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An “All-Out Blizzard” That Is “Unheard Of For October”

Scorpio

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#1
An “All-Out Blizzard” That Is “Unheard Of For October” Is About To Hit Farms In The Midwest With Up To 2 Feet Of Snow
Michael Snyder




Farmers in the middle of the country are about to get hit by what could potentially be the worst October blizzard in U.S. history. According to USA Today, “the massive size and intensity of this snowstorm is unheard of for October”. In other words, we have never seen anything like this in the month of October ever before. Such a storm would have been disastrous enough in a normal year, but this has definitely not been a normal year for Midwest farmers. As I detailed extensively in previous articles, endless rain and horrific flooding made planting season a complete and utter nightmare for many Midwest farmers this year. Millions of acres did not get planted at all, and planting was seriously delayed on tens of millions of other acres. As a result, corn, soybeans and other crops are simply not ready to be harvested in many parts of the Midwest, and now an unprecedented winter storm is barreling directly toward our heartland.


This is a very, very serious situation. Normally, most corn in the Dakotas and Minnesota is considered to be “mature” by now, but this year we are facing a completely different scenario.


According to the latest USDA Crop Progress Report, only 22 percent of the corn in North Dakota is considered to be “mature” at this point…


Many farmers continue to wait on the sidelines to get into the fields. With freezing temperatures, heavy snowfall, and high winds set to hit the northern Plains this week, the corn in North Dakota is only 22% mature vs. a 75% five-year average, according to Monday’s USDA Crop Progress Report.​
Also, South Dakota corn is rated 36% mature vs. an 80% five-year average. Minnesota farmers have a corn crop that is just 39% mature vs. an 83% five-year average.​

And now here comes an “all-out blizzard”.


In case you are wondering, I am not the one that put such an extreme label on this storm. In fact, Accuweather is specifically using that term to describe this historic storm…


An unusually far-reaching snowstorm for early October will stall, strengthen and evolve into an “all-out blizzard” over the Dakotas and then will send a blast of cold air across much of the Plains and Midwest.​
Heavy snow has already fallen on the northern Rockies and was progressing southeastward along with a charge of cold air. Snow and slippery travel were also being reported in parts of Washington state, including around Spokane where new daily snowfall record for Oct. 8 was set. Spokane International Airport recorded 3.3 inches of snow Tuesday, shattering the previous record for the day, which was a trace set in 1981.​

It is crazy that Spokane is already getting snow.


According to Yahoo News, that snowfall already makes this the “third-snowiest October” that the city has ever experienced…


Spokane, Washington, was one town that was hit particularly hard by the snow on Tuesday. A record-breaking 3.3 inches of snow fell, the first measurable snow in the month of October since 2001. It also made this month the third-snowiest October on record, following 3.9 inches in October of 1975 and 6.1 inches in October of 1957.​

Ultimately, a few inches of snow is not that big of a deal.


But once this storm reaches the middle of the country, it is going to dump up to 2 feet of snow on some of our most important agricultural areas…


A general 6-12 inches is forecast over much of the Dakotas. However, a large swath of 12-24 inches is likely with an AccuWeather Local StormMax™ of 30 inches likely from north-central North Dakota to central and northeastern North Dakota.​
Cities that could end up with 2 feet of snow include Bismarck, Jamestown and Devils Lake, North Dakota, as well as Mobridge, South Dakota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba.​

Needless to say, that much snow at this time of the year is going to be absolutely devastating for many farmers.


And we are being told that this coming storm actually has “two parts”. After the first part strikes, the second part is going to come rolling through on Friday and Saturday


The storm will have two parts, the first of which is targeting the northern and central Rockies and High Plains on Wednesday into Thursday. The second part will bring snow to the eastern and central portions of the Dakotas and western Minnesota by week’s end.​
“Near-blizzard to full-fledged blizzard conditions are possible across portions of central North Dakota Friday afternoon into Saturday morning,” the weather service in Bismarck said. “Expect high impacts and dangerous to impossible travel conditions.”​

I can’t even imagine how corn and soybean farmers are going to feel once their unharvested fields are buried under two feet of snow.


As I keep warning, weather patterns just continue to become more extreme, and many believe that what we have witnessed so far is just the beginning of our problems.


There is one more thing that I would like to mention before I wrap up this article.


Do you remember the “Perfect Storm” that we witnessed in the Atlantic Ocean back in 1991? Hollywood made a big movie about it, and that film ended up making more than 300 million dollars worldwide.


Well, according to Accuweather a very similar storm is now developing in roughly the same location…


Interestingly, around the same time in 1991, the “Perfect Storm” was in the making over the western Atlantic Ocean. There are some similarities to the pattern this week with a smaller storm taking shape and stalling just off the mid-Atlantic and New England coasts.​

I found this to be particularly interesting, because I wrote an article about “the perfect storm” that is about to hit America just a few days ago. If you missed it, you can find my article entitled “The Book Is About To Close On The Late Great United States Of America” right here.


We live in truly unprecedented times, and things are about to start getting really crazy out there.


So get prepared for “the perfect storm” while you still can, because time is quickly running out.







Michael Snyder is a nationally syndicated writer, media personality and political activist. He is publisher of The Most Important News and the author of four books including The Beginning Of The End and Living A Life That Really Matters.





http://www.silverbearcafe.com/private/10.19/blizzard.html
 

Thecrensh

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#6
Was this forecast in the Farmers Almanac?
Just watched a video of a drunken duck hunter jumping off the top of a mini-van into a snowbank that had to be at least 3 feet deep...it wasn't a drift it was just snow. If this much snow is falling early, then there's a chance that when it warms up, there's going to be more flooding up in the Northern tier and next year's crops may be in jeopardy as well.
 

the_shootist

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#7
Just watched a video of a drunken duck hunter jumping off the top of a mini-van into a snowbank that had to be at least 3 feet deep...it wasn't a drift it was just snow. If this much snow is falling early, then there's a chance that when it warms up, there's going to be more flooding up in the Northern tier and next year's crops may be in jeopardy as well.
We're screwed now.....that means less corn squeezin's for our automobiles! A great excuse to raise gas prices on top of produce prices
 

Bottom Feeder

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#8
As I keep warning, weather patterns just continue to become more extreme, and many believe that what we have witnessed so far is just the beginning of our problems.
Ah, but the Earth abides —
About 14,500 years ago as we began to move out of a cold glacial period and back into a warmer interglacial something mysterious happened. That warming suddenly stopped and we shifted back into a cold glacial climate in the northern half of the planet. In about 11,500 this pause ended and things very abruptly shifted back into the on-going warming phase.

Known as the Younger Dryas (YD), the event is thought to have resulted from a slowdown of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation in response to a sudden flood of Laurentide Ice Sheet meltwater that reached the Nordic Seas where freshening and freezing near sites of deep-water formation would have suppressed convection and caused the YD cooling by reducing the meridional overturning.

In other words, as the vast ice sheets on the North American continent melted and collected in vast lakes, there was a flood of this freshwater over a 700 year period into the Arctic and then on out into the Atlantic. This is what disrupted the “meridional overturning”, or to use the more familiar term, disrupted the gulf stream that had been transporting heat from the equator northwards.
Skeptical Science

Global warming — meh, mother Gaia will take care of them pesky humans and their bullshitt
 

keef

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#10
Was this forecast in the Farmers Almanac?
mine says October 10 - October 15 expect FARGO type conditions


1570890776031.png


"Hey Scorp, ole buddy? Can I interest ya in some TrueCoat?"
 

newmisty

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TomD

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#12
We could use some of that crap down here where it's still hard sticky summer. I'm tired of it, all September flirted with or exceeded 100 degrees with bottom of the ocean humidity levels. No rain in 7 weeks. Truly sucks.
 

newmisty

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#14
good grief Keefer,

cold as hell here with wind blowin' and snow/sleet coming down,
not even a nice snow, just frozen rain comin' down
I've often wondered when hell became synonymous with cold.
 

Scorpio

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#15
point to new............
edit add, I went and found that answer for you new!


one of my favorites from way back,


The Cremation of Sam McGee

By Robert W. Service

There are strange things done in the midnight sun
By the men who moil for gold;
The Arctic trails have their secret tales

That would make your blood run cold;
The Northern Lights have seen queer sights,

But the queerest they ever did see
Was that night on the marge of Lake Lebarge

I cremated Sam McGee.

Now Sam McGee was from Tennessee, where the cotton blooms and blows.
Why he left his home in the South to roam 'round the Pole, God only knows.
He was always cold, but the land of gold seemed to hold him like a spell;
Though he'd often say in his homely way that "he'd sooner live in hell."

On a Christmas Day we were mushing our way over the Dawson trail.
Talk of your cold! through the parka's fold it stabbed like a driven nail.
If our eyes we'd close, then the lashes froze till sometimes we couldn't see;
It wasn't much fun, but the only one to whimper was Sam McGee.

And that very night, as we lay packed tight in our robes beneath the snow,
And the dogs were fed, and the stars o'erhead were dancing heel and toe,
He turned to me, and "Cap," says he, "I'll cash in this trip, I guess;
And if I do, I'm asking that you won't refuse my last request."

Well, he seemed so low that I couldn't say no; then he says with a sort of moan:
"It's the cursèd cold, and it's got right hold till I'm chilled clean through to the bone.
Yet 'tain't being dead—it's my awful dread of the icy grave that pains;
So I want you to swear that, foul or fair, you'll cremate my last remains."

A pal's last need is a thing to heed, so I swore I would not fail;
And we started on at the streak of dawn; but God! he looked ghastly pale.
He crouched on the sleigh, and he raved all day of his home in Tennessee;
And before nightfall a corpse was all that was left of Sam McGee.

There wasn't a breath in that land of death, and I hurried, horror-driven,
With a corpse half hid that I couldn't get rid, because of a promise given;
It was lashed to the sleigh, and it seemed to say: "You may tax your brawn and brains,
But you promised true, and it's up to you to cremate those last remains."

Now a promise made is a debt unpaid, and the trail has its own stern code.
In the days to come, though my lips were dumb, in my heart how I cursed that load.
In the long, long night, by the lone firelight, while the huskies, round in a ring,
Howled out their woes to the homeless snows— O God! how I loathed the thing.

And every day that quiet clay seemed to heavy and heavier grow;
And on I went, though the dogs were spent and the grub was getting low;
The trail was bad, and I felt half mad, but I swore I would not give in;
And I'd often sing to the hateful thing, and it hearkened with a grin.

Till I came to the marge of Lake Lebarge, and a derelict there lay;
It was jammed in the ice, but I saw in a trice it was called the "Alice May."
And I looked at it, and I thought a bit, and I looked at my frozen chum;
Then "Here," said I, with a sudden cry, "is my cre-ma-tor-eum."

Some planks I tore from the cabin floor, and I lit the boiler fire;
Some coal I found that was lying around, and I heaped the fuel higher;
The flames just soared, and the furnace roared—such a blaze you seldom see;
And I burrowed a hole in the glowing coal, and I stuffed in Sam McGee.

Then I made a hike, for I didn't like to hear him sizzle so;
And the heavens scowled, and the huskies howled, and the wind began to blow.
It was icy cold, but the hot sweat rolled down my cheeks, and I don't know why;
And the greasy smoke in an inky cloak went streaking down the sky.

I do not know how long in the snow I wrestled with grisly fear;
But the stars came out and they danced about ere again I ventured near;
I was sick with dread, but I bravely said: "I'll just take a peep inside.
I guess he's cooked, and it's time I looked"; ... then the door I opened wide.

And there sat Sam, looking cool and calm, in the heart of the furnace roar;
And he wore a smile you could see a mile, and he said: "Please close that door.
It's fine in here, but I greatly fear you'll let in the cold and storm—
Since I left Plumtree, down in Tennessee, it's the first time I've been warm."

There are strange things done in the midnight sun
By the men who moil for gold;
The Arctic trails have their secret tales

That would make your blood run cold;
The Northern Lights have seen queer sights,

But the queerest they ever did see
Was that night on the marge of Lake Lebarge

I cremated Sam McGee.

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/45081/the-cremation-of-sam-mcgee
 

newmisty

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Scorpio

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#19
yeah keef, you are right on that for sure,

it takes a different mindset to settle in for a winter,

especially when you can get away from all of the light and sound pollution,
so few know the smell or the warmth that comes from a real fire,
after a day in the snow covered woods on a set of cross country ski's,
with your recently retrieved supper of ptarmigan simmering now on that same stove
 

keef

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I would never had left that spot if circumstance would have allowed. never. weather changed, spring came again and had to move with it.
 

Unca Walt

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Cold snap today. Juuuust below 80.

Lovely. Great lobstering weather.
 

Strawboss

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#22
I've often wondered when hell became synonymous with cold.
It happened at the same time that the Dems/Repubs switched sides...
 

Bottom Feeder

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#23
whatta about well diggers?
I thought there was somethin cold about them.
and witches, too!
 

newmisty

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