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Pallets of canning jars?

Discussion in 'Survival (Preps & Homestead)' started by porcupine73, Jan 19, 2013.



  1. porcupine73

    porcupine73 Seeker Seeker

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    Would it be silly to simply buy say a pallet of quart and pint canning jars? Attract too much attention? I could buy them slowly I guess over time locally. I just thought the pallet load might be easier. It would be tricky though since I know they want $80+ for liftgate service. Most places that will make residential deliveries I know are kind of friendly in that matter, they'll break open the pallet for you and hand you the items down off the truck even without liftgate. Just trying to get some stuff lined up ... thanks!
     
  2. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Modal Operator/Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    Buy the pallet if you can use them.


    You could co-op them with others...:hmmmm2:
     
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  3. porcupine73

    porcupine73 Seeker Seeker

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    Thanks, right on, I forgot about that, I would be buying for a group, not just myself. Well I was just thinking say for quarts some people suggest having 80 dozen on hand. It looks like the pallet is 60 dozen. Though hm even the online prices in that quantity are not much lower than Wally's puls there'd be shipping.
     
  4. Prairie Ogre

    Prairie Ogre Seeker

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    Absolutely buy jars by the pallet. I got the idea from watching the goings-on at a local jelly factory (small). Was going by one day and they were unloading jars w a forklift. I play cards w the owner, so it was an easy fix to get in on the orders when id like.

    Also, ordering on the ace hardware site offers (or used to) free shipping of ordered items to any ace store. I bought 15 cases of half gallon jars that way a few yrs ago. saved a bundle on shipping.

    PO
     
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  5. Prairie Ogre

    Prairie Ogre Seeker

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    oh and dont forget lots of extra lids. I would also go with the pallet on these.

    PO
     
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  6. jogslvr

    jogslvr Gold Miser Gold Chaser

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    In season you can buy jars in smaller quantities just as cheap, as some stores (like Big Lots) use them as loss-leaders just prior and during canning season.

    I looked at jar buying from every angle when I was in the honey business and the above was the cheapest way to procure them, for me. YMMV
     
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  7. TnAndy

    TnAndy retired guy Midas Member

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    I bought a pallet load about 10 years back from a local hardware store that sold truckloads of them to local beekeepers and fund raisers ( they put boiled peanuts in them and sold for a charity deal ). They had a whole building out back with what must have been 1/2 dozen tractor trailers loads in it. A pallet load was an everyday thing to them. Wide mouth quarts were in the 7 buck/case range. These were Golden Harvest.....which some folks don't like, say they are a cheaply made jar compared to Ball/Kerr....but we've had very little breakage out of them over the years. Unless you can get Ball at almost the same price, I wouldn't spend extra on them.

    My thinking is 2 quart jars per day of food per family member per day for a year is a good place to start. Probably won't use that much, but it can't hurt to have them IF you have the room to store.

    Then lids, lids, and more lids. Pallet of 60 jars, they'll come with a ring and lid.....but then you need 60 dozen to replace that first round. The jar isn't much good without the lid.....and right now, lids are where silver rounds and ammo was a few years back..... If the SHTF, -----> LIDS <----- are gonna be golden.....jars will be everywhere.

    Got a 635 buck back order into Goodmans ( Goodmans.net ) for 240 dozen wide mouth, and 60 dozen narrow mouth lids to restock some holes in my preps. I try to keep 5k to 8k lids around. I vacuum seal them as soon as they come in.
     
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  8. Ishkabibble

    Ishkabibble Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Surprised nobody has mentioned Tattler lids. I purchased a bulk pack and have been very pleased. They work for both wet and dry canning. I've had no failures.

    If lids become as precious as some suggest they will be, why would one choose disposable? I use the cheap lids for food I will give away, everything else gets a Tattler.

    As to the bulk purchase of jars... I chose an alternate method. Our local thrift sells jars at $3 a dozen. I purchased all their wide mouth masons, a case at a time when I was searching out other deals. It isn't as fast as buying a flat, but for those who want lots of jars and don't mind waiting, it certainly works. Many of our local canners put free ads in the online classifieds. I'm not sure that saves anything due to fuel costs, but it's an observation which may help. On a big haul, it could save quite a bundle. The typical buy price in our classifieds is $1.50 to $2 per dozen.

    If you do buy a pallet, think about getting the widemouth masons with tapered sides. They can be frozen, so they're a little more versatile than standard jars. Jelled food and stuck contents are also more easily dislodged from these jars.
     
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  9. goldie40

    goldie40 Silver Member Silver Miner

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    80 dozen is really not that many for a family of four. A hundred twenty dozen is more what they would need. you should always have a few hundred jars left every yr to allow for a bad crop or no crop.we're alway using jars of food that we canned a couple to five yrs ago. If chicken, turkey or anything went on a real sale, we'd grab enough to can them or like last fall we got a great deal on apples so we canned a couple hundred jars, some into sauce and some into sliced apples, even winter squashs. we use over a hundred jars just for the stock left when cooking turkeys and chickens that we canned. I advertised for canning jars in the local papers a few yrs ago and bought over 42 dozen, many still in the boxes for less than a dollar a dozen. you'd be supprised at how many jars people have in their basements that they want to get rid of and don't have the ambition to carry them to the street. one place had 3 large plastic barrels of jars that they sold me for ten dollars a barrel if I carried them out. no problem, i just took 20 boxes with me, the jars cost me about 10 cents a piece and the barrels were free.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2013
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  10. goldie40

    goldie40 Silver Member Silver Miner

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    I don't understand why you would want to freeze the jars, when he power goes out, the properly canned food is still safe when all the food in the freezer is gone
     
  11. Ishkabibble

    Ishkabibble Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    That's a really good question which deserves discussion. The tapered jars are functional within the entire temperature range of my natural environment, while the others start failing at lower temperatures. The non-tapered jars are still great, but they are more dependent on a climate controlled environment which I may be unable to maintain post SHTF. Here are a few reasons which relate to me, and likely others who experience freezing in the winter:

    I use wood heat and need to be around to stoke the fire and add wood, but sometimes that isn't possible. My house must be able to stand on it's own, without human care for a reasonable amount of time. Unexpected events like storms, injuries... I have experienced situations where I had to hunker down somewhere before returning home, and I can think of many more which I have not experienced but could. Similar possibilities include a damaged stove or stovepipe, whereby a wood stove needs to be repaired; where someone is quite sick and must bundle well instead of tending the fire; or when damage to the home prevents proper heating, say a broken window or roof damaged by a fallen tree limb. In all those cases, I need the home and it's contents to endure without my attention.

    As a point for those who rely on electricity or gas for heat, I look at Eastern Canada's ice storms of 1998. People within the city had to operate with no electricity for up to a week, some of them as much as ten days. Gas was cut off for safety reasons. In that situation, food in freezers could be transferred outside, but canned food in jars... well it had to stay warm. A lot of people lost their personal canning that year. Luckily they could just buy and grow food again after the event, but what a loss and it could have been worse. It takes only a few off-grid days in the winter, if one doesn't have a self-sustaining home, to end a significant portion of one's wet canned supplies. In that situation, the tapered jars were a boon, and I know many Eastern Canadians will only use tapered jars now for that reason.

    Some may intentionally freeze the jars in winter as I would, post SHTF. I can pack a deer into canning jars quite quickly, but pressure canning those jars on a wood stove takes a lot of time, wood, and attention. If the jars can be frozen, I can put my meat and broth into them, place them somewhere cold, and then thaw and pressure can them when I have the time. Meat I will eat in that winter won't even need to be pressure canned, instead it can sit in the jars where pests cannot touch it, placed anywhere that temperatures are below freezing. In winter, the jars I do need to pressure can, I would do over time. Extending this out would enable me to save wood, because I would can enough to keep the house at a comfortable temperature without generating waste heat in the canning process. Now I mention a deer, but it could apply to anything I wish to can in volume, post SHTF. And while one could loose pack raw meat and food into any canning jars for the benefit I've listed here, it would be more difficult to remove without heating, and one could not include broth.

    I have had jars freeze in a cellar before.The ones in the front of my stacks were fine, but those against the wall on the top shelves of an outside wall were not. I only had a couple jars burst, but the mess they made... wow.

    Those are a few of my reasons.

    :s9:
     
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  12. porcupine73

    porcupine73 Seeker Seeker

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    Ah interesting info, yes having the flexibility to allow them to freeze if necessary sounds nice.

    I decided to go the 'slow and steady' route of acquiring a maybe half a dozen - dozens each week from the local Ace Hardware. Prices are good, plenty in stock, plus they often have coupons out there.

    I usually get the 'wide mouth' type, pints and quarts - is that the right style? Or should I be getting the regular mouth? I'm not completely clear on the tapered vs. non-tapered.

    I like the wide mouth because it's easier to get larger stuff in and out, and I can fit my hand in it to wash them.

    Can I can up say 'soups' with veggies and broth in them? I think these would be perfect in smaller jars as a whole meal pretty much. I'd love to take those backpacking.
     
  13. Ishkabibble

    Ishkabibble Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    This is what tapered jars looks like.

    290164d1351386712-tall-jars-dsc_0315.jpg

    When they freeze, the expansion causes the contents to slide upwards instead of out, so the jar doesn't burst. You can store anything in them. All of my ready-to-heat homemade meals are stored in these. I bring mine camping and hiking. I put them inside a pot in my day pack, so they won't break if I trip or fall. I prefer the widemouth masons for all the reasons you mention, but own lots of shallow standard jars for things like spices and condiments.
     
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  14. goldie40

    goldie40 Silver Member Silver Miner

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    ok , I see now.my basement is still above freezing even after a few days of 0 whether outside so I've never thought about things feeezing and there's always someone there..we have a few hundred large mouth pint jars that are tapered
     
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  15. Fatboy

    Fatboy Silver Member Site Supporter Silver Miner

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  16. Professur

    Professur Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    The Great Ice Storm .. we were without power for 3 weeks ... 20 minutes from montreal. Small, non priority area. Didn't matter .. after the first 2 days, we lost all the water lines and the hot water tank and a short took out the (badly installed by previous owner) heating wires. It was spring before I got things square enough that we could move back.
     
  17. porcupine73

    porcupine73 Seeker Seeker

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    Great thanks, I think I see. The pint looks like the largest size, at least in the wide mouth version, that doesn't narrow at the neck. Quarts on up narrow at the neck so I'm guessing those are likely to crack if frozen. Though I've seen some people claim they are able to freeze liquid in the quarts without a problem if they leave 2" headspace.

    I may try some freezing in the quarts as an experiment to see how much they can take. I'd like to be able to freeze milk in them for one. Bone broth as well if it will do it without cracking.

    Hm lot of the online places seem to be out of widemouth lids. I saw a whole box at Ace, though they were $3.50/box of 12, maybe better get them nonetheless.
     
  18. tgidave

    tgidave New Member

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    This is where I got my lids:

    http://www.fillmorecontainer.com/Wide-Mouth-Canning-Lids-Bulk-86mm-P170.aspx

    I went ahead and got the box of 6 sleeves. Shipping was about $60. Seems the price has gone up a little in the last two weeks...

    Dave
     
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  19. Ishkabibble

    Ishkabibble Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    I managed to get a few 1.5 pint jars that taper to the top, but they are not common. The ones I found were Bell freezer jars from the '50s. They say 'Can or Freeze' on the side, nothing else. The tapered pints are very common; that's most of what I have. I have never found tapered quarts, but I'd snap 'em up fast if I did.

    If you want reusable lids, Tattler bulk packs seem to go on sale about every three months. The sales are short, so subscribe to their tweets if you want to catch a deal.
     
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  20. porcupine73

    porcupine73 Seeker Seeker

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    Great thanks. I'll be working on it. My first order of business is to can up a couple dozen pints of stew. I was just stuck on the thruway for only 30 minutes because of an accident in the snowstorm but it seemed like an eternity. Once every couple years people get stuck on there for 24 hours. Would be nice to have water and soup in an extended 'stay' I can tell you that much. And since the pints can freeze I can stash a few in each vehicle for the winter as emergency supplies. I keep my laptop in the car usually so if I'm stuck like that I'll have some entertainment at least. Plus definitely need to stash some good stuff at work, at least I can throw it in my bag on my way out the door in an emergency.
     

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