the industry: As with many industries, regulatory oversight can add training time, expenses and processes to everyday operations, Voreis explained. For trucking, on December 18 this year, the compliance phase of the ELD mandate begins as drivers and fleets must start using Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMSCA) approved ELDs in their vehicles.

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    “This regulatory change to improve drive time accuracy can be a burden on a company’s operational capital,” he said. “Smaller companies may be unable to absorb the costs of implementing ELDs, while larger companies will have much higher costs associated with compliance. And, no matter the company size, some efficiency will be lost as employees are trained to use the new systems.”

    Voreis also believes ELD compliance may decrease cash flow and increase expenses for some motor carriers, while others may leverage this technology “opportunity” to pick up new business.

    “As [motor] carriers exit the market, savvy [trucking] companies can pick up the slack which will require flexible financing to support rapid growth, even in an uncertain climate,” he stressed. “In the tightening financial environment, obtaining financing to grow—and quickly—can be a challenge.”

    [​IMG]
    Rich Voreis


    The cost of managing risk is rising: Insurance costs are a given in the transportation industry, said Voreis, yet insurance rates have risen more in transportation than any other commercial market—up 4% in the second quarter of this year after a 5% hike in the first quarter, according to MarketScout.

    That increase, compared to only 1% and 2% for other industries, will again impact cash flow and profit margins across the trucking industry, he noted.

    The worsening driver shortage: Motor carriers across the nation continue to face a shortage of qualified, reliable drivers to meet freight demand, Voreis said, with inactive trucks still requiring all of the costs of maintenance and insurance without generating offsetting income.

    Indeed, as Randy Seals, customer advocate at McLeod Software, noted in a recent panel of driver demographics, based on the current trends lines of freight demand versus driver availability, a potential shortfall of 239,000 drivers may develop by 2022.

    Marquette’s Voreis believes three main factors are at work in this shortage: industry growth outpacing driver supply, the need to replace the large percentage of retiring drivers, and the lack of qualified drivers. He added that finding drivers will remain a “top concern” among motor carriers in the coming years.

    Mergers and acquisitions will increase: Required regulatory compliance combined with the aforementioned higher costs of risk management and keeping trucks on the road may result in more motor carriers choosing to exit the market, Voreis said. This shift could increase the merger and acquisition opportunities for nimble companies ready to expand their market share. Yet due to all the uncertainties that lay ahead, lenders may offer less financial flexibility.

    “If the number of [motor] carriers diminishes, but the remaining businesses are not able to take on the freight volume due to financial restrictions, the industry may see increasing volatility ahead,” he warned.

    Traditional financing will become more challenging: All of the above factors are creating more unpredictability in the transportation market, and this last one may have the most pervasive reach, Voreis thinks: Traditional lenders, like banks, have increasingly limited appetite to finance an industry with high cash flow needs and uncertain expenses.

    “Fewer traditional banks are willing to lend to transportation companies, and those that do will likely require conservative loan structures with restrictive covenants, and may tighten controls on current loans,” he explained. “Taking advantage of opportunities ahead – such as mergers, acquisitions, and expansion to handle increased business volume – may require freight companies to leverage themselves, other collateral or more receivables beyond many banks’ credit controls.”

    All of the above, of course, make things more difficult for truckers. However, in a “glass is half full” take on recent trends, John Larkin – managing director and head of transportation capital markets research for Stifel Capital Markets – noted in a recent presentation to the Iowa Motor Truck Association that other competitive pressures on trucking may be easing.

    [​IMG]
    John Larkin. Photo: Aaron Marsh/Fleet Owner


    Take rail intermodal, for example. “People worry about rail intermodal but rail intermodal service, in a word, sucks. And it will suck because the railroads focus on operating ratio as their primary metric; that’s all they care about,” he explained.

    Right now, based on rail service data from the time freight leaves the gate at the front of a terminal to the time the intermodal container box is placed on a chassis and ready to be pulled by draymen, on-time performance ranges between 65% and 80%, he said.

    “That’s the standard range; often it’s below that,” Larkin added. “If the railroads could ever get their service act together, [intermodal] would be a true play but I don’t see that happening any time soon given the focus on driving [their] operating ratios lower.”

    Longer term, though, Larkin said that trucking needs to focus on two other issues that may significantly hinder its efficiency: the deteriorating state of highway infrastructure and whether tractor-trailer specs relied to haul freight need a specification overhaul in light of the rapid growth of e-commerce.

    “We have an infrastructure problem in this country; we built the greatest highway system the world has ever seen thanks to the vision of General Eisenhower but we’re not doing a very good job of ‘de-bottlenecking’ that system,” he said.

    “We’re not doing a very good job of indexing the income in the Highway Trust Fund to account for inflation. Construction costs inflate just like everything else does and we haven’t taken that into account; we need to fix that somehow,” Larkin added.

    “Congress [was] willing to put 20 or so taxes into Obamacare but we don’t want to put one tax or increase in existing tax to take care of something we all need,” he stressed. “[Highways] are an integral part of our logistics supply chain; I think most people would be willing to pay for a highway they use. Toll roads have been very successful in places like Florida [and] Texas.”

    [​IMG]


    Then there is the issue of long combination vehicles and moving to twin 33-ft. trailers – a very contentious issue among motor carriers, much less in the public square, where “bigger trucks” and any such related term are anathema.

    “The parcel industry and Amazon e-commerce industry would love twin 33s because so much of their freight tends to cube out before it weighs out and 33s which are more stable operationally would really help keep the number of trucks more manageable,” Larkin argued.

    Moving to bigger twin trailers could “sort of” help with the driver shortage, too, as beefing up the freight hauling capacity of existing tractor-trailers would decrease the need for more capacity, but Larkin readily admits there is a “fair amount of opposition” to that strategy, especially among traditional 53-ft. trailer-based TL carriers.

    “There’s also question as to whether distribution centers, big country plants are set up to load 33s instead of 53s; they’d probably need more loading doors or at least some kind of yard hustling operation which adds expense,” Larkin pointed out.

    “Then you have the dolly management, you always have too many dollies in the wrong place at the wrong time just like you have too many [container] chassis in the wrong place at the wrong time in intermodal,” he said.

    “I don’t know what’s going to happen with that but it does raise the question if you can’t get twin 33s through Congress how the heck are you going to get autonomous trucks through Congress? Soon at least, I mean it seems like an almost impossible task,” Larkin noted. “Congress can’t agree on whether the sky looked blue or gray today.”

    Taken together, Voreis and Larkin offer a lot of interesting trends for trucking to keep tabs on. Whether those trends end up favoring or harming the industry will be the ultimate question in need of answering.

    http://fleetowner.com/blog/gazing-t...m=email&elq2=6ef468cf5fc94f23919a242e1111296d
     
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    Trucking: Time to go behind the curtain of UBER FREIGHT.
    J Canell



    Published on Oct 15, 2017
    In the comments below is where the action should take place.
    Do not waste this opportunity to be heard.
    Ask your question of UBER FREIGHT in the comment section
    If you already see your question then like the one that is there.
    I will go in and pin the most liked questions.
    Share this video out to whoever and where ever.
    Hit the like button.

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    Truck drivers are the working poor.
    J Canell



    Published on Oct 12, 2017
    Run the basic math yourself and then start really digging down into the money you're owed.
     
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    Response to truck drivers the Working Poor
    Truck Driver 101



    Published on Oct 12, 2017
    This video is in no way a boof just a discussion. I discuss how money works and how companies decide what's pay their employees. Truck drivers often think we should get paid to sleep and that truck drivers salaries or wages are just not enough. I simply explained because of the con of the hourly pay.
     
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    Why won't diabetic drivers listen to their doctors?

    Truck drivers suffer from diabetes at a rate almost 50% higher than the rest of Americans because they have more risk factors, physicians note.
    Oct 16, 2017 Larry Kahaner

    [​IMG]
    Most doctors prefer not to prescribe medicines for Type 2 diabetes if it can be controlled in other ways, like with diet and exercise.

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    Four reasons your drivers trust their devices even when they lie


    A truck driver's life is a recipe for diabetes, and the statistics prove it. In the U.S., about 9.4% of the population has diabetes according to the Centers for Disease Control. For truckers, that number is 14%.

    Why do truckers suffer from diabetes at a rate almost 50% higher than the rest of Americans? They have more risk factors, physicians say. Drivers smoke more – about half of truck drivers smoke compared to 19% of other adults – they rarely exercise and their diet is high in calories and fat. Also, almost 70% of truck drivers are obese, which is more than twice the nation average. "See Obesity and other risk factors: the national survey of U.S. long-haul truck driver health and injury."

    Physicians like Dr. Albert Osbahr who treat truck drivers among other patients, say they’re taken aback when drivers are surprised when they're disqualified. "They have numbers that are high and wonder why we might give them short cards or might actually, in some cases, disqualify them when their numbers are 450 or 500. They'll look at me in disbelief and say: 'Why would you do that?' I say, 'This is not stable. This is not safe.'"

    The American Diabetes Association recommends aiming for a blood sugar level between 70 to 130 mg/dl (milligrams per deciliter) before meals and less than 180 mg/dl one to two hours after a meal. Fasting before a blood test gives the most accurate reading.

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    "If we don't find ways to improve this we'll have more guys with eye problems, heart problems, kidney problems, stroke-like symptoms or sensation problems because of diabetes," noted Osbahr, who is the medical director of occupational health services at Spartanburg (SC) Regional Healthcare System and a Board of Trustees Member of the American Medical Association.

    "Weight loss is very crucial to diabetes control,” he added. “I've seen dramatic control of diabetes Type 2 when people lose weight. The two key issues in terms of weight – as long as there's not something else in the way like another disease such as thyroid or a medication that is causing extra weight – are exercise and diet."

    About 90 to 95% of people with diabetes have Type 2, a condition in which your body doesn't use insulin properly, a malady also known as 'insulin resistance.' Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas that allows your body to produce sugar from carbohydrates in food. This sugar (glucose) gives you energy which is why one of the first signs of diabetes is fatigue. Type 1 diabetes is rarer and usually presents itself in children as the pancreas may be dysfunctional from birth and not produce any insulin. People with Type 1 diabetes must take insulin every day, usually by injection. Contrary to what some people believe, Type 2 diabetes cannot become Type 1 diabetes. They are different diseases.

    Because of how well medications work on Type 1 diabetes, The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has proposed that drivers who use insulin may no longer need a medical waiver to drive but instead can get certified annually by their health care provider that their diabetes is well controlled by insulin.

    Osbahr repeats what he says to every trucker with diabetes. "When I see guys in the office and they raise the issue [of how to lose weight] I say, 'Add a little extra to your regular activities. Any little bit of extra exercise, walking, even doing some flexibility calisthenics for 15 minutes while you're getting ready to sleep or getting up in the morning can help. Probably the biggest thing is parking farther away from the truck stop [building], making that walk in and out and do that [extra walking] with any other kind of activity."

    The other thing I say is 'you guys have to inspect your trucks. Why don't you make multiple trips around your truck in your inspection, but make it like a walk? You don't need a gym or a running track. You can add some jumping jacks if you can. You can do some knee-ups if you can. You can do some running in place if you want to, but everybody is probably able to at least walk and that does not require any additional equipment.'"

    As for diet, Osbahr concedes that truckers have fewer healthy options on the road than most workers. "The foods that are offered on the road are not very good; they're also high caloric. You have to work to find the right ones. And I tell a lot of the guys, 'How many fat vegetarians have you seen?' Most of the guys will laugh and say, 'You're right; there are not too many of them.' I tell them, 'Yeah I've seen a few, but not that often.' There is something [healthier] about eating vegetables and fewer starches, breads and meats, even though I love them. There's something to be said for eating more vegetarian foods. You probably would lose more weight, but we don't always see those options on the road…. In general, the lifestyle of a trucker does not lend itself well to losing weight. There's no question about that."

    Dr. Adrian Vella, who studies Type 2 diabetes at the Mayo Clinic and sees patients about 40% of his time, said that if he had to choose one thing for truckers to do that would prevent or handle diabetes it would be diet. "To me, the most important thing is the amount of calories you eat compared to the amount of energy expended during the day. The second most important thing is what those calories consist of. In general, it would be a good idea to avoid high-fat, calorie-dense foods."

    "Nine times out of 10 they're [patients] are doing bad things,” he added. “They are not compliant or following recommendations, and I understand that this is difficult for truck drivers. The other issue is what physicians face when they're trying to choose medications for their patients. They want to avoid hypoglycemia at all costs for obvious reasons."

    Some diabetes medicines cause hypoglycemia or low blood sugar which is deadly for drivers as it can cause blurry vision, poor coordination, tiredness and confusion.

    Both Vella and Osbahr say that most doctors would prefer not to prescribe medicines for diabetes if it can be controlled in other ways, but often they have no choice as many patients are non-compliant when it comes to diet and exercise.

    Osbahr knows that treating diabetes, especially in truckers, is an uphill battle. "The biggest problem I find is a lot of guys not taking care of themselves… It is hard for us as humans to stay disciplined in a way to take care of ourselves and truckers are no different than the rest of us non-truckers. Motivation seems to come only when bad things happen to our health. Plus, most of the truckers are men and we, as men, do not keep up on our health like we should."

    Unfortunately, he sees truck drivers and diabetes as indicative of our nation's future. "We're not talking about just truckers who are a window into what our culture is doing. Our culture has gotten heavier and truckers are at the extreme."

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