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Random Pictures thread !

Discussion in 'Topical Discussions (In Depth)' started by GOLDZILLA, Apr 4, 2010.



  1. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Wonderful Color Photos of Stockholm From Between the 1930s and 1960s


    In the late 20th century, Stockholm became a modern, technologically advanced and ethnically diverse city. Throughout the century, many industries shifted away from work-intensive activities into more high-technology and service-industry knowledge-based areas.

    The city continued to expand and new districts were created, some with high proportions of immigrants. Meanwhile, the inner city (Norrmalm) went through a criticised as well as admired wave of modernisation in the post-war period, the Redevelopment of Norrmalm, securing the city's geographical center as the political and business center for the future.

    In 1923 the Stockholm municipal government moved to a new building, the Stockholm City Hall. The Stockholm International Exhibition was held in 1930. In 1967 the city of Stockholm was integrated into Stockholm County.

    Below is a small collection of 22 wonderful color photographs of Stockholm from between the 1930s and 1960s.

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    http://www.vintag.es/2013/01/wonderful-color-photos-of-stockholm.html
     
  2. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    RNLB THOMAS KIRK WRIGHT
     
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  3. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    JAVAZEE - Built in 1967 by N.V. Scheepswerf & Machinefabriek De Merwede at Hardinxveld. Stationed at Breskens (1967-1990) and Hook of Holland (1991-2006). Now preserved and owned by the national rescue museum at Den Helder.
     
  4. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Dutch lifeboat ARTHUR, built 1940 by Nic. Witsen, Alkmaar (The Netherlands). She was stationed at Scheveningen till 1957, then temporarily at IJmuiden and Terschelling, as from 1959 back in Scheveningen and finally at Hindeloopen. In total she was involved in 345 operations, with 487 rescued people. postcard (Photographer Cees van der Meulen)
     
  5. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Dutch lifeboat INSULINDE, built 1927 at Delfzijl. She did 341 operations and rescued 332 people. She was stationed at Oostmahorn in the province Friesland. Withdrawn in 1965, but acquired by the National Rescue Museum at Den Helder in 2005 and preserved.
    postcard (Photographer Cees van der Meulen)
     
  6. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    German lifeboat BREMEN. Originally built in 1931, but completely rebuilt in 1953 by Fr.-Luerssen-Werft, Bremen-Vegesack. Length 17.5 m, width 4.2 m. Schiffsfotos Jansen, Hamburg
     
  7. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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  8. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Hartlepool Lifeboats with Crews
     
  9. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    US Life Saving Crew Leaving Station, Michigan City 1905
     
  10. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    15 Stunning Vintage Portrait Photos of Veterans of the Napoleonic Wars, 1858


    Napoléon Bonaparte's final defeat was the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. Even after his death in 1821, the surviving soldiers of Grande Armée revered his historic leadership. Each year on May 5, the anniversary of Napoléon's death, the veterans marched to Paris' Place Vendôme in full uniform to pay respects to their emperor.

    These fascinating portraits are believed to be the only surviving images of French veterans who fought in the Napoleonic Wars of 1803–1815 wearing the uniforms they fought in.

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    The photographs were taken on one of these occasions, possibly in 1858. All the men — at this time in their 70s and 80s — are wearing the Saint Helena medals, issued in August 1857 to all veterans of the wars of the revolution and the empire.

    The blurring on some of the pictures shows how hard the ageing subjects found it to stand still for several seconds while the plates were exposed.

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    Monsieur. Verlinde of the 2nd Lancers.

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    Monsieur Vitry of the Departmental Guard.

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    Monsieur Dupont who was fourier for the 1st Hussar.

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    Quartermaster Fabry of the 1st Hussars.

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    Monsieur Schmit of the 2nd Mounted Chasseur Regiment.

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    Grenadier Burg of the 24th Regiment of the Guard of 1815.

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    Monsieur Maire of the 7th Hussars circa 1809-1815.

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    Quartermaster Sergeant Delignon in the uniform of a Mounted Chasseur of the Guard.

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    Sergeant Taria in the uniform of the Grenadiere de la Garde of 1809-1815.

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    Monsieur Ducel, a Mameluke de la Garde.

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    Monsieur Loria of the 24th Mounted Chasseur Regiment and a Chevalier of the Legion of Honour, who appears to have lost his right eye.

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    Monsieur Mauban of the 8th Dragoon Regiment of 1815.

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    Monsieur Lefebre, a sergeant in the 2nd Regiment of Engineers in 1815.

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    Pictured in his grand hussar uniform is Monsieur Moret of the 2nd Regiment, 1814-1815.

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    Monsiuer Dreuse of the 2nd Light Horse Lancers of the Guard.

    (Images: Brown University Library)

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/12/15-stunning-vintage-portrait-photos-of.html
     
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  11. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Before They Were Big: 18 Surprising Pictures of World Leaders When They Were Young


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    These amazing pictures of world leaders when they were young are sure to bring back some memories for all of us that were watching TV at that time and possibly saw one of these unknown people that later became living legends.

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    Barack Obama smoking a joint.

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    Eighteen year old Princess Elizabeth of England during her time in the Auxiliary Territorial Service during WWII where she drove and repaired heavy vehicles, 1945.

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    Portrait of John F. Kennedy at age 10, hair slicked back, 1927.

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    A thin Hugo Chavez in military academy.

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    Kim Jong-il with his father, Kim Il-sung, and his mother, Kim Jong-suk in 1945.

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    Joseph Stalin as a young man, 1902.

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    Richard Nixon is shown as a member of the Whittier College football squad in Whittier, Calif., circa 1930s.

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    Putin as a young teenager, 1966.

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    A young Shinzo Abe, Japan's Prime Minister (bottom left) pictured with his family in 1956.

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    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in 1972, shaking hands with President Zalman Shazar during his time in the Israeli Defense Forces.

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    Iranian President Hassan Rouhani in the early 1970s while doing military service.

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    Mugshot of Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff in 1970 when she was part of the guerrilla movement that fought against the country's military dictatorship.

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    Young Bill Clinton shacking hands with President John F. Kennedy in the Rose Garden of the White House. July 24, 1963.

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    George W. Bush in baseball garb at Yale University, ca. 1964-68.

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    Nelson Mandela in 1961.

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    Karol Wojtyla, before he was Pope John Paul II, has a shave in 1960.

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    Pope Francis as a young boy.

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    Portrait of Fidel Castro in New York in 1955, during an interview.

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    King Salman of Saudi Arabia at 19, in 1954.

    http://www.vintag.es/2015/09/before-they-were-big-18-surprising.html
     
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  12. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    It Hurts To Be Beautiful! Here Are 10 Terrifying Beauty Gadgets From The Past


    It’s easy to think that modern culture is more image-obsessed than we’ve ever been, but that’s just not the case. Women have been subjecting themselves to all kinds of bizarre beauty treatments for as long as civilization has existed. In this feature, we’ll share 10 of the weirdest beauty rituals that women have turned to through history.

    1. Nose Harness

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    “You have a beautiful face… But your nose?” If you were alive in the early 20th century and you didn’t like your nose, the good news is that you didn’t have to resort to expensive, painful rhinoplasty. The bad news is that your other option involved this painful-looking and unsightly Trados Nose-Shaper. Model 22 was pretty popular in 1918, if the number of ads is any indication, but “Face Specialist” M. Trilety didn’t stop there. By 1928, Trilety was a “Pioneering Noseshaping Specialist” who offered quick, painless and permanent nose correction with Model 25.

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    2. Dimple Stamper

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    Isabella Gilbert must have spent a significant portion of her life distressed over her lack of dimples, because in 1936 she invented this spring-loaded contraption that promised to “make a fine set” by pressing a pair of knobs into the cheeks. This seems like a commitment you would have to take seriously, since real dimples don’t just show up for a night out on the town.


    3. Dr. Lecter’s Mask

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    Anyone with “facial defects” in 1912 was fortunate to have Lillian Bender, who invented this super-comfy device which promised “removal of wrinkles and sagging flesh” by way of a fully adjustable rubber mask. Bender thoughtfully included an opening for the mouth, which was probably helpful since the elastic collar was tied corset-style around the throat.


    4. Vibrators. Vibrators Everywhere.

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    Targeted vibration worked so well for hysteria that it was soon prescribed for curing everything from cellulite to cankles.

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    In 1910, the White Cross Electric Vibrator was advertised as a combination hip slimmer, dandruff buster and cure for “back lameness.” In the 1920s, its successor took the claims one step further and promised that the Venus-Adonis Electric Normalizer would do all that and improve “elimination.”

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    By 1950 the Electric Spot-Reducer offered a 10-day guarantee that the user would lose pounds and inches “without risking health,” which is at least half true.

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    Following soon after, a “multiple electric vibrator” for the scalp hit the market, promising to stimulate circulation in the “scalp and brain cells” in addition to removing dandruff and loose hair. The 480 vibrating pins were euphemistically called “artificial fingers,” probably because they look sort of terrifying.


    6. Self-Service Chin Straps

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    Problematic double chin got you down? Cheer up: Ads for the Professor Mack’s Chin Reducer and Beautifier from the 1890s say the device can eliminate and efface double chins, all while reducing “enlarged glands,” assuming you pull the cords hard enough.


    7. Asphyxia Hoods

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    If your skin lacked that youthful glow sometime in the 1940s, the best available solution was to sit a spell under the Glamour Bonnet. The vacuum helmet reduced “atmospheric pressure around the beauty seeker’s head,” which inventor Mrs. D. M. Ackerman believed would help stimulate circulation and improve the complexion. And while a vacuum hose stole all of your oxygen, you could read through the handy plastic window.

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    8. Magnetic Binding

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    You’d be hard-pressed to find someone who can tell you how magnets work, but one thing is for certain: they can cure just about anything. OK, it’s not true, but no one mentioned that to Thomson, Langdon & Co., manufacturers of the Wilsonia Magnetic Corset, which advertised itself as both a remedy for indigestion, paralysis and nervousness and the key to a teensy tiny waist.


    9. Miracle-Gro for Hair

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    Women weren’t the only ones to benefit from high-tech beauty aids in the early 1900s. A slew of baldness-reversing devices flooded the market, all promising improved hair growth and slower hair loss. One such instrument was Merke Institutes’ Thermocap, which was meant to stimulate dormant hair with heat and blue lights.

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    Taking that approach one step further, the hair and scalp device shown here stimulated the scalp by sending an arc of sparks from the blown glass attachments to the head. Seems legit.


    10. Pinpointed Flaw Detection

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    No collection of crazy-looking beauty contraptions would be complete without a nod to Maksymilian Faktorowicz, purveyor of fine cosmetics since he opened up shop as Max Factor in 1909. In addition to his excellent lipstick and eyeliners, Factor is also famous for developing the Beauty Micrometer in 1932, an instrument designed to detect a woman’s facial flaws so they can be corrected with makeup “by an experienced operator” before filming. The ad describes it as looking like a baseball mask, but that’s only because Hellraiser hadn’t been filmed yet.

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    (via CVLT Nation)

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/04/it-hurts-to-be-beautiful-here-are-10.html
     
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  13. gnome

    gnome Platinum Bling Platinum Bling

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    Surprised at that pic, that Welly looked like a pretty busy port city for those times.
    A look at Welly today, doesn't seem to have grown all that much.

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  14. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Old West Saloons, Where Real Cowboys Often Gathered in the 19th and Early 20th Centuries


    In the American Old West, a saloon designates a café or hotel. The first was established in 1822 at Brown's Hole, Wyoming, between Colorado and Utah, to serve trappers during the harsh fur season. The popularity of these establishments is attested by the fact that even a city of 3,000 inhabitants, such as Livingston (Montana), recorded up to 33 saloons in 1883.

    Who goes to the saloon? Cowboys to negotiate cattle, drink alcohol, play poker... There are trappers, travelers, gold diggers, soldiers, lawyers, railwaymen ... The myth of the smoky saloon was born. Many saloons welcome their clients 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. They are often accused of being propitious to scenes of "general fights", or pistol duels that end in shootings in the street or public hangings.

    Take a look at these rare photos to see what real cowboys at saloons looked like in the 19th and early years of 20th centuries.

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    http://www.vintag.es/2017/04/old-west-saloons-where-real-cowboys.html
     
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  15. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Portrait Photos of White Wolf aka Chief John Smith, the Oldest Native American to Have Ever Lived


    At the ripe age of 137, White Wolf a.k.a. Chief John Smith is considered the oldest Native American to have ever lived, 1785-1922. When asked the secret to good health, Chief Smith responded "I never fly United Airlines."

    The Minneapolis Morning Tribune obituary says Ga-Be-Nah-Gewn-Wonce (variously known as Kay-bah-nung-we-way, Sloughing Flesh, Wrinkled Meat or plain old — well, really old — John Smith) was reputed to be 137 years old when he died. Whatever his precise age, his well-lined face indicates a man who led a long and full life.

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    According to Wikipeida, the exact age of John Smith at the time of his death has been a subject of controversy. Federal Commissioner of Indian Enrollment Ransom J. Powell argued that "it was disease and not age that made him look the way he did" and remarked that according to records he was only 88 years old.

    Paul Buffalo who, when a small boy, had met John Smith, said he had repeatedly heard the old man state that he was "seven or eight", "eight or nine" and "ten years old" when the "stars fell".

    The stars falling refers to the Leonid meteor shower of November 13, 1833, about which local historian Carl Zapffe writes: "Birthdates of Indians of the 19th Century had generally been determined by the Government in relation to the awe-inspiring shower of meteorites that burned through the American skies just before dawn on 13 November 1833, scaring the daylights out of civilized and uncivilized peoples alike. Obviously it was the end of the world...". This puts the age of John Smith at just under 100 years old at the time of his death.

    Up to four years ago of his last days he had never visited a big city. His first trip of this kind was to the Twin Cities. Later he visited the Automobile show at Chicago.

    A year and a half ago before dying he returned to the north woods of Minnesota to spend his time fishing for sturgeon in Lake of the Woods, in the same waters that he fished more than a century ago.

    Ga-Be-Nah-Gewn-Wonce had been married eight times. He had no children and the only survivor is Tom Smith, an adopted son at whose home he died.

    The “old Indian,” as he was generally known among the white people, was active until six months ago, since which time he had not been seen outside his adopted son’s house. Before that time he had made it a practice to meet all trains entering the village and offer postal cards for sale.

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    http://www.vintag.es/2017/08/portrait-photos-of-white-wolf-aka-chief.html
     
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  16. gnome

    gnome Platinum Bling Platinum Bling

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    I've always liked the traditional Chippewa/Ojibway plant patterns.


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  17. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Modal Operator/Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    Jimmie Durante's father?

    Dat's my Shnoz!

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  18. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Back Then, Traveling Was Friendlier: 19 Interesting Vintage Photos That Show How Glamorous Train Travel Used To Be


    Traveling by train was pretty swanky from the 1930s to the 1960s, and it hasn't gone out of style. First class cabins were furnished like living rooms and included radio gramophones. Passengers dined on fine china and played cards to pass the time.

    Here's what train travel looked like in the good old days.

    1. People used to dress up for train travel.

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    Passengers waiting with their luggage to board the first special passenger train to London. (Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

    2. No sweats or hoodies here.

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    Employees of Messrs Carreras peer out of their railway carriage window prior to departure from Charing Cross Station, London, in 1934. (E. Dean/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

    3. Traveling was an event.

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    Employees of Messrs Carreras waving from the platform prior to departure from Charing Cross Station, London, in 1935. (E. Dean/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

    4. Railway carriages were spacious and well-lit.

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    The interior of a carriage circa 1934. (Photo by Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    5. First class cars in particular were tastefully decorated.

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    Cleaners at work in the luxurious coach 'Minerva' in 1938. (Fox Photos/Getty Images)

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    The luxurious first class lounge on board a London Midland and Scottish Royal Scot train. (Edward G Malindine/Getty Images)

    7. This first class car evokes the ancient Momoyama style of Japanese art.

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    A luxurious Japanese Railway Department observation car circa 1920. (Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    8. Celebrities enjoyed the comforts of first class. Some things never change.

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    Paul McCartney of the Beatles and Mick Jagger of the Rolling Stones sit opposite each other on a train at Euston Station in 1967. (Victor Blackman/Express/Getty Images)

    9. Restaurant cars hosted guests with elegant table settings.

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    A new British Railways restaurant car at Waterloo Station in London in 1949. (Topical Press Agency/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

    10. Passengers dined on fine china.

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    Passengers in a first class dining saloon in 1951. (Photo by Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

    11. Some trains offered food buffet style.

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    A corridor buffet car built for the new electric main line from London to Bognor Regis, Chichester and Littlehampton districts on show at Waterloo station, London, in 1938. (J. A. Hampton/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

    12. Others employed dapper servers to pour drinks.

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    Diners in the restaurant car on a GWR (Great Western Railway) oil-fired locomotive, in 1946. (Harrison /Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

    13. In cars equipped with radio gramophones, passengers could enjoy music and radio programs.

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    Passengers listen to a radio gramophone on a LNER train carriage in 1930. (Photo by Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    14. Playing cards was also a popular pastime.

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    Passengers in a BEA Vickers Viking while away the time with a game of cards in 1947. (Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    15. As was reading the newspaper.

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    September 1930: Passengers listen to the wireless on board a train on the Canadian Pacific Railway. (Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    16. Traveling back then still involved the same crowded rush as it does now.

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    Holidaymakers waiting for the Cornish Riviera express train at Paddington Station, London, in 1924. (E. Bacon/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

    17. But there was also a special kind of thrill to riding on the railroad that's hard to come by these days.

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    Milkmen from United Dairies on one of the LNER trains chartered at King's Cross Station, London, in 1932. (J. A. Hampton/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

    18. Back then, traveling was friendlier.

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    An transport official at Euston Station, London, gives directions to a little girl leaving on a hiking expedition. 7th April 1939. (Photo by William Vanderson/Fox Photos/Getty Images)

    19. And more romantic.

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    A kiss under the mistletoe in a first class railway carriage before leaving Paddington Station, London, in 1936. (David Savill/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

    (via Business Insider)

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/07/19-interesting-vintage-photos-that-show.html
     
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  19. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Vintage Photographs of the Incredible Railroad Bridges With Timber Trestles From the 19th and Early 20th Centuries


    In the 1830s, the railroad boom started a new era in the building of railroad bridges pushing engineers to build towering wooden bridges that have become synonymous with the era.

    Timber trestles were one of the few railroad bridge forms that did not develop in Europe. The reason was that in the United States and Canada cheap lumber was widespread and readily available in nearby forests. The Pacific Northwest of the U.S. and the province of British Columbia, Canada became the central region for hundreds of logging railroads whose bridges were almost all made of timber Howe trusses and trestles.

    Timber trestles generally come in two forms. The first and most common is the pile trestle which consists of bents spaced 12 to 16 feet apart. Each bent consists of 3 to 5 round timber poles that are pounded straight into the ground by a pile driver. The centre post is upright, the two inner posts are angles at about 5 degrees and the outside posts are usually battered, angling outward for stability at about ten degrees. During construction, the top of the uneven posts are cut to the proper level for a cap which in turn supports the stringers and planks that hold the rail. Taller pile trestles contain diagonal "X" bracing across one or both sides of the bent and also between bents.

    For higher timber trestles, the framed bent is used. Unlike pile bents, frame bents usually use square timbers and rest on mud sills or sub sills that act as a foundation. Frame bents are built in a series of "stories" that are usually between 10 and 50 feet high. For extremely high trestles, each section of the bent is built flat on the ground as a single or double story and then lifted and placed onto the ever lengthening trestle.

    None of the dozen or so highest timber bridges of all time exist anymore. Nearly half of these 200 foot high monsters were built for logging railroads in the U.S. state of Washington and on Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. For the lumber industry, rail lines were usually little more than a web of dead end tracks blanketed across the contour lines of a forested mountainside. Once the terrain was logged out, the tracks were abandoned. Since lumber was easy to find and abundant, it could quickly be cut on-site into tall piles or bents. With nothing built to last, construction standards were often low. Expensive bridges, especially those made of steel, were avoided by the loggers.

    Early timber bridges had their drawbacks. Untreated lumber only lasted about 20 years and locomotives could easily cause the wood to catch fire. Collapses - rare today - were a regular Trestle bridgeoccurrence on logging railroads and there are numerous accounts of train crews that regularly hopped off their slow moving locomotive as it approached a high, untrustworthy trestle, allowing it to cross before they would then run across the bridge and jump back on. On main lines that carried passengers and freight, tall timber bridges reduced efficiency as trains had to cross them at slower speeds. Trestle bridgeInitially they were a quick way to get the route open but once established, the owners usually had them replaced with steel bridges or filled.

    Without trestles to bridge the "gaps" the logging companies would have had a hard time. Trestles, in more ways than one carried the logging industry. Look at these pictures of these incredible trestles from the 19th century.

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    Log bridge (crib trestle) on the Columbia and Nehalem Valley Railroad, Columbia County, Oregon.

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    Crib trestle bridge of the Columbia& Nehalem Valley Railroad at the McBride Creek, circa 1905.

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    Montana's massive 214 foot high Two Medicine Creek timber trestle on the Great Northern Railway.

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    A home-made log bridge. The men sitting atop it give an idea of its height, and the diameter of the redwood logs used for construction.

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    A 203-foot high wall of wood — the Cedar River Logging Trestle in Washington State.

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    A timber trestle over the Crooked River Gorge in central Oregon sits nearly 320 feet off of the water.

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    Trestle in Central Pacific Railroad, circa 1869.

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    A spectacular avalanche , Feb 10, 1903 swept away part of a trestle 300 feet high that let northern pacific railway trains descend from this pass since 1890.

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    Trestle and logging railroad at Robinson's camp, Clallam County, Washington.

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    The engine "Firefly" on a trestle of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, circa 1864.

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    The Dale Creek Bridge, 2 miles west of Sherman, Wyoming.

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    Trestle construction

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    Erie – Constructing Trestle over B&S Railroad.

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    Erie trestle construction

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    Myra Canyon Trestle Bridge near Kelowna, British Columbia. Constructed by Kettle Valley Railway.

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    The Myra Canyon trestles - located near the city of Kelowna, British Columbia - were constructed by the Kettle Valley Railway ("KVR"), a subsidiary of the Canadian Pacific Railway, as part of a secondary main line route that operated across southern British Columbia.

    (via Atchuup!)

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/10/vintage-photographs-of-incredible.html
     
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  20. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    26 Rare and Amazing Vintage Photographs Captured Street Scenes of New York City in the 1890s


    The prospect of employment in a rapidly expanding industrial economy brought millions of immigrants from Europe, Asia, and Latin America to the brink of America in the period 1891 to 1930. This was also a period of intense social, economic, and political anxiety in the United States. Growing social and economic pressures posed by industrialization, sprawling urban cities, violent labor uprisings, economic depression, fears of middle-class "race suicide," the changing structure of American authority, and a fractured sense of American unity all fueled growing nativist sentiment in the United States.

    The nation was gripped in the beginnings of an effort to contain a growing sense of disorder, a sense that immigrants, garbage, unionism, corruption, and vice were all exceeding the bounds of their containment and that those bounds must be reestablished. In New York City, in 1890, Jacob Riis published How the Other Half Lives-a photo documentary of ghetto conditions that would have national impact. The following year, Josiah Strong pointed out that "a mighty emergency is upon us."

    Here is an amazing collection of rare vintage photos capturing street scenes in New York City during the 1890s.

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    The Bowery, New York Times, 1896

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    Union Square in 1893

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    The Harlem River Speedway and High Bridge in 1898

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    Tony Pastor's 14th Street Theatre, 1895

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    Union Square West and 17th Street, September 25, 1891

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    Wall Street in 1898

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    Westchester Avenue, The Bronx, 1895

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    Billboards in Times Square, ca. 1890s

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    Billboards on 42nd Street at Broadway, Times Square, 1898

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    Bowling Green Park in 1896

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    Broadway and 23rd Street (before the Flatiron Building), 1899

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    Brooklyn Bridge (from the Manhattan side), 1894

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    Construction at Columbus Circle, 1895

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    Cutting ice in the Bronx, ca. late 1890s

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    Duane Street in 1891

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    Fifth Avenue and 59th Street, 1899

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    Girls settling with the cabby, 1895

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    Greeley Square in 1898

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    Herald Square, 6th Avenue, Broadway, and 35th Street, NYC, 1898

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    High Bridge, from Washington Heights with The Bronx to the left, 1892

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    New York City El on The Bowery, 1895

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    New York in winter, 1895

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    On Westchester Avenue, the Bronx, 1898

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    Policeman on a New York street, 1896

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    Steeplechase Park, Coney Island, Brooklyn, 1899

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    Surf Avenue, Coney Island, 1896

    http://www.vintag.es/2016/12/26-rare-vintage-photos-captured-nyc.html
     
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  21. Goldhedge

    Goldhedge Modal Operator/Moderator Site Mgr Site Supporter

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    Screen Shot 2017-10-07 at 10.11.39 PM.png
     
  22. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Groovy Chicks on Vintage Motorbike Ads: 26 Fascinating Scooter and Motorcycle Adverts from the 1960s


    Before ‘political correctness’ was ever invented, the motorcycle industry loved to target males (sorry ladies) using some good old fashioned ‘sex sells’ tactics. They’d usually do it with headlines filled with sexual innuendo and many, many beautifully seductive women. Women that stared you in the eye and said “Purchase this fine motorbike and you will find yourself swimming in a ocean of pre-feminist, lose-moraled women in see-through clothing without any buttons.”

    Here’s a collection of magazine ads from the 1960s and a few from the early ’70s that pay homage to those golden days of advertising. Enjoy...

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    (via Flashbak)

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/03/groovy-chicks-on-vintage-motorbike-ads.html
     
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  23. Alton

    Alton Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Motorcycle seats were responsible for the drop in vibrator sales.
     
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  24. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Rare Photographs of Revolutionary Veterans Who Lived Long Enough to Have Their Pictures Taken


    Images of Americans who fought in the Revolution are exceptionally rare because few of the Patriots of 1775-'83 lived until the dawn of practical photography in the early 1840s; far fewer were daguerreotyped; many, probably most, of such daguerreotypes never carried identification; and finally, the ravages of time have claimed the vast majority of portraits from the 1840s and ‘50s.

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    Accordint to PetaPixel, in 1864, 81 years after the war, Reverend E. B. Hillard and two photographers embarked on a trip through New England to visit, photograph, and interview the six known surviving veterans, all of whom were over 100 years old. The glass plate photos were printed into a book titled The Last Men of the Revolution.

    In 1976, an investigative reporter named Joe Bauman came across Hillard’s photos. Realizing that more photos may have been captured of other veterans in the 40-50 year gap between when photography was invented and when Hillard’s images were made, Bauman set out to find them.

    After finding photos of subjects that were about the right age, Bauman dug into their histories to see if they had been involved in the Revolution. In the end, the journalist spent three decades building what is now considered the biggest collection of daguerreotypes showing veterans of the Revolutionary War — a set of eight portraits.

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    Peter Mackintosh, daguerreotype. Peter Mackintosh was a 16-year-old apprentice blacksmith in Boston working in the shop of his master, Richard Gridley, the night of December 16, 1773 when a group of young men rushed into the shop, grabbed ashes from the hearth and rubbed them on their faces. They were among those running to Griffin’s Wharf to throw tea into the harbor as part of the Boston Tea Party that started the Revolution. Mackintosh later served in the Continental Artillery as an artificer, a craftsman attached to the army who shoed horses and repaired cannons, including one mortar whose repair General George Washington oversaw personally. During his last years, Mackintosh and his lawyers fought for the pension he deserved. The government awarded it to his family only after his death, which was on November 23, 1846 at age 89. (Courtesy of Joseph Bauman)

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    Simeon Hicks, daguerreotype. Simeon Hicks was a Minuteman from Rehoboth, Massachusetts who drilled every Saturday in the year leading up to the war. When he heard the alarm the day after the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the sparks that set off the Revolution, he immediately joined thousands of other New Englanders in sealing off the enemy garrison in Boston. He served several short enlistments and fought in the Battle of Bennington, August 16, 1777. After the war Hicks lived in Sunderland, Vermont as a celebrity. He was the last survivor of the Battle of Bennington. (Courtesy of Joseph Bauman)

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    Jonathan Smith, daguerreotype. Jonathan Smith fought in the Battle of Long Island on August 29, 1778. His unit was the first brigade that went out on Long Island, and was discharged in December after a violent snow storm. After the war he became a Baptist minister. He was married three times and had eleven children. The first two wives died and for some reason he left his third wife in Rhode Island to live with two of the children in Massachusetts. On October 20, 1854, he had a daguerreotype taken to give to a granddaughter. He died on January 3, 1855. (Courtesy of Joseph Bauman)

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    George Fishley, daguerreotype. George Fishley was a soldier in the Continental army. When the British army evacuated Philadelphia and raced toward New York City, his unit participated in the Battle of Monmouth. Later he was part the genocidal attack on Indians who had sided with the British, a march led by General John Sullivan through “Indian country,” parts of New York and Pennsylvania. Fishley’s regiment, the Third New Hampshire, was in the midst of the campaign’s only contested battle. After the Battle of Chemung, August 28, 1779, the Americans had devastated forty Indian towns and burned their crops. Later Fishley served on a privateer — a private ship licensed to prey on enemy shipping — and was captured by the British. Fishley was a famous character after the war in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, where he lived. He was known as “the last of our cocked hats” — Continental soldiers wore tall, wide, Napoleonic-looking headgear with cockades. He marched in parades wearing the hat, which his obituary said “almost vied in years with the wearer.” Fishley is wearing the hat in the daguerreotype. (Courtesy of Joseph Bauman)

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    James W. Head, daguerreotype. James W. Head, a Boston youth, joined the Continental Navy at age 13 and served as a midshipman aboard the frigate Queen of France. When Charleston, South Carolina, came under attack, five frigates, including the Queen of France, and several merchant ships were sunk in a channel to prevent the king’s troops from approaching the city from one strategic direction. Head and other sailors fought as artillerymen in forts and were captured when the Americans surrendered — the Patriots’ biggest and arguably most disastrous surrender of the war. Taken as a prisoner of war, Head was released at Providence, Rhode Island and walked home. His brother wrote that when he arrived, Head was deaf in one ear and had hearing loss in the other from the cannons’ concussion. Settling in a remote section of Massachusetts that later became Maine, he was elected a delegate to the Massachusetts convention in Boston that was called to ratify the Constitution. When he died he was the richest man in Warren, Maine and stone deaf because of his war injuries. (Courtesy of Joseph Bauman)

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    Rev. Levi Hayes, daguerreotype. Rev. Levi Hayes was a fifer in a Connecticut regiment that raced toward West Point to protect it from an impending attack. He also participated in a skirmish with enemy “Cow Boys” at the border of a lawless region called the Neutral Ground (most of Westchester County, New York, and the southwestern corner of Connecticut). In the early years of the nineteenth century, he helped organize a religiously-oriented land company that headed into the wilderness of what was then the West. They settled Granville, Ohio, where he was the township treasurer and a deacon of his church. His daguerreotype shows him holding a large book, most likely a Bible. (Courtesy of Joseph Bauman)

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    Daniel Spencer, daguerreotype. Daniel Spencer served as a member of the backup troops sent to cover the operatives in a secret mission to capture Benedict Arnold, after he had defected to the British. The maneuver failed when Arnold shifted his headquarters. A member of the elite Sheldon’s Dragoons, Spencer was in a few skirmishes. He sat up all night fanning his commanding officer, Captain George Hurlbut, who had been shot in a fight during which the British captured a supply ship. Spencer’s account of the death of the officer differed markedly from that of Gen. Washington's; Spencer said the wounds of the officer had nearly healed when he caught a disease from a prostitute and this illness killed him, whereas Washington said he died of his wounds. Spencer’s pension was revoked soon after it was granted and for years he and his family lived in severe poverty. Eventually his pension was restored. He was the guest of honor during New York City’s celebration of July 4, 1853. (Courtesy of Joseph Bauman)

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    Dr. Eneas Munson, daguerreotype. As a boy, Dr. Eneas Munson knew Nathan Hale, the heroic spy who was executed and said he regretted that he had only one life to give for his country. As a teenager, Munson helped care for the wounded of his hometown, New Haven, Connecticut, after the British invaded. He was commissioned as a surgeon’s mate when he was 16 years old, shortly before he graduated from Yale. He extracted bullets from soldiers during battle. In 1781 he was part of Gen. Washington’s great sweep to Yorktown, Virginia, which led to Gen. John Burgoyne’s surrender and American victory of the Revolution. During the fighting at Yorktown he was an eyewitness to actions of Gen. Washington, Gen. Knox, and Col. Alexander Hamilton. Dr. Munson gave up medicine after the war and became a wealthy businessman, fielding trading ships, underwriting whalers and sealers, and venturing into real estate and banking. But throughout his life, his family spoke of how he loved recalling the exciting days of the war, when he was a teenage officer. (Courtesy of Joseph Bauman)

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    Samuel Downing, CDV card photo. Samuel Downing enlisted at age 16, and served as a private from New Hampshire. At the time his picture was made, he as 102 and living in the town of Edinburgh, Saratoga Country, New York. He died on February 18, 1867. (N. A. and R. A. Moore, Courtesy of Joseph Bauman)

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    Rev. Daniel Waldo, CDV card photo. Rev. Daniel Waldo was drafted in 1778 for a month of service in New London. After that, he enlisted for an additional eight months, and in March 1779 was taken prisoner by the British at Horseneck. After he was released, he returned to his home in Windham and took up work on his farm again. (N. A. and R. A. Moore, Courtesy of Joseph Bauman)

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    Lemuel Cook, CDV card photo. Lemuel Cook witnessed the British surrender at Yorktown, the event that guaranteed American independence. Of the event, he said, “Washington ordered that there should be no laughing at the British; said it was bad enough to surrender without being insulted. The army came out with guns clubbed on their backs. They were paraded on a great smooth lot, and there they stacked their arms.” (N. A. and R. A. Moore, Courtesy of Joseph Bauman)

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    Alexander Milliner, CDV card photo. Alexander Milliner enlisted as a drummer boy who served in Gen. Washington’s Life Guard unit. He was a favorite of Washington’s, often playing at his personal request. Milliner was at the British surrender at Yorktown, about which he said, “The British soldiers looked down-hearted. When the order came to ‘ground arms,’ one of them exclaimed, with an oath, ‘You are not going to have my gun!’ and threw it violently on the ground, and smashed it.” (N. A. and R. A. Moore, Courtesy of Joseph Bauman)

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    William Hutchings, CDV card photo. William Hutchings enlisted at age 15 for the coastal defense of his home state, New York. Writes Hillard in The Last Men of the Revolution, “The only fighting which he saw was the siege of Castine, where he was taken prisoner; but the British, declaring it a shame to hold as prisoner one so young, promptly released him.” (N. A. and R. A. Moore, Courtesy of Joseph Bauman)

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/10/rare-photographs-of-revolutionary.html
     
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  25. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Rarely Seen Photographs From a Photo Session of The Beatles at the Beginning in 1961

    Black and white photographs of The Beatles, including Pete Best, taken by Albert Marrion on Sunday 17 December 1961. Marrion, a local Liverpool photographer, was hired by The Beatles’ new manager, Brian Epstein, to take a few photographs of the band.

    Albert Marrion actually tooks about thirty photographs… but discarded all but sixteen negatives because many showed Lennon and McCartney acting up and spoiling the pose.

    The first image served as the “master print” for the Beatles first autograph cards and their appearance on the front cover of Mersey Beat magazine, while you can find the last one used as cover sleeve for The Decca Tapes album, a bootleg from the audition the Beatles performed in Decca on 1 January 1962.

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    (via Beatles Archive)

    http://www.vintag.es/2015/10/rarely-seen-photo-session-of-beatles-in.html
     
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  26. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Kasparus Karsen A calm waterway
     
  27. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Helen Allingham Surrey cottage
     
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  28. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    William Louis Sonntag Autumn Morning on the Potomac
     
  29. searcher

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    Asher Brown Durand Sunday Morning
     
  30. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Louise Ingram Rayner John Knox’s House, Edinburgh
     
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  31. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Kasparus Karsen A fortified Monestry
     
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  32. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    An avenue of trees with a traveller on the path, other figures and a dog beyond, Haarlem School, mid-17th Century
     
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  33. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Adriaen van Nieulandt Tulips, roses, Turk’s cap lilies, columbines, carnations and other flowers in a ceramic vase, with tulips in a glass vase, on a wooden ledge, with a peacock butterfly, a grasshopper and a lizard, 1604
     
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    Justice League of America Vol 1 #6 - September, 1961
     
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    23 Amazing Vintage Photographs Taken Inside WWII Tank Factories


    The manufacturing of tanks was a particular priority, as the German army had by far outpaced its adversaries in this area. In the late 1930s, the U.S. Army was not using tanks in any combat capacity. There were no facilities in the United States to manufacture tanks—not even in small quantities. As late as 1939, the U.S. Army Ordnance Department awarded tank contracts to companies that manufactured railroad equipment, before determining that automotive concerns would be far more capable of the level of mass production that was needed.

    These images, taken by photographers working for the Automotive Council for War Production, capture some workers who were part of the effort to close the tank gap.

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    (Photos: Getty Images)

    http://www.vintag.es/2017/10/23-amazing-vintage-photographs-taken.html
     
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  36. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Giovanni Battista Boncori The Card Players
     
  37. searcher

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    Tom Lovell Target Practice
     
  38. searcher

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    Caravaggio The Supper at Emmaus, 1605-06
     
  39. searcher

    searcher Mother Lode Found Site Supporter ++ Mother Lode

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    Horatio Henry Couldery Exemplary behavior
     
  40. searcher

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    Sir Edwin Henry Landseer A Distinguished Member of the Humane Society
     

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