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Wood Stove for Heat

Discussion in 'Survival (Preps & Homestead)' started by .375, Sep 25, 2016.



  1. .375

    .375 Silver Member Silver Miner

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    I just bought a home. It is manufactured; built in 2000. It has a wood-burning fireplace that has never been used.

    I am thinking of getting an insert or wood-burning stove to help with heat. I live in Tennessee on about one acre.

    I have seen this one http://napoleonfireplaces.com/products/s1-wood-stove/

    I don't want it to be too bulky - like one designed to cook. I'm pretty sure my wife will not be interested in cooking in a wood stove - or filling our living room with one.

    I'm also wondering if I would have to do anything significant with the chimney if I added a stove, or if the existing one would likely be good.
     
  2. brosil

    brosil Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    I'd recommend getting it inspected by a wood stove company or someone very knowledgeable.
    My BIL heated his 2 story quite well off an insert. Make sure there's good air circulation.
     
    D-FENZ likes this.
  3. smooth

    smooth Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    If it were me, I would install a stainless liner. It will improve draft and make you about 5 times safer. If you have a liner you can buy a brush and clean your chimney your self without pulling the insert. Having a liner installed will probably run you about $1000. Worth it IMO
     
  4. Uglytruth

    Uglytruth Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    Why not coal?
     
  5. smooth

    smooth Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    .375 I just looked at your link and it is showing a free standing stove??? If you want and insert, look on craigslist or if you have a facebook account search local selling groups for a used insert.
     
  6. ttazzman

    ttazzman Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter

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    things to consider with wood heat..

    size of log you can put in it
    how to clean ashes out
    damper system
    how the stove reacts when power goes out
    multi-wall construction
    ease of maint.
    weight of steel
     
  7. D-FENZ

    D-FENZ Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter ++

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    Before you waste any time looking for an insert, make certain that the fireplace you have is suitable for a retrofit. If your fireplace is a pre-fab metal one with a double or triple wall chimney you can just about forget about it unless it has a large straight chimney that could accomodate an insulated liner. Since it is a manufactured home the odds are not in your favor. The existing metal chimneys for zero-clearance metal fireplaces do not work well for airtight, efficient woodburning stoves. It's just not possible to get the stack temperatures high enough to avoid excessive creosote buildup with them. And cleaning any insert / stove installation in a fireplace retrofit is always a big project.

    Probably the best thing you can do energy efficiency-wise with a fireplace is to not use it. And make damn sure the damper is always closed and seals properly when not in use. Those things waste an enormous amount of energy.

    I would second brosil's opinion to have someone that knows what they're doing to have a look at it.
     
  8. <SLV>

    <SLV> Gold Member Gold Chaser Site Supporter

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    I put an insert in our fireplace at the farm house in Colorado. I was very disappointed at how much heat it put off. The blower barely trickled air into the room. It was a high-end Vermont Castings insert.

    Personally, our Kitchen Queen wood cookstove makes me nervous. Someday I'm going to move the fire outside of the house and get a wood boiler. My plan is to put radiant heat in the basement floor and use it to heat the whole house.
     
  9. ttazzman

    ttazzman Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter

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    over the years growing up we used several wood stove inserts......far and away the best was "buck" stove brand....tripple wall...it heated a full 1200 sq/ft house and that was turned down ...

    wood boiler is the way to go if you can afford it
     
  10. .375

    .375 Silver Member Silver Miner

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    Thanks for the replies. I guess I'll have to have it looked at.
    D-FENZ, it it's the wrong kind of chimney does that mean I would have to put another hole in the roof or could the current one possibly be replaced?
     
  11. glockngold

    glockngold Gold Member Gold Chaser

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    If you posted some photos of the current "fireplace" & chimney, you could get better advice.
    Plenty of us here heat with wood.
     
  12. Agavegirl1

    Agavegirl1 Silver Miner Site Supporter ++ Platinum Bling

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    Similar deal here. My insurance company will not insure a wood burning Franklin type stove in my only weekend and holiday location for liability reasons. I have a propane fireplace downstairs on a switch they think is fine. For future purposes, I am thinking of purchasing a propane based "gas" fireplace but purchase the wood insert and have it all ready in the attic for future purposes. If the chimney is installed, how difficult is the wood conversion going to be
     
  13. ttazzman

    ttazzman Midas Member Midas Member Site Supporter

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    ....i couldnt get past the "store it in the attic" ......those stoves are HEAVY.....just saying :)

    conversion shouldnt be a issue at all as long as ...

    the stoves are of similar size both with adequate clearances
    the flue pipe is of a size and type required for both units

    basicly your just building a "alcove" either from masonry or std materials that the propane or wood stove unit just fits into ....each stove will have required minimum clearances from different materials.........a SS double or tripple wall pipe provides the best option for a flue depends on code and your application just make sure they will work for both stoves....

    if your thinking SHTF ...remember all insert type stoves require a blower fan

    i personally always advocate for doing a energy audit of sorts on your home and adding insulation etc....these items pay for themselves now and later....i have been known to counsel people that they could heat their home with a candle if they insulated it enough......just something to think about
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2016
    Merlin likes this.

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