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Bartering And Horse Trading

pitw

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#41
You ain't got enough stuff if you know all you have. When you can go picking in your own yard and go WOOHOO over a find you didn't remember bringing home you are enjoying life. Picking the place to fall makes a huge difference from a roof.;)
 

ME Co.

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#42
Hi Agnut"case",
Glad your still around. Haystack said you still talk about that coin guy that took the ball and ran with it- thanks again for the idea. Now I need to come up with another plan, still playing with coins but not worth the effort. Got back into gold mining last few summers with mixed results, haven't got out this year yet too busy. Need to come up with a cold weather idea for winter.
To add to this thread right now I am sitting with my Grams on her deathbed, while she still had her faculties she/we were preparing for this end. Only thing not paid for now is her casket and she has just enough savings left for materials so that will be my next job, Grams is a simple woman and wouldn't want to be buried in something that cost more than most of her cars. 'Sides with this she will have paid for it all herself. Anyways another $$$ saving tip. HH all, Mark
 

agnut

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#43
You ain't got enough stuff if you know all you have. When you can go picking in your own yard and go WOOHOO over a find you didn't remember bringing home you are enjoying life. Picking the place to fall makes a huge difference from a roof.;)
Hi Pitw. I laughed at your last post; it is all too true. With the mountain of stuff I have and not being able to find something I need, I don’t know whether I’m braggin’ or complainin’.

Thanks for the photos of your Suzuki and the model T steering wheel and roof bows. There is someone who would be thrilled to find these items for a restoration he is doing. Maybe an ad in Hemmings News would work. Reminds me of when I had a 1929 Buick and a 1950 Packard; parts could only be found in the Hemmings.

We must be mindful that what we have for our own use or horse trading may well be a nonrenewable resource. By this I mean that once we sell or trade an item we may not be able to easily replace it. The other side of the coin is that the item or service we received is an improvement in our own situation. Most important is that we must have items of value in the first place.

Lately I have been looking at renewable resources. The first that comes to mind is trading our skills for items or work. I am a retired auto mechanic and have the skills and tools to repair a wide range of equipment. I can trade and still have the same or more skill for the next time. Ben Franklin said to put all your money into education; it’s the one thing they can’t take away from you.

Another renewable resource is farming which includes raising plants for sale to people who have a desire to, in small measure, have fruits, herbs and veggies rather than buy at the market. With increasing prices and future uncertainties I see a potential here. Plants grown from seeds require a container, water, dirt, a little fertilizer and little attention to get them to the point of sale. The containers are available at garage sales and sometimes at nurseries. We have about 40 rhubarb plants that we pulled in order to clear away for a parking lot and circular drive. We are trading a few but will plant most of them permanently for the future. A few years ago I planted an orchard; it is just beginning to produce and next year should be the beginning of getting enough fruit to make an impact on our food bill. It is said that the best time to plant a tree is today. Because every day that we delay is a day that we won’t receive the benefit in the future.

Actually, much of life is like that. The seeds we plant in our minds will grow through time and yield the fruits of our labor. I have so many “seed” projects that I am overwhelmed. Years ago I bought 5 VW diesel cars in need of restoration. I paid from $100 to $200 each. Most of them sit behind the barn, mute testimony of my foresight. But I am older now and have slowed down considerably; I didn‘t take that into account at the time. At least they can be sold as is or parted out for a profit. There is an old saying in the used car business, “You don’t make the profit when you sell the car, you make the profit when you buy the car. In other words, no matter how much you sell the car for, you won’t profit if you bought it for too much (and put too much labor and parts into it).

My next project is to finish the 1987 VW Scirocco which I have converted to a rebuilt diesel engine and a stretched out ratio 5 speed transmission. It should get about 65 MPG on the freeway. I thought I was the first to do this but talked with a parts man who has already done this to his Scirocco and is getting 65 MPG without the stretched out ratio transmission.

I am all too aware that with the world situation being what it is, I may not be able to sell it for what it is worth. Time is money and delaying here as I have for years may cost me dearly. My only solace is that I really don’t want to sell the car because I like it so much and will probably need it for its high MPG. Besides, I am a diesel fan and have a 12K Lister diesel generator, a diesel Ford backhoe, a Kubota diesel tractor and a Dodge Cummins diesel truck as well. I have another Scirocco yet to be converted but am not kidding myself in that I may not get it finished before TSHTF. Times are changing like I have never seen before and we all must be aware of this before taking on lengthy projects.

Still leveling the parking lot and circular drive, about 70 feet by 120 feet. I’ll be the first to admit that I don’t know what I’m doing but have a friend whose career is in all kinds of construction. He was over the other day with a laser leveling device; it was amazing. As the laser spun around he could place the receiving device on a measuring shaft and call out the relative elevations and what areas I needed to raise or lower. And because we can get a lot of winter rain we have to put in a drainage system at the same time. I think I bit off more that I can chew.

Behind all these stories are unwritten bartering and horse trading deals which have, in their own way, balanced others’ helping me. See the 1959 movie “The Mating Game” with Tony Randall and Debbie Reynolds and you’ll get the picture. Debbie’s father is an old school horse trader who has little use for money. Hilarious and a joy to watch.

The less I use fiat currency the better I feel. Fiat currency is actually kinda depressing; maybe that’s where depressions come from. Ya think ?

Best wishes,

Agnut

"The budget should be balanced, the Treasury should be refilled, public debt should be reduced, the arrogance of officialdom should be tempered and controlled, and the assistance to foreign lands should be curtailed lest Rome become bankrupt. People must again learn to work, instead of living on public assistance."
- Marcus Tullius Cicero (106 BC - 43 BC)
 

agnut

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#44
Hi Agnut"case",
Glad your still around. Haystack said you still talk about that coin guy that took the ball and ran with it- thanks again for the idea. Now I need to come up with another plan, still playing with coins but not worth the effort. Got back into gold mining last few summers with mixed results, haven't got out this year yet too busy. Need to come up with a cold weather idea for winter.
To add to this thread right now I am sitting with my Grams on her deathbed, while she still had her faculties she/we were preparing for this end. Only thing not paid for now is her casket and she has just enough savings left for materials so that will be my next job, Grams is a simple woman and wouldn't want to be buried in something that cost more than most of her cars. 'Sides with this she will have paid for it all herself. Anyways another $$$ saving tip. HH all, Mark
Hi Me Co. Still around kickin’ ass and takin’ names. Was that you who ended up with a huge load of 40% and 90% Kennedy halves ? If so, glad it helped. The only coin idea is from Ponce who got me into buying $100 bricks of nickels. As you probably know, the metal content of the nickel is worth about a nickel. So what is the big deal ? Well, if/when we have a new currency, the coinage is often tied to the new currency’s value which is multiples of the old currency’s value. The benefit here is that one would retain and possibly greatly benefit later. Remember that our coinage is US Treasury money and all the paper is Feral Reserve stuff. The nickels are not the thing to get into heavily unless you have too much money and don’t know what to do with it. Besides, it may be a bit more difficult to get any quantity these days. Ponce and I got ours years ago. It’s a can’t lose proposition but maybe a can’t gain proposition also. Only time will tell.

As for other moneymaking ideas I will have to think about it for a while……. Okay, I’m back.

A company that buys out estates. You could run an ad in the local paper and Craigslist. You could qualify the sellers on the phone before even going to the effort of traveling. You would need the money to buy on the spot as well as the truck/trailer to get the goods out of there asap since items bought have a way of disappearing. You would also need a place to store the items and display them for your own sale. Experienced buyers doing this estate buying not only know the collective value but also have buyers waiting for particular items. It is these connections that are so important in getting back your initial investment right away in order to buy the next deal which could happen the next day. Nothing like making a good deal and next comes along a GREAT deal and you don’t have the money to get it. I don’t know how many calls you would receive; it could be none or overwhelming. Watching the obituaries is a bit morbid but I’m sure some do it. When someone passes on, the family sometimes just wants everything out of the house so that they can sell it as soon as possible and they see the contents as being in the way of their goal. That’s where you come in. There is a steep learning curve here but if you are quick and resourceful you could do well.

Another potential could be having a company that buys defunct companies’ inventories and equipment. I know of one that specializes in used shelving; I have bought from them and got some good prices.

Another is specializing in used auto parts. I core brokered for Mercedes and BMW for a few years and did very well. Those deals are ended now with factory rebuild programs but there is probably demand for all kinds of independent rebuilders such as starters, alternators, engines, transmissions, carburetors, injection pumps and others. Some body parts can be quite valuable, I once got a Porsche speedometer and clock for practically nothing in a package deal. I had them laying around for a few years and then decided to look on eBay to find their value. Turns out that they were from a Porsche Carrera and highly sought after. I sold them for $150 and $125.

Another is buying lots of an item and selling them on eBay. I have heard of a guy who makes $8,000 per week selling many small items. But imagine the logistics of that and you might want to start small and test the waters first.

There are many other opportunities; more than you or I can imagine. I tend to think of the worst case scenario when looking at an opportunity and work back from there. What is the most I can lose if everything goes tits up ? That is a part of the typical Millionaire Next Door thinking. And sometimes there is only blue sky and smooth sailing ahead. Ya gotta think it through unemotionally, it’s a business transaction, nothing more.

Best wishes in all your dealings,

Agnut

P.S. Sorry to hear about your grams; I’ve been through similar losses several times and it doesn’t get easier. It isn’t supposed to; each loved one is unique and deserves a specific sense of loss reserved only for them.
 

searcher

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#45
[h=1]7 Ways to Spend Less on Clothes[/h]Aug 13 2014

Frugality is undoubtedly a major part of wealth creation. Most people don’t get rich giving all their money away. And when it comes down to it, it takes much more than a dollar’s worth of effort in order to buy a dollar’s worth of goods. What does that mean? Let’s say you live in an area with a 10% sales tax and you are in a 40% marginal tax bracket. To buy a good priced at $1.00, you require $1.10. To have $1.10 you need to earn $1.83. Add some generous rounding and one could easily say that $1 worth of consumption requires $2 worth of work. Sounds like a bum deal to me.

So one of the easiest ways to build wealth is to spend less. Not only does it make a lot of sense from a financial point of view, it is also one of the most controllable aspects of wealth creation. Your income and investment returns are unpredictable. Your spending is predictable almost down to the dollar (if you’re disciplined).

So how does one spend less without dressing like you just slept in the back of a truck?

First of all, don’t get sucked in by the brands. Do you really need Gucci shoes and a Prada purse? Do you really need a Rolex ‘timepiece’ and a Hugo Boss suit? Frankly, staying away from the high-end brands is the easy decision. What becomes more challenging is avoiding the mid-level brands like Coach, Banana Republic or GAP, which still charge fairly high prices. The difficulty escaping these mid-tier brands is that it is difficult to find quality substitutes at lower prices.

Style is easily bought at high and mid-tier stores. But it is elusive once you start hitting Target. Here are some tips:


1. If you must buy something at a mid-tier store like Banana Republic or GAP, hold out for sales. Just because you see something you like, you don’t have to buy it right away. In fact, these days it seems like stores have sales more than they don’t. I feel like a sucker paying full retail price for anything now. I honestly believe you should pay at most 80% of the sticker price for anything. Right now I’m wearing a pair of black chukka boots from Browns, which I recently bought for $59. Regularly these would go for about $150.

2. Buy your basics at discount stores like Target or Wal-Mart. I can buy 3 white t-shirts at Wal-Mart for $6. Similar story for underwear, socks, khakis and basic canvas shoes.

3. Find the discount retailers focused on ‘disposable fashion’. Use these stores for buying more trendy items – which incidentally might only be hot for a year. Forever 21 and Joe Fresh (Canada) come to mind. Just don’t be a slave to trends. Clothes don’t need gimmicks to make them good.

4. If you’re comfortable wearing gently used clothes, find your local ‘swap and sell’ groups and stores. There are Facebook groups dedicated to this.

5. Buy clothes that are easily paired with other clothes. For example, plain white or blue dress shirts can be worn with any pants. Stick to these basics and you won’t need a special piece for every outfit you own.

6. If you’ve decided you truly need something, don’t buy it for two weeks. See how you feel after a ‘cooling off’ period. You’ll be surprised how often you forget or change your mind.

7. Prioritize physical fitness! I can’t stress this enough. Do you know why 20 year olds look great in just about anything? Because they are usually still in good shape. The most basic, plain vanilla clothes will look amazing on a well-kept body. In contrast, a $2000 suit is not a substitute for a massive gut and triple chin.

While I’ve focused this on clothes, I think the concepts can be applied to all sorts of consumption goods. TVs, phones, music, restaurants, vacations. Think twice before spending your hard earned money.


http://www.planbeconomics.com/2014/08/7-ways-to-spend-less-but-still-look-good/
 

glockngold

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#46
If you’re comfortable wearing gently used clothes
All my clothes are used...
Some of them were used before they were mine. ;)
 

searcher

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#47
Trading/Bartering Online Tutorial: Intro

[video=youtube_share;h_r8VBQkEZQ]http://youtu.be/h_r8VBQkEZQ[/video]

http://youtu.be/h_r8VBQkEZQ

Published on Apr 2, 2013
This is simply an intro video to the mini series that I am about to produce in the next couple weeks. If you want to learn how to Trade-Up then you will want to subscribe! I have been trading for the past 3-4 years and I have found a lot of tips and tricks that will help you be successful.


TRADING UP! LIKE A BOSS: TUTORIAL

[video=youtube_share;ejWa8Vcnxpc]http://youtu.be/ejWa8Vcnxpc[/video]

http://youtu.be/ejWa8Vcnxpc

Published on Apr 5, 2013

I will teach you how to trade up from items that are worth 5 dollars to 10,000 dollars. Subscribe!


Trading/Bartering Episode 2

[video=youtube_share;8-B3KEfxpHs]http://youtu.be/8-B3KEfxpHs[/video]

http://youtu.be/8-B3KEfxpHs

Published on May 6, 2013

Episode 2 of my Bartering/Trading series.



If you're interested in any more of this guy's vids here's the link to his youtube channel:https://www.youtube.com/user/jrnuggets/featured
 

agnut

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#48
Hi all. Been busy from early till late. Just replaced the exhaust manifold and pipe on the Ford backhoe. Getting a large area leveled with umpteen thousands of rocks in the ground is more work than I thought I had signed up for. Oh well, it could be worse. Ya gotta take the hard with the soft if you’re gonna plow through life.

I remember once having to call in a dynamiter to blow the granite for a swimming pool I had envisioned completing swiftly and smoothly. Yeah, right ! I went to the elementary school and picked up my older son to have him set off the final charges. Eighteen years ago and he still remembers that day. Your family will remember the memorable; it’s your job.

I was feeling lazy last Saturday and couldn’t make up my mind whether to go garage sailing or work at home or goof off. My insatiable curiosity of what I might miss if I didn’t go was the overriding factor. I set up a few promising garage sale ads and was on my way. Once I fired up the old Dodge I was committed and always felt adventuresome throughout the journey.

The first sale had a Charbroil offset smoker I wanted. The seller had it hiding out back; I had to ask. She wanted $20 and I offered $10 and she agreed. She also had 3 ammo boxes and I got them for a dollar each. Two are in the back of my truck now, holding rope and straps and chains for towing. It is and has been a buyers’ market for a long time.

The next sale was on the way to the big sale I was anticipating a score. I stopped in, not expecting much; it was in a trailer park. I did get :

5 2 gallon gas cans for $1 each
50’ extension cord for $1
2 Scrabble sets for $1 each
Thermos ½ gallon pump coffee dispenser for $2
“Rome” season 1 and 2 for $1.50 each season
12 DVDs for 50 cents each

The last sale was in a nice neighborhood, country acreage, manicured landscape. I had to park on the street and walk in a ways. The sellers knew me but I didn‘t know them; I must be getting a reputation. Something told me that I might want to cover a wider area. Make myself scarce, that is. There are towns 30 to 45 minutes away that would be ripe for the picking. Admittedly, I’ve been lazy since my local area has been so good to me.

I got :

15 Harley Davidson vintage T shirts, vests for $1 each
4 Harley Davidson vintage hats for $1 each
11 X Box games for $1 each
A Grateful Dead vintage T shirt for $1
A Playstation 2 game console with controls, 20 game cartridges, Guitar Hero (a guitar with no strings attached; the next step up from an air guitar I suppose), and 3 extra memory chips for a grand total of $25

The Harley shirts and hats I gave away to relatives. I did keep one hat since I like Harleys although I’ve never owned one. Maybe as a reminder back in the early 70s when I had my first VW shop in the back of a motorcycle gang’s warehouse. The Storm Troopers, they were called. What a bunch of characters; the leader was sort of a R rated version of the Fonz. Ah, the memories.

The X Box games and Playstation package went to my younger son and he paid me for them. I’m always on the lookout for certain items for each person I know. Now that I think about it I’ve never had anyone not want what I have found for them. It was usually a celebration, like opening a birthday gift. But there is something here at play and that is that a person receiving something unexpected is an uplifting experience.

We all need to know that our lives are not just passing time until we pass on but that we have an impact on those around us. Some are family, some are friends, some are strangers and some are strangers who will become friends. What better way to show that you are thinking of others than to know what they are looking for, find it and present it to them. That’s the icing on the cake for me.

The third ammo box ? I gave it away to someone who helped me load the truck at the last sale. He asked me if I would sell it and I said that he could have it. He at first couldn’t believe it. Funny how something so insignificant to me could be so valuable to someone else. That was my good deed for the day. Or was it ? After all, he had helped me out of the goodness of his heart. And he had shown me some of the bargains that I might not have found on my own like the Grateful Dead T shirt which I don’t know whether to wear it, sell it or frame it. I did look on eBay and there was only one like mine among hundreds. It was in new condition and the seller was asking $175. Mine has been worn but is in excellent condition for its age. Still glad to have found it but don’t know what to do with it. Not yet, that is. I have learned that something I bought and set aside and didn’t know why I had gotten it in the first place would someday find someone who would treasure it. This is a golden thread running through my bartering and horse trading but it took a while for me to appreciate its beauty.

Best wishes,

Agnut

Frugal is the new cool. Pass it on.

P.S I have a long list of items I have bought with prices paid. This is through the last four years. If you are interested I could start to post them. They may help you see relative values and prices paid when you are out on the prowl.
 

glockngold

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#49
P.S I have a long list of items I have bought with prices paid. This is through the last four years. If you are interested I could start to post them. They may help you see relative values and prices paid when you are out on the prowl.
Agnut,
Sure, I'd like to hear your scores. As you know, the price that people are willing to let go of stuff is different at each house you visit.
For instance, last Saturday, a house had ammo cans priced at $20.00 each (and yes they were empty).
Old plastic Vented gas cans are getting harder to find. Flea market dealers are selling them for $10.00 & up.
I think you will enjoy the series Rome. I was disappointed when a 3rd season was not made.
If you have the time to take & post some pics of your excavation projects, I 'd like to see what you're up to.
 
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#50
Hi Agnut !, First post, glad to be here.
Here are some pics of my " new" furniture I horse traded with my step dad.
I have learned a lot from you through him.
I will never understand peoples obsession with new things or leased anything.
You will never catch me " making payments " on a sofa, or even a car for that matter.
My entire living room setup cost me 50 dollars, more pictures later.
Ann
 

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agnut

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#51
Hi Searcher. Thank you so much for your posts 45 and 47. Amazing stuff and funny that this information is freely available that can be so life changing. For money is the financial blood flowing through the body of our activities. Too little money and we become anemic and listless and prone to disease. Disease is dis ease, a lack of ease in one’s life.

As we know, it’s not the money we have coming in that determines our financial peace but how we spend that money. Bartering and horse trading offers this and also a means to make more money through wise buying and selling/trading. Ben Franklin said that a penny saved is a penny earned but with our onerous taxation I would paraphrase that to a penny saved was two pennies earned. So we have to be smarter than what life required in the past in order to make gains for our own future.

Sometimes I feel that I am missing in sharing some areas of opportunities that would make significant differences in our lives. For instance, what about buying out a whole defunct companies’ inventory ? I have done this a couple of times and they were both highly beneficial. How to find these opportunities requires a different approach and I will write about it when time permits.

To venture forth into the unfamiliar carries risk. To not venture forth carries certainty of status quo. We are not made to be complacent but rather to test ourselves, to expand our horizons, to grow, to reach out for the stars.

Best wishes and keep up the great posts. I see your writings on other threads and enjoy them. Thought provoking stuff indeed.

Agnut
 

agnut

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#52
Hi Glockngold. You are so right in that prices can vary dramatically. I wonder if the seller of the ammo cans was looking at them like they were collectible as well as very useful. Also, they may be rarely offered for sale in your area. Here in the Pacific northwest there are a lot of hunters and some military both active and retired. Maybe this explains why I find these ammo boxes so cheap. I will, of course, continue to buy all that I come across. Is there such a thing as having too many ammo cans ?

By the way I also have the large ammo boxes that you can sit on or convert into a cooler. I got them for under $5 each. They sit in the barn until they are needed or traded.

The earlier spout gas cans are becoming popular because they aren’t being sold in the stores and the new ones are a pain in the ass. Another example of the govt motto “If it ain’t broke, fix it until it is broke”. This is why I have 50 or more earlier gas cans and, like the ammo cans, I will continue to buy them as long as the price is right.

So don’t feel frustrated that the prices are so high in your area. There are other areas with different demographics which may yield bargains. Successful buying has a lot to do with the sellers and their life situations. I have had the best luck with homes around golf courses, high end communities, estate sales and moving sales. This is where you will find high quality merchandise. A young family with children, God bless them, will not usually have any valuable items for sale; everything they have is being invested in their children, as it should be. Think of what kind of sellers you want to buy from and find the areas in which they live.

I would recommend hooking up with some estate dealers and following their sales. Some can be either price tag or auction; I prefer the former because I can deal face to face and haggle a better price. As I wrote before, the auction type estate sale draws in those buyers who will often go nuts bidding due to their inexperience or ego. Oh, don’t forget the military auctions too.

Now I’m not like other barter and horse traders in that I buy and hold rather than seek a profit right away. The items I have are better than money in the bank; they increase in value through time. I think the dollar lost purchasing power of about 9% last year. So like Alice In Wonderland we are having to run in order to stay in the same place.

People work for money, people work with money and sometimes money works for people.

People who work for money usually have a job. I’m not disparaging them; they are the backbone of our civilization. Some have been blessed to love what they are doing; in Ireland that is not considered work. Something to think about.

People who work with money are entrepreneurial; they go forth and seek potentials. Bartering and horse trading covers it pretty well.

People who have money working for them are investors. They find a company with potential and they put their money down. They buy a rental complex and have it managed. There are many ways that people do this but they generally require time, lots of time in which to reap a return that pays back the original investment plus income sufficient to counteract inflation and taxation. Here is where I stop and think that this isn’t what I would want to do because I have little faith that the future we face in the next 10 years will be similar to what we have experienced in the past. So I have worked with money for many years and it has done me well. I used to buy cars, fix them up and resell them for a profit. But you have to be careful in this particular specialty; there is so much that cannot be foreseen before the actual purchase. I took the attitude that a certain percentage would not turn out as well as I had estimated. Perhaps adding 10 to 20 percent to estimated cost of fixing up would cushion any uglies showing up on your doorstep.

A few of hours ago I got stung on the left forearm 4 or 5 times by a wasp and am still swollen up like Popeye’s arm but without the anchor tattoo. Funny but I felt hardly anything when it happened but swelled up much later. We are still working dawn to dusk, 7 days a week. We are trying to finish three major projects before the rain and cold weather sets in. The circular drive and parking lot are pretty flat but the road out to the north field needs to be filled another 12 to 14 inches in order to channel the winter rains into the drain box. Still need to get about 35 yards of ¾ gravel and spread it.

The second project is getting the deck built on the west side of the house. The carpenter was here today laying out the elevation lines. Materials are paid for and will arrive tomorrow. He should be done by this weekend.

The third project is the pond for catfish. It will probably be our swimming hole also. I was clearing out the land and pulling trees. When I finished for the evening I parked the tractor. When I came out the next morning the left rear tire was completely flat. I pumped it up (four trips with an air bottle) enough to move it to flat land and put it on some heavy duty jack stands that I had bought at a garage sale a few years back. I couldn’t resist them at $5 for the pair. They are so big and heavy that nobody wanted them; I had no use for them at the time. I didn’t even have the Ford backhoe then. Here is a lesson for all of us. When we see something that we don’t think we will need it or even find someone who will want it, think deeper and use your imagination. What is the material worth ? What would it cost in labor and materials to make this item ? What could someone you know use this item for ? Would this item make a good gift for someone you know ?

By the way I called a local tire store and they quoted $95 an hour to drive here to fix it. That could easily run into hundreds of dollars. I asked him what it would cost to replace the tire valve and he said that labor would be $45 plus the tire valve. I think I have an inner tube valve leak so that estimate will be higher whether he comes here or I take the tire to him. Tomorrow four of us are going to put the tire in my truck so that I can take it into town. I haven‘t ever done anything like this before; this rear backhoe tire is a monster and would kill a dog if it fell over on him. I hope I’m not that old dog. Wish me luck.

Best wishes,

Agnut

P.S. I’ll try to answer our new member vintagegal as soon as I can. Wow ! Her first post and on the bartering and horse trading thread too. I’m flattered. Great photos too; puts me to shame. Makes me want to post some of the photos of my own deals but first I need to convert over from XP desktop to my new windows 7 laptop.

Did I mention that my XP computer crashed and I had to reconfigure it (slap it around until it came to its senses). I’m not a violent man but my computer has had me looking for a hatchet from time to time. Maybe a defibrillator would be more appropriate. Possibly a book on creative things that could be done to a misbehaving computer ? Or, dare I say, a movie ? Talk about cosmic relief.

I’ll post some items I have found and the dates I found them so as not to distort the time value of items. Some things I had decades ago would have made me rich (ha ha what the hell is rich ? I don‘t need no stinkin’ money to be rich) if I had held onto them until today.

The HOB series “Rome” is a saucy slice of life among the rich and powerful. Reminds me that things don’t change through time; just the actors.
 

agnut

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#53
Hi and welcome vintagegal. Your post tells me that you are well on the road to knowing just how important money management is. I have a quote I made up; the filthiest four letter word in the English language is debt. I have no debts and no need to borrow. Life is much simpler this way.

Paying retail prices is for the unimaginative. Your $50 living room setup is an example of your wisdom. And I don’t take that word wisdom lightly. It is rare to find a wise young person; wisdom usually comes from experience and experience comes through much time. I have always contended that an intelligent parent has the capability to guide and be the mentor for their children so that they can become world wise at an early age.

Your step dad and I have been communicating for several years. He is wise and has a big heart. Listen to him and take advantage of his experience. I hope that he will come here for a visit someday.

Some great photos there. That cabinet made by Hitchcock looks to be a high end piece of furniture. It doesn’t have to be old to be valuable but it does have to be well made and in good condition. Was the couch with wood trim also part of the deal ? I once had an older couch that also had wood trim; when I bought it I was told that it was stuffed with horsehair. I bought it in 1971 in Erie Pennsylvania and hauled it with a load of other antique furniture to West Palm Beach. But that is a story for another time.

You might wish to specialize in antique and vintage furniture. There is a wide variety of items we all may decide to focus upon. Me ? I collect old vinyl records, DVDs and American made tools. Also enamel on copper paintings. What we collect may change in time and again it may become a lifetime passion. I once collected Italian micro mosaic jewelry; I was going to publish a book since I have never found a book devoted exclusively to the micro mosaic arts. I had about 250 pieces and had photographed them but my skills are not up to what I would like to have published. I sold almost all of the pieces and moved on. I still have the photos as fond memories of those days. Someday you may remember what I am writing here and realize that you had done a similar thing in your life.

I have a three door oak ice box that I picked up at a garage sale a few years ago. I have always wanted one but never saw one that caught my eye. Lazy butt that I am, I decided to fly straight and actually be there before the garage sale opened. Good thing too since I made a beeline to this oak ice box. The price on it was $75; I offered $60 and she agreed. As my son and I were loading it into the truck a lady came by and said that she had wanted it also. So a few seconds later and I would have been the one lamenting. The early bird gets the worm but the second mouse gets the cheese. I looked on Craigslist the other day and the two ice boxes like mine were $650 and $1,000.

I could either keep the ice box to enjoy while it goes up in value (hopefully) or I could sell it and continue to buy more bargain items. The latter choice is the way to pyramid one’s money into a fortune.

Turnover at a rapid pace creates a parabolic upward until you will not have the time to buy and sell enough to continue the upward journey. I know; I have been there before.

Imagine an item that you could buy for $150 and sell for $1,500. We call that a ten bagger; getting ten times what you paid for it. And say you had three of such items with an investment of $450. You sell them and now have $4,500. Next you buy 30 items and you sell for $45,000. The last step is that you buy 300 of these items and sell them for $450,000. That is near a half a million dollars. And all done in three steps. But to progress to the next step of selling for $4,500,000 you would have to find 3,000 of these items. This is where you would run into a brick wall. Either the items are becoming scarce or the sellers are demanding a higher price since by now they are probably on to you. My point is that there is a limit to how much you can do and therefore it is vitally important that you choose which items in which to specialize.

At the other end of the spectrum would be something low cost like used vinyl records. You could buy them for 50 cents and sell them for $2 which is a four bagger. Suppose you have buyers taking 100 records at a time. Your net profit would be $150. And also suppose that you had one of these buyers 5 days a week; you would be making $750 per week. Sounds good ? Well it isn’t. The reality is that you would need a place to store these records as well as display them so that buyers could pick through what they are looking for. This place would need to be large enough to house the thousands of records you would need. The rent alone would devastate your net profit at the end of the month. Not to mention the taxes and employee costs. And there is insurance and electric to pay too. Do you see anyone making a killing by owning a record store ?

You should not be looking to make a living but rather make a killing for your efforts. There are ways to avoid the rent and employee burdens. I know of people who deal in Persian rugs and antiques and sell them from their home. It is a leisurely lifestyle in which one can determine one’s hours whether to work or play while others are working the 8-5 Monday to Friday grind. I think that the best business plan is to operate from home; no overhead, so no pressure except making enough to pay the rent and other personal expenses. The largest reason a business fails is under capitalization.

I once began a transmission business in an old model A garage sitting in a field on 200 acres; it was leaning over and the landlord and I straightened it up and made it safe. The rent was $75 a month and sometimes I worked while the snow was falling; no heat or electric in the beginning. I have been flat broke and also considered rich but never questioned my drive to succeed. In time I grew the business into a million dollar operation with as many as 12 employees.

We have the world at our feet and do not even realize just how fortunate that we are. No criticism here but rather an observation of an old man who has been blessed to have lived multiple lives wrapped into one. With the right attitude and knowledge you can go as far as you want. I have always said that if you can’t make it in America, you can’t make it anywhere. Why ? Because there is so much more opportunity here than where most foreigners come from. Neil Diamond’s song “Coming To America” comes to mind. Can’t you hear it ?

My best advice is to find something that you love doing and make it work for you. And listen to family and true friends; they have your best interests at heart.

Bartering and horsetrading can be a lifestyle in which one has the freedom to be your own boss, to work as much or as little as you want, to determine your hours, to go on the hunt for items with a sense of adventure, to go to new places, to meet interesting people, to establish relationships and much more. It can be a sideline source of income, a hobby or even a full time endeavor. That is up to you.

I collect quotes and have thousands of them from which to draw understanding. Here is a favorite I go by :

"To laugh often and much; to win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children; to earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends; to appreciate beauty, to find the best in others; to leave the world a little better; whether by a healthy child, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is the meaning of success. "
Ralph Waldo Emerson

Best wishes,

Agnut

Frugal is the new cool. Pass it on….

“I was part of that strange race of people aptly described as spending their lives doing things they detest, to make money they don’t want, to buy things they don’t need, to impress people they don’t like.” ? Emile Gauvreau
 

agnut

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#54
Okay, I’m going to post lots of bartering and horse trading material from the past. Some will have prices paid for items, some will be experiences and some will be ramblings about world situations and how they affect us personally. Let me know if this works for you. Maybe suitable for bottom of the birdcage.
========================================

September 2010

I was at a local thrift store recently and got 7 really nice shirts for a buck each. Also got 17 record albums. Four were valued at $50 each, one at $40 a couple at $30 each and a few at $20 each. All in like new condition and for a dime each, it was too good to turn down. Well, unless I would have had to pay in silver dimes. I only look at the catalog prices to tell me of the relative rarity and possibly the desirability of individual albums. Don’t expect to get anything near the prices quoted. I’m not selling; only buying. Maybe some day I will sell some but right now the fun is chasing down interesting vinyl.

While I was picking out records at this thrift store, a gentleman came up and asked if I was a record collector. I said that I pick them up from time to time. He said that he has some records he wants to sell. I asked him how many he has and he replied that he has around 3,000, mostly rock and roll like the Beatles and Rolling Stones. He gave me his number and said to call when we could get together. I’ll let you know how that works out. A deal ain’t a deal until it is done and you are hauling home the goods. If you don’t hold it, you don’t own it; Ponce’s quote especially applies here.

See ? This is what I’m talking about where just getting out there and mingling can sometimes have dramatic results. Not all deals work out; we just have to play the odds. Right now my plate is full with the transmission business and getting prepared for this winter. I wish I had more time to chase the deals full time. I will warn you that it will get in your blood in time and you will always be looking for that next ’fix”. I guess I have become a junk junkie.

By the way, business has been the worst I have seen in 40 years and I ship nationwide. Almost nobody calling for price quotes and no sales for the last 11 weeks. And just yesterday I may have made my first sale. That is, if the customer follows through with what he said. I won’t know for a few days.

A huge supplier of auto cores and parts told me that he was off 80 to 90 percent and that he is losing money each month. How long can such businesses hang on until they go broke ? And how long will it be until business returns ?

If we lose some of these suppliers, what is to happen to the cost of rebuilding anything automotive ? Not to mention the potential for unavailability of parts or ingredients in order to have a finished product. It would be the death of the business process as we know it. And this is also true for other industries as well.

Question is, what would replace the independent automotive rebuild/ remanufacture industry ? The parts departments of the new car dealers ? Have you seen their prices ? You want to talk about double or triple the price ? Talk about inflationary.

I have been reading the writing on the wall for several months. First, there was the parents who would pay for a rebuilt transmission for their sons and daughters. Next came the customers who began asking if I had a used transmission for sale. And finally, the phones stopped ringing. Well, except for all the advertisers, telemarketers, lenders, and wrong numbers.

Money (and credit) have become so hard to come by that customers are buying used transmissions from wrecking yards and from private parties who are parting out their own wrecked cars. Every car parting out ad on Craigslist has everything for sale except the manual transmission. These sell first, even before the ad comes out. And this may be my saving grace. I can repair a transmission with new seals and used parts that will be far superior to what the used transmission market can offer. And I believe I can offer them at the same price.

As a test, I repaired 2 such transmissions in the past year in anticipation of what I am seeing happen now. I was right; it can be done. Darwin was right; the survival of the species does not go to the fastest or strongest but rather to those most adaptable to change. We humans have the capacity to often foresee the future and prepare for the necessary adaptations well in advance.

If money and credit are to continue to be tight, it would be smart to realize that making half the net profit could be just as financially rewarding as in the past. Prices for many things are falling greatly.

And who knows, at the lower profit levels, there may be more than a doubling in sales volume from the old days. Twice the labor for the same pay but the profit’s purchasing power may double. Could be a winner in disguise.

The overview is to be able to pay the bills without going into the hole and therefore protect the nest eggs of preps and PMs. Adapting is the key. I’ve adapted all of my life and have learned to be content with its demands. Actually, it is exciting experiencing change. Like stretching out the muscles of the mind to see how far and well they can take you.

I have also concluded that big ticket item businesses will not return to normal for years; maybe never. Grindingly slow is the new normal and we have to learn to survive under such conditions until our competition goes under and/or buyers get out of debt.

I was fortunate to foresee this coming and have also been fortunate to have been able to financially position myself beforehand. I pay no business rent since I work at home; rent cost is a big killer. And I have no employees like my last business in which I had 12 employees to pay; employee cost is the biggest killer, especially when things are dead. The future will include the growth of many cottage industries. Low to no overhead one man operations. Heck, even if I only rebuild a few transmissions per year I will be okay.

Gotta go soon to pick up another 500 pounds of fruits and veggies. For the cows and chickens, of course.
============================================================
December 2010

Wouldn’t it be interesting if we all were to calculate the savings by buying used items and then invest that savings into physical silver ? Could amount to a life’s savings in time. But this doesn’t usually happen since we all are pinching pennies and don’t have discretionary money for long term investments.

A few days ago I received a call from a seller who I had put on the back burner. It was for a large quantity of vinyl records. I wrote of this on Sept 29 when I had first met this seller. So it has been two and a half months until I completed the deal. Turns out, he had “only” 1,400 records. I bought them for a total of $100. There were about 25 half speed master recordings. The last one I bought 15 years ago cost me $31 new. So I guess I got more that what I paid for in just those 25 records. The rest were a lifetime collection of rock and roll starting in the mid 1960s. Some really great stuff.

And to top that, he sold me a laser guided Technics turntable where the person never touches the tone arm; it is automatic. This accounts for why almost all of the records had no scratches on them. Oh, by the way, he sold me the turntable for $5 !

I asked the all important question, “What else have you got for sale ? He had about 60 Cds for $5; I bought them, not knowing what they were and later found about 15 I put aside for my own listening.. The rest I may give away or sell at a garage sale. Hey, I’m a packrat and can’t help myself.

He asked if I was interested in antiques and then pulled out a box full of antique jewelry and art objects. Some beautiful jade and ivory pieces. I still haven’t valued them all. A carved ivory bracelet like mine was on Ebay for $350 and some of the jade pieces were surprisingly expensive from what I could gather from Ebay and retail prices. The whole box cost me $30 !

This seller has lots more he wants to get rid of including a huge chest full of old baseball cards going back to the days of Babe Ruth and earlier. He said that they are in protective individual packaging. I know almost nothing about baseball cards and could lose my ass so I need to do some research before going into this. The whole chest may cost a couple of thousand dollars and I’m not sure that I want to risk this much capital. I’ve done this in the past and always come out smelling like roses but just one big slipup can destroy a year’s bargain hunting profits. My hesitance is that baseball cards are a hobby and the economy is bad and fragile and could break down without warning. So who would want baseball cards after a market crash ? Well, if I could get the lot cheap and sell off enough cards to recoup my initial investment within short order, it may be worth the risk.

And who knows; maybe I won’t even be able to make this baseball card deal in the future. This is why I always have my eyes and ears open for deals to make. Some fall through and some come in big winners but I try to always have some deals in the works.

========================================
That’s it for right now.

Best wishes,

Agnut

The Coinage Act of April 2, 1792
(1 Stat. 246)
Statute I.
April 2, 1792 Chapter XVI.–An Act Establishing a Mint, and regulating the coins of the United States.
Section 19. And be it further enacted, That if any of the gold or silver coins which shall be struck or coined at the said mint shall be debased or made worse as to the proportion of the fine gold or fine silver therein contained, or shall be of less weight or value than the same out to be pursuant to the directions of this act, through the default or with the connivance of any of the officers or persons who shall be employed at the said mint, for the purpose of profit or gain, or otherwise with a fraudulent intent, and if any of the said officers or persons shall embezzle any of the metals which shall at any time be committed to their charge for the purpose of being coined, or any of the coins which shall be struck or coined at the said mint, every such officer or person who shall commit any or either of the said offenses, shall be deemed guilty of felony, and shall suffer death.
 

agnut

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#55
Next stuff :

December 2010

Last summer I tried trading boxes of Iowa beef for a transmission rebuild but so far, no cigar. But you never know, the seller may need my services and I have kept his phone number.

I cannot overemphasize the importance of keeping records and phone numbers for future networking. In my last post I wrote of waiting two and a half months for a record deal. If I hadn’t called him occasionally (bordering on pestering, actually), I would have missed the deal. And future deals with him. Only time will tell as to how big this one connection will turn out. The uncertainty in deal making can be a positive in that so many folks avoid uncertainty like the plague; therefore there is little competition.

It is oxymoronic (especially the moron part) that most folks will not venture forth into what they perceive as the unknown/uncertainty of taking a risk when the reality is that Not taking a risk is a far, far greater potential loss than to have taken the risk/venture in itself. Because only by expanding our horizons can we see the broader picture and grow to become more that we were in the past.

========================================


These great deals do show up from time to time; the key is that we barterer and horse traders HAVE to get out there and see what is being offered.
The more we all contribute to this thread, the more viewers will read and see such fantastic deals can be made. I mean fantastically good; not a fantasy. HaHa

I am looking for candles; the bigger the better. Doesn’t matter if they are used or not; the weight of the wax in the candle is my focus. Why ? Well that wax may be melted down later to make candles and you never know, candles and candle wax may become hard to come by. Anybody know what the price is for a pound of candle wax ?It is like when my grandmother collected scraps of cloth and balls of string. She lived through the last depression and the times must have been so scarring/dramatic that for the rest of her life she continued this and other frugalities.

Keep collecting the nails, especially the 40 and 50 pound boxes like Home Depot sells. I have gotten several boxes for from $1 to $3 a box at garage sales.

The first place I go to when garage sailing is the free stuff. Copper, brass, aluminum, wiring and lots more. This free stuff will often pay for your gas to get there in the first place.
=========================================
January 2011

I think that a husband wife team who garage and estate sale is one of the best things to cement a relationship. Always something happening new and unexpected, so that the many years of marriage are kept alive and vibrant. Not everything but just another facet of the gem of a brilliant marriage. Boy, I am getting to wax poetical here. Better stop before members label me a “metrosexual”. HaHa

I also have a list of things that my friends and family are looking for. A few months ago my sister said that she wanted an entryway bench for putting on and taking off shoes. Can you believe that the very next time I was out garage sailing, a short church pew showed up. It was made of solid hardwood and in perfect condition (no hearts and initials carved into it). The seller wanted $150; I offered $50 and he didn’t even haggle but accepted my offer. I took it over to my sister’s house and she was (and still is) thrilled with it.

I believe that there is more to this deal making than meets the eye, much more valuable than the deal itself. Sure, my sister got a bench that she probably otherwise would have not found. That’s a given but every time she looks at that bench she may think of me and my helping her attain a desire. Can you put a value on helping another ? Of course you can; but the heart doesn’t measure in dollars and cents. The heart measures in care and love shared.

I wrote of this in my last post :

“Trading with your neighbors is somewhat different than buying at a garage or estate sale. Your neighbors are like extended family. Trading with neighbors is less cut and dried and generosity in what you give in the deal is a reflection of you character and regard for them. It can be a beautiful thing which cements a community together. “

Life is chock full of uncertainties; to solve some of these uncertainties for others is one of the most satisfying activities we can do. What goes around comes around. I don’t expect rewards in return; the act of helping others is its own reward. However, don’t be surprised when you do receive wonderful things coming around to you ! That’s just the way it works as I’ve discovered. This is probably the greatest benefit of bartering and horse trading. Sure, I write of the deals I make but this is only to illustrate the fabulous (not gay here) amounts of money saved and to encourage others to do likewise.

Folks who a become deeply immersed in bartering and horse trading should take full advantage of this looking for items for friends and family. For example, a friend’s favorite actor is Jack Nicholson and his favorite movie is “The Shining”. Several months ago I was out garage sailing and spotted a hardbound edition of The Shining; I got it for 50 cents. My friend was happily surprised; it made my day. So what is 50 cents in the whole scheme of life ? It’s like getting two bargains at the same time ! HaHa

When I reflect on my past years of dealings, the ones I remember best are the ones where I made someone happy. Not only friends or family but also those who I bought from and sold to. As I have written in the past, bartering and horse trading is a way of life. My hope is that others will understand the fullness of it and become as pleased with it as I have.

Muffin, sounds like your mom has been doing the above for some time. Shows heart and caring for you, doesn’t it ? And that can’t be quantified or bought with mere money.

I have made some deals since I last posted and will write of them soon. To me, its like Christmas morning happening throughout the year.

Children were what parents watched before there was television.
agnut

=====================================================
February 2011

As an aside, here’s the year 2010 record precious metal performance as posted by Vronsky of the Gold-Eagle website :

Palladium.......................+96%
Silver..........................+83%
Gold............................+30%
Platinum........................+20%
Dow Stocks Index................+11%

“Expect something similar in 2011.”
Vronsky

I have been thinking about the great rise in silver spot prices and what it means for us who hold physical silver.

Should we sell some of our silver now that it has increased so much lately ?

Perhaps a flagon of Shakespeare would set a pace for our consideration :

To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause: there's the respect
That makes calamity of so long life;
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
The pangs of despised love, the law's delay,
The insolence of office and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscover'd country from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pith and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry,
And lose the name of action. - Soft you now!
The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons
Be all my sins remember'd.



To sell or not to sell……That is the question. Whether ‘tis nobler in the minds of men…blah, blah, blah.

Forget “suffering the slings and arrows” of critics of your actions; we all will come to the point wherein we seriously consider whether we would be better off in the long run to sell some of our silver for physical assets. Don’t think so ? Well, what if silver were to rise to $200 per ounce amid an environment of falling prices for cars, houses, land, etc ?

This most assuredly is not a simple decision and it will dramatically affect one’s future. Many factors would be involved such as the need for the physical items, their potential for growth in future value, the relative amount of ounces of silver someone has, perception of further silver price increases relative to purchasing power, and so on.

And I’m not just talking about silver here; this thinking covers ALL items over which we have possession/ownership. For instance, a spare pickup truck may be sold in order to buy silver right now at about $30 per ounce. That is, if we have confidence that silver prices will soon increase in purchasing power. Or we may decide to buy a high miles per gallon car in anticipation of skyrocketing fuel prices. There are many decisions to make (even not selling any silver is a decision in itself). If I had bought silver in 2000 for $5 per ounce with the current price at $30 (a 500% profit), I would not sell now unless I had no other alternative. Lately there have been articles predicting $200 and $500 per ounce silver. That’s a nice thought but what if a loaf of bread costs $50 at that same time in the future ?

The same thing holds true for my thousands of vinyl records. Even though I may be able to sell them for $1 each now, I am waiting for them to become more in demand which will drive their price up. Like so many collectables, there is a time in which they have almost no demand and therefore no value. This is the time to buy and enjoy them and wait. At an average purchase price of about 10 cents each, I don’t have much invested. Some catalog out as high as $100 but I only use that as an indicator of their relative demand and scarcity.

So what deals have I made lately ?

My son told me about a 1981 Datsun diesel pickup truck that was on Craigslist. It was only a few miles away so I called him and immediately went over for a looksee. The body had some rust on a door and a sheet metal front lower panel but the rest looked okay. It hadn’t been started in 6 months so the owner put a charged battery in it and it fired up the first try. You can’t do that with a gas car as gas will gum up the carburetor or injectors and will turn to varnish if allowed to sit for 6 months.

My son and I took it for a drive and the engine was smooth running as well as the 5 speed transmission. All the lights work as well as the clutch and brakes. He wanted $600 but agreed on my offer of $400 without quibbling. It is now parked by the orchard and currently registered, waiting until I have time to service it and insure it.

It’s a bit ugly but I have learned to not care as long as it does the job for me. I’m not out to impress anybody. Not really true; I’m out to impress readers with my practicality over costly ego driven decisions. I hope you will think about this when you make future decisions.

I have had two of these Datsun diesel pickup trucks in the past and they have always been reliable and gotten great miles per gallon.

Years ago I wrote that we are in the process of moving from form to function. So forget the sleek form of a new car and get the most functional transportation you can find. Leave your ego at the door; it has no place in the future. After all, who would you be impressing with a new car or big house ? Financial morons, that’s who !

Anyhoo, I really like these early Datsun diesel pickup trucks. They are very cheap, run just about forever, get great MPG, and the diesel fuel can be stored for a long time.

Next deal was for 24 deep cycle Trojan T-105 6 volt batteries. They cost about $170 new with tax. I bargained for them and got them for $40 each. The seller threw in the battery connectors and Zener diode charge balancers, worth about $300. My problem is that I put the cart before the horse; I don’t have a charger to keep them in shape and don’t know what to buy to keep the whole bank up and running until I find the inverter and build a place for them. Maybe a large roll around cart would work for now. The batteries weigh 1,500 pounds total. So I have spent almost $1,000 and now have to get all the other gadgets to make them run my household. Oh well, I’ll let you know as I muddle through with this project.

By the way, I may not get an array of solar panels but rather run a diesel generator to recharge the batteries. However, a couple of solar panels may be necessary to keep them topped off. If I am right, a diesel generator run with mostly used engine oil would be very cost efficient.
 

agnut

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#56
February 2011

I am a vinyl record collector as you must know by now. If somebody has a load of records for sale at a bargain price, I’m heading there as soon as I can get my pants on. I have been thinking about where the deals may be in the years to come as well as what the records will be worth and who would be buying them.

Quote:
“For LPs, look for things like more obscure Rolling Stones and Beatles records in their original sleeve and un-scratched, says Tucci. You could sell one of these for about $500.”

That is a nice thought but I have learned that rare is rarely found. The high dollar vinyl records are rarely found in my experience. I have yet to find any records valued in the Goldmine catalogs for over $100 and have only two at that price. However, I do have many valued at $40 and $50 each. I especially look for old jazz and early rock and roll. Because they are so old, 50 or 60 years, most are scratched or the jackets are worn badly.

I was in the local thrift store the other day and looked at several hundred records but bought one box set of classical piano music. There were 9 records in the set and all in perfect condition. I paid 98 cents with sales tax, typical of my 10 cents per record average. I didn’t buy for a later profit but for my own pleasure. Maybe I will make a profit someday but just playing them with my sons once will be profit enough for me.

Who owned the rock and roll records and who owned the jazz and classical records ? Easy to conclude which records look like they have been dragged down a gravel road and which have been treated with love and care. I would say that if you can find an older collector who has a large lifetime’s collection, you may well have a bargain there from a condition standpoint. This is critically important since even a rare record which is all scratched up will be worth practically nothing.

As in all things when bartering and horse trading, it requires us to think on the fly. We have to be alert when dealing. Not for the dull witted, drugged out, drunks or lazy. That probably leaves out most of the population which is actually to our advantage.

The season will begin in earnest as the weather warms up. So now is the time to get organized and have maps, cash, newspaper subscriptions, etc ready. And if you are like me, you haven’t even gone through all the goodies you bought last season.


Sometimes problems will work themselves out if you will let them. Telling friends and asking often opens doors. You never know until you try.
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My 4 children are all grown now but I can remember the early years and the secret of what is important to the child. And what will be remembered through the years. Playing with them.

Might I suggest that you begin to play ball with your child from as early an age as possible. It has been shown that simply sitting down on the floor and rolling a ball to a small child and having them roll it back somehow encourages early mental development. I did it with my sons when they were little and continued it through the years into playing soccer and baseball and basketball. I also blew bubbles for them and they delighted in popping them. I firmly believe that these connections we make with our children are the cement which connects them to us for the rest of their and our lives. Have a blast with your children; I did and it is still paying off in ways that nothing else could.

Things given to children are usually forgotten unless we as parents use these things to share ourselves and our time with them. I read to my children and sang them to sleep when they were little. I think that’s where they learned to put their hands over their ears.

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The overview is that through “globalization”, we in the US by having had our manufacturing shipped overseas are in the process of becoming a banana republic without the bananas. Our horrendous foreign trade deficit stands in mute testimony of that fact.

So what can we do other than what we have already done in prepping ?

1. Get rid of all unnecessary things we have. Sell them and invest in further prepping whether food, precious metals, nickels, or whatever floats your boat (think Noah). This is easy to advise but not easy to put into action. I know; I have lots of things I should sell but can’t seem to get it in gear. I just hope you are better than me at this.

2. Make a concerted effort to hold on to what you do have. The funding for the future to protect this is most important. I don’t like dollars any more that you but I consider it a necessity for paying ongoing living expenses, even as the dollar continues to lose purchasing power. This is because it is the only recognized currency at this time. In other words, don’t put all your eggs in one basket. Even if some of the eggs are approaching their “use by” date. Hell, I know the dollar will fall in time; every fiat currency has collapsed throughout history. But we all need to get from now to a future when/if the world wakes up to the truth of real money.

3. Finish your prepping since time is becoming short and you may not be able to get some of the things you will need later. I’m looking at inverters for my 24 batteries right now. It would be nice to have at least some electricity when either the power fails or becomes prohibitively expensive. I’m even considering a steam engine to power a generator for my batteries since it can run on wood or anything that will burn. Maybe a bit extreme but we are facing extreme times.

Be aware and open to possibilities you may have missed. Water storage, caches of hidden preps, neighbors, etc.

4. Meats will become expensive in the future but we will always be able to get some with our silver. Sounds like the movie “Soylent Green”. As long as we have over 6 billion population with a couple of billion living on less than $2 a day we will have incredible food demand pressure. This is why I expect a massive die off in the coming years. It could happen rapidly as in worldwide crop failures or slowly as demand outstrips supply. It is and has been happening to the poorest marginal survivors for many years now but we don’t hear about it much because those starving are at the lowest poverty levels and don’t get much press. It is ridiculous that we in the US have been turning corn into fuel rather than food. Fuelish ? You betcha.

Whey protein is about $30 for 6 pounds at Costco. A major protein supplement in hard times. It may be a good item for long term storage too; I’ll have to look into it.

5. Make connections now for what you will need in the future. Maybe a local farmer or rancher. Neighbors, family and friends.

6. Develop some skills that will be in demand after the shit hits the fan. Bartering and horse trading are the mental skills for transacting deals wisely but they are not the items being traded themselves. The advantage is that these skills are renewable and ever present at your beck and call.

I have been an automotive mechanic for 40 years and believe this will be of some use. A stick welder, MIG welder and an acetylene torch may come in handy. Also a vertical mill and lathe. Valve refacing and grinding equipment. Drills and saws. But always be mindful of the need for the materials you will need in order to complete the job at hand. A shoe smith needs leather and other materials; where will he get them in the years ahead unless he has a source or a big stockpile ? Think renewable resources. That’s why I am thinking about a steam engine; it can run with wood fuel which is renewable and easily available all around me. Your situation may be very different. You may live in the desert where a solar system would be appropriate. See, we all have to think for ourselves. Fun, ain’t it ?

Yogi Berra said “The future ain’t what it used to be”.

Hyperstagflation decimates the middle class so that we end up like so many dictator countries. The elite and the poor with few remaining in the middle class.

Don’t compare the future with the last depression in the 1930s; it will be far different in many ways. We who are prepared will have to think on our feet as well as in a compassionate manner. Either we take care of each other or war against each other. I have my mental list of people I will be looking after. How about you ? It is a responsibility which we should joyfully carry; not a burden but rather a badge of courage and humanity. It gives one a sense great purpose in life. As I have written long ago, we are our brothers’ keepers.
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The only deal lately has come to me. A family member showed me a govt. surplus metal storage container that is about 4’x4’x6’ with doors at either end for $67 each. I will use one for my battery pack and inverter and another container for my diesel or steam generator. We’ll see; so many things are fluid right now so I have to go with the flow.

By the way, I spoke with someone who has repaired many inverters through the years and he said that what usually goes out is the diode and is cheap and easy to repair. Since a good inverter can run up to $1,500, I have been looking for a 3,000 to 5,000 watt inverter that doesn’t work. There were some on Ebay a while back for about $50 plus shipping but nothing lately. I had hoped to buy a few and have them repaired and have a primary one and a backup and sell the rest to pay for the inverters I kept for my own use. Oh well, maybe only a dream. See ? My mind is always working, looking for a better way to get what I want or need. And yours should be too !

Spring is here and the coming months should offer a wide and huge amount of potential deals. I predict one of the best ever buying and selling seasons.

Local garage sales are already springing up around here; this is earlier than in past years. People are moving away, selling for needed cash or passing on. Remember to look for and attend estate sales, moving sales and garage sales in that order.

Bulletin boards, local papers and Craigslist. Ask and ye shall receive; seek and ye shall find.

The secret of man’s being is not only to live but to have something to live for. -Dostoyevsky

When one door of happiness closes, another opens; but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one which has been opened for us. -Helen Keller
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I asked sellers a couple of times if they had any sterling silver and they said that it was not around any more; meaning that they were wistfully remembering when sterling silver was part of our American lives.

Apparently, it’s getting vacuumed up by the gold and silver buyers and coin shops. Every weekend we have these huge signs advertising buyers for gold and silver; they are at several of the major crossroads. It gives me an eerie feeling; I’m beginning to suspect that there may not be ANY precious metals left in private hands if this tight economy continues for too long. And we all know that things sure ain’t gonna get better for a loooong time.

Makes me wonder if someday a one ounce silver round will be so valuable that the sellers may not have change for goods purchased. That is why I have some 90% Mercury dimes; for change. Who knows how much it will cost for a roll of toilet paper ? A roll of toilet paper is currently about 25 cents while a 90% silver dime is worth about $2.60. So a dime would buy about 10 rolls of toilet paper.
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Hello all. I apologize for having taken so long to write. Life has been hectic for far too long. Business has fallen off the cliff but at least I had anticipated that possibility and prepared for it. Not as well as I had found necessary but I managed through it without too much discomfort. And that’s the name of the game, isn’t it ? To be prepared for what comes our way.

Lately I’ve been hitting the garage, moving and estate sales and there are some great bargains out there. Here are a few items I found with their final prices paid :

An electric salmon smoker (used twice) for $30

A Craftsman floor model band saw for $25

Two truck tires (almost new) with 8 lug rims for $5 each

5 American Racing mag 8 lug truck wheels for free

DVDs for 50 cents

A large Stress Ease chair and ottoman for $200 (about $1400 new)

An upright freezer for $25

A Pasta Express machine for $5

A tomato sauce machine for $2

Lots of early 33 1/3 vinyl records for 25 and 50 cents.

A complete Black and Decker valve seat grinding center for $25

A 3 burner barbecue with 2 propane bottles for $5

An Arrow nail gun (new) for $25

A pair of solid wood swivel bar stools for $25.

Loads of kitchen items for a few pennies on the dollar.


We are still picking up about a ton of fruits and vegetables from the local market every week. We are eating better than we ever have in the past. Mainly because we hate to see all of this great stuff going to waste. By the waist, I have lost 25 pounds in the last couple of months. Probably due to the change of diet and more activity. So this isn’t just about the money saved (I’d guess at least a couple thousand bucks per year), our health has been greatly improved.

Some gets canned, some dehydrated, some gets frozen (our freezers are stuffed full), some goes to our beefalo, some donated for free, some goes to friends. And lots gets eaten by my family. Now this fruit and veggie pickup must be going on all over the US; why hadn’t I heard about it before last year ? Because I hadn’t run across anyone doing it, that’s why.

Is anyone reading this also picking up from their local market ? Am I the only one ? Hey, somebody has to get the ripe fruit and veggies out the back door; it might as well be you !

The summer lies ahead like a banquet for those who know where to seek and find. In the next few months there will be deals made throughout the US; millions and millions of deals. For goodness sake, get out there and claim your share.

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June 2011

I asked a seller if she had any silver. The lady replied with “Do you mean sterling silver ?” She had a funny look on her face like if she had any sterling silver or 90% coins, she would not be selling them. It was just a feeling but I think I read her correctly. People are wising up and as things become tighter financially, they will begin to search for ways to make up their income shortfalls.

Already we have been seeing folks pulling back on discretionary spending (since it fell off a cliff). Next, they focused on food and paying their bills. Then came selling what they didn’t need. Now some are forced by circumstances of their own making to sell things they do need. This last situation drives down the prices of just about everything folks have to sell. In other words, a buyers’ market.

But we who have prepared, it is a two edged sword. While bargains are out there in the context of the present, what will those same items be selling for in the future ? Should we keep our powder dry and hold off buying in anticipation of future further price drops ? I am thinking about this all the time as I buy items.

That valve seat grinding center I got for $25 a while back would cost perhaps $600 if new. Did I need it ? No, I already have two other valve grinding centers. The first I paid $500 for and the second I paid $300 for. So why did I buy it if I don’t need it ?

In the first place, it was dirt cheap. What is $25 now in the scheme of things ? I could even sell it for a profit right now.

In the second place, it is a tool set which can make money rebuilding cylinder heads. And the way things are going, any new work abilities I can add may make the difference in future income between swimming and slowly drowning. It may make only $100 now and then but that $100 may well be key to financial survival.

In the third place, this particular valve seat grinding center is set up for small engine cylinder head rebuilding. Something my other ones don’t have. So I am now more diverse than before. I believe that in time, folks will be repairing small engines (and car engines too) rather than throwing them away. Our throwaway society will in time resemble places like Cuba where everything that can be of use is in high demand.

The other day our wide 4 slice toaster went on the fritz so I pulled out one I had earlier gotten for a dollar at a garage sale. Now I will be looking for another used toaster at garage sales in order to maintain my backup inventory. The toaster we are now using would cost at least $40; it is a deluxe model not normally seen except by the upper crust.

Where do I find the best merchandise ? In the best neighborhoods of course. I have maps of the local area and know exactly where these neighborhoods are. In fact, there are wealthy areas about an hour away that I have had great success. Problem is, I’m so busy that I have to really plan for such a venture.

It is important to know that the items we now take for granted will likely be very expensive, or worse, unavailable in the future. So the solution to the conflict of spending money now for backup items later is simply to find items at garage, moving and estate sales. For pennies on the dollar of course.

This economy’s devolution is like having a vise tightening on your private parts. Or more politely, your wallet. I always like to exaggerate effects/consequences in order to hammer my point home. HaHa

Even physical gold and silver sometimes have a higher and better use than holding them as insurance for the future. This statement may seem anathema to this website but let me explain before y’all get out the ropes and thumbscrews.

Say silver is at $35 per ounce and the economy is on shaky ground. Hey, it is right now, isn’t it ? So an opportunity to buy a used car comes up and you don’t have the cash. You put down a deposit to hold the car and sell some silver. For instance, if the car is $1,000, 30 ounces of silver would cover the deal. And say it takes two months to fix and sell the car for about $2,000, thus making a net profit of $1,000; doubling your money. Lots of variables here, all of which must be considered beforehand.

Will silver cost $70 in the next two months ? If so, you have worked for no profit.

Will the car be finished and sold in the time allocated ? If not, the risk increases.

Is 30 ounces all of your silver holdings or only 1% of your holdings. The percent of your silver you are willing to risk is important; the lower, the better.

The car example is what we call a one bagger; doubling your money. But I have done 10 and 20 baggers. It goes without saying that the higher the return percentage, the better the deal as well as providing a higher safety margin in case final results are not as good as originally calculated.

Making fiat money from which you sold physical silver or gold in order to later accumulate real wealth (gold and silver) is a calculated risk. I wouldn’t recommend it unless you really know what you are doing. Those who can accurately figure their risk/reward ratios can make some good money. I know, I have done it. My problem when I was much younger was that I did not know how to keep the money or even know that only gold and silver are money as J.P. Morgan said.

Well, enough running on at the mouth. The bottom line here is that we are sort of flying by the seat of our pants with much of this bartering and horse trading. Personally, I can not find anything that gives me so much pleasure and challenges while in the process of saving and making money.
 

agnut

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
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#57
June 2011

Tn…Andy and RichG were great talk radio hosts; it was like we were sitting around a country store’s pot belly stove, discussing the problems of OUR country. That’s what my grandfather did and what my father grew up seeing. That was their world then and this is our world now; so different.

After the show I realized that with our mass media, a speaker can give opinions to large numbers of listeners and we have lost the one on one personal back and forth conversations of our forefathers. What I mean to say is that opinions are much easier to impress on others while not demanding responses. And therefore listeners are not required to think deeply about what is going on. And personal involvement is diminished. Something gained but I feel that something greater has been lost. Perhaps this is why Americans appear to be doing nothing about the many things which are besieging their personal lives such as finance, crime, housing, employment, Wall Street, politics, banking and so on.

I really enjoyed doing the show and the hour flew by too fast; so much to talk about.
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I pick up kitchen knives that are US made and the German and Swedish steel quality whenever I find them.

There are times when you strike out and other times when you make a killing. So patience and steadfastness are the key. By the way, have you ever calculated the percentage of buying times that are great against the times when you struck out ? I seem to have about a 80-90 percent success rate.

I have written a long post but have to type it up and post it when time permits.

I’ve done so much buying in the last few weeks here that I am still catching up with putting it all away.

We are anxiously waiting for 24 black copper Marans chicks being hatched. I could hold 5 in the palm of my hand; they are so tiny when we get them. We’ll be raising them in the house like we did the last ones. This breed of chickens lay a dark brown egg that is considered by chefs to be gourmet (and I hear that they charge accordingly). Oh well, I’m not a connoisseur. More like a kind-of-sewer; everything goes down me.

Will post as soon as I have time. Not only have I been buying lots of stuff but have been learning valuable lessons along the way.
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The Black Copper Marans is one of the rarest breeds of chicken in the United States. It is a fascinating breed of laying chicken; producing one of the darkest chocolate-brown eggs known. It is one of the rarest breeds in this country due to the import ban on fowl in the US. They are quite common in France.

Black Copper Marans eggs are prized by French chefs. They are also the favorite egg of James Bond. Using them for eating in the United States is almost unheard of, as they are so rare and prized. A three-egg omelet would cost more than $30; wholesale.
One of the difficulties faced by breeders of the Black Copper Marans in the US is the lack of genetic diversity. Much of the breeding stock left in this country 10 years ago was of the English variety; with smooth, unfeathered legs. The French standard calls for lightly feathered legs. There are only a few breeders that have been able to produce Marans stock that comes close to the French standard.

This site is dedicated to encouraging the pursuit of the French standard in US Black Copper Marans stock.
Keep in mind that the overarching goal of this pursuit is the production of a gourmet egg. Eventually, the cost for birds and eggs of the black copper marans breed will be closer to that of less rare heritage breeds. This isn’t something to fear or hurry to beat, it is inevitable. Don’t enter the breeding market of marans with the thought of making big money on these now-valuable birds. Get involved with the eventual thought of more valuable eggs for sale to discriminating buyers such as chefs and higher income consumers. Rushing as many birds and eggs to the breeding market before the values drop will only further the downfall of the breed rather than the building of it.

http://blackcoppermarans.org/
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You are well aware that each of us is unique and sees everything through our own eyes and mind filter. Some of the things I pick up would be passed by others. Perhaps that is why I can attend a sale hours after it had begun and still be able to acquire some bargains.

A seemingly small purchase had a lesson attached which I didn’t think of until it was all over. There was a man buying a 5 gallon pail of tools for $20. But there was oil in the bottom of the bucket. This man took most of the tools out and put them in a clean bucket, leaving the oil at the bottom. After he had left I went over to the bucket and tilted it to see what was left in the oil. I asked the seller what he would want for what was left and he said $2. So I emptied the bucket of its contents and found 15 brand new American punches and drifts, 2 ½”drive sockets, needle nose pliers, a chain saw file, large Allen wrenches and a long drill bit.

Doesn’t sound like much but if I had to buy the above items new, they would have cost many times the $2 I paid. And American punches don’t come cheap; because they last longer that the pot metal Asian crap !

I got a roll of galvanized wire (about 80 pounds) for $20. More than I wanted to pay but we need it and there was no sales tax.

A huge pressure cooker for $2. The aluminum scrap is worth more than that.

2 bronze propellers for a Mercury outboard for $30. Don’t know what they are worth but we have a couple of Mercs in the family.

96 Ball and Kerr canning jars for $40.

A flight suit with a zillion zippers all over it. A buck.

A couple hundred pounds of heavy chain for $5. Probably $2-300 if new.

A 5 gallon bucket full of clevises and other fittings for $15.

A hay bale moisture checker for $50 for my son. Still had the receipt from new and was over $400. It made me proud when the first thing my son said was that not only can we check our hay but can also check others’ hay bale stacks. Fire hazard, ya know.

Several sets of new hinges and latches for free.

A Hallicraffter shortwave radio for $5. It made a static sound and I got it on the chance I could make it work.

The next garage sale had a riding mower that needed the shifter fixed. It ran and cut well. He wanted $50 and I got it for $40. The Briggs and Stratton engine was worth more than I was paying so if I couldn’t get it running economically I could at least get value from the engine. Who knows, maybe this or some other engine will be set up to run on gasified wood for recharging the 24 batteries I recently connected for off the grid power.

When I got it home my son repaired the shifter in a short while and now we have a backup riding mower. When my other riding mower broke a drive housing a few weeks ago, it was down for several days and I wasn’t looking forward to having to mow all of our grass with a walk behind mower. So this $40 riding mower will give me some peace of mind. I suppose I could sell it for a profit but I need it more than I need the money.

By the way, the electrical cable double ends were over $10 each from a supplier I found on the internet. However, a local NAPA parts house had two singles which would serve the same purpose for $4.36. So I saved over $100 by buying locally. I know, usually its cheaper to buy from the internet. But not this time.

While I was at the riding mower sale I spied a motorcycle in the corner of the garage with a not for sale sign. I asked the seller and his wife about it and he said that it was found in a field of high weeds and th4e owner gave it to him for free. The seller had been lugging it around for years and dreamed of restoring it but hadn’t the time. By the way, it was a 1965 BMW R60/2; I don’t know if I will get it but am illustrating here that persistence can pay off in a big way. Our conversation had made him consider selling the bike and I have his phone number to call later. A couple of important points here to note. First, he paid nothing for the bike so I knew that his only attachment was sentimental and actually this worked in my favor since all he saw was a pure cash income deal. And since I had learned that they were moving soon, he and his wife may be motivated to leave it behind, aka sell it to me. His asking price should be low also since he has nothing invested. Second point is this type of deal gives me the time to look up the model and year to see what it is worth and if it is worth the investment.

Got a nice Panasonic microwave for $5. Just in case our other microwave craps out.

Got a 1987 VW Scirocco that I had originally acquired for free a few years earlier. I sold it to my son a few months ago for $300 and now that I had the rebuilt diesel engine and rebuilt special ratio transmission, I had a very special need for the aerodynamic Scirocco. I bought it back for $500 but since I had netted $300 earlier, I really had only $200 out of pocket cost. Straight body and nice interior. I would be happy to talk about car deals if anyone is interested. After all, they loom large in the average budget and shouldn’t be ignored.

Take away from the above deal what you may. There is a method to my madness; it is just part of my ever changing needs within a floating valuation environment. Point is, I am very happy with the deal and my son has more money in his pocket. Who knows; this could lead to diesel conversions of more Sciroccos in the future. As far as I know, the VW factory never offered a diesel engine in the Scirocco.

I must add that I recently bought another Scirocco; it was a series I type and extremely hard to find. It is just sitting there waiting until I have the time. Funny but at my age I am still like a kid when it comes to fixing up cars.
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I have bought copper wiring and didn’t know exactly what it was worth but made a best guess at the stripped copper weight. However, I only buy it if it is so cheap that I can’t lose. If too high, I bargain it down until it is a steal or I won‘t buy it. It is almost embarrassing to relate how little I paid sometimes. I suspect that those days may come to an end as the economy gets tighter/worse. Don’t miss acquiring scrap aluminum either. Old barbecues are usually made of it and when the steel rusts out, they are thrown or given away. We get 75 cents a pound for clean scrap aluminum.

People are waking up to values of things that they had thrown away in the past. For instance I went to a garage sale yesterday that was in a upper price neighborhood; the seller had books for $5 and $7 each. I usually pay from 25 cents to no more than a dollar. I ended up buying nothing and went home empty. That was a first for me. Three weeks ago I was at a garage sale and picked up about 15 hardbound books for free. There were about 200 books there but I got to pick out some great stuff for my overflowing library. My library; what a joke. Hundreds of books are in boxes and on shelves in the barn and I can’t even get to many of them.

That same afternoon I had to go to town to pick up boxes of fruits and veggies out back of the local supermarket. On the way home I saw a couple of garage sale signs and followed them to where I got ;

A 72” projection TV screen for $20; still in the box and never used. I don’t have a projection TV but one will probably turn up one of these days. Hopefully before my Samsung DLP TV gives up the ghost.

A set of 4 mag wheels for $5 total and a spare rim and tire for a Honda for $1.

A cold weather outfit from a US submarine for a couple of bucks. I heard that they cost $150; new or used I don’t know.

A cold weather jacket from the same sub for a couple of bucks (for me).

A pair of stereo speakers for $5.

A car theft lock for the emergency brake for $1

That was it for just a few minutes while I was already in town.

Last weekend I got several items but the two compound bows I got for $7.50 each was about the best score. I could sell them but this is one of the advantages of bartering and horse trading; my son and I have been talking about setting up an archery range but didn’t want to spend the bucks for all the equipment. So last week these two bows come up out of nowhere. The only expense now is to find a set of arrows; I’m sorry to say that I may to have to buy them new because I’ve never seen any arrows for sale at any garage sales. Oh well, I guess I’ll have to change my motto; “the only thing I buy new is socks and underwear”.

Last week one of my sons was with me garage sailing and he spotted a couple of water tanks with a for sale sign beside the road we were traveling. I jotted down the number and later called the seller. He said they were 3,200 gallons each and wanted $2,000 for them. I haggled him down on the phone no less and we agreed on $1,200. I checked out the prices of the two tanks and they cost $3,500 each new so $1,200 for the pair wasn’t too bad a deal.

But here’s the kicker; he said that I could have everything in the adjoining well house for free. There was a pair of ozone generators which retail for $1,000 each and three bladder tanks which retail for $864 each. There was also a booster pump which must cost at least a few hundred dollars. And outside there was a 300 gallon heavy wall steel tank for diesel fuel or whatever I may need. Also lots of fittings, piping and several relay boxes and controllers I haven’t yet identified. Now I don’t know what I can sell the well equipment for but it was there, as they say, for the taking.

My only problem now is getting the two water tanks moved. They are 10 foot in diameter and weigh about 800 pounds each.

As I look back at my last few posts I may sound like I’m bragging. But I’m not; I’m showing what can be found out there with a bit of initiative. A sort of friendly kick in the ass, if you will.

Tonight we had the parents of a friend visit. Some great country folks and real characters. My favorite kind of people. We loaded them up with a couple of boxes of fruits and veggies. I mentioned that we were looking for some railroad ties. They said that they knew someone who had a pile of them for free and promised to call us later. They also have decades of experience in canning and will help us in the future. We must have talked continuously for a couple of hours as it grew dark. So much to share.

Starting to see how networking grows exponentially ? I’m living it and having the time of my life. I wish the same for all of you who are reading this.

On a serious note, we know (or should know by now) that we are heading into some rough times. These connections we make will benefit us as well as others. I believe that we are doing what our parents, grandparents and generations before them did with each other. It was a sense of community; of being there for each other. And I hope and believe that we will have that again someday in the not too distant future. Funny thing is, it is so easy to do and natural.

Best wishes,

agnut

Children are what parents watched before there was television.
agnut
 

pitw

Gold Member
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Jun 25, 2013
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#58
Just to add to the bartering section. As I've said don't forget the boot. Today I traded a fellow my work with a machine for work with his machine and y boot was that he has to call me when his mother is building pies. The woman makes the best in the world and if I can accidentally show up when they are hot outta the oven she'll watch me eat 1. It ain't all about the money folks.
 

Hystckndle

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#59
Hello, Agnut,
I stopped by a few garage sales on the way back from " this old house " work.
Nothing interesting, kids clothing mostly....nothing my size...lol.
House the sales in your area ? Spider sense says its the season there.
Regards, Haystack
 

agnut

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#60
Hey pitw; that sounds like a delicious idea. The best things in life are free !

The more we barter the more we relate to each other the more we get to know others and ourselves.

Not very personal in going into a store and buying anything. It’s a business; nothing personal and anyone going there for approval won’t find it. I feel that people are fighting the reality of not having enough money in the future. Some are facing the reality begrudgingly and perhaps should instead be rejoicing, for they have been slaves to the system and are now free. They’re going off the reservation as will millions of Americans as they wake up one by one. Store sales are down and that is an indication that folks don’t have the money they did in the past. I read that the velocity of money is about one fourth of what it was in good times. I also read that the FED believes that people are “hoarding” money. Let’s see, are folks putting their money in a hoarding account or a savings account ? They can’t have it both ways. People hold back spending because either they have lost their jobs and/or are worried about the future. And it seems to me that we have many reasons to be worried about the future.

Years ago I saw the change in the type of buyers at garage sales. While before there were fewer buyers with older cars, now I see many buyers with later cars. While I have been doing wise buying all of my life I see others doing the same but out of necessity rather than by choice. For instance I don’t buy a used car unless it can be sold for more than I paid. I may drive this car for a few years then sell it and buy another with the same potential. This way I don’t have to keep adding thousands of dollars every time I buy another car; I just need the initial money from the first car, turning over the same money time after time.

Best wishes,

Agnut
 

pitw

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#61
My favorite auto's are 1980-85 F150's with the 300cid 6 cylinder. We gather them in for $0 to $500 and use them for years and then trade parts or whole vehicles for far more than initial price. I just got a dream truck home that has the 3 in the tree. My 13 year old has fixed the front brakes that made 'er a mite of a touchy drive bringing it 200 miles. He has had more fun this week teaching his older brother and friends how to drive a 3 in tree. The best part of collecting these vehicles of the same vintage and make is that almost all the parts are interchangeable. I've always enjoyed talking with folks who "need" to drive $60,000+ trucks who look down on me but I smile when they make a larger payment every month than I did for the initial/final payment.
This truck cost $300 and it was 6 miles from where I had to deliver a potato planter that I sold for a grand[bought for $200 and used for years]. The back window was $35 and took 5 minutes to put in.




Up here we have to have a safety inspection done on anything over 10 years old to get insurance. I have a mechanic buddy who neeeded firewood for this winter soooooo


It'll get it's inspection and I ain't out nothing but a bit of gas and some time.
 

agnut

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#62
Hello, Agnut,
I stopped by a few garage sales on the way back from " this old house " work.
Nothing interesting, kids clothing mostly....nothing my size...lol.
House the sales in your area ? Spider sense says its the season there.
Regards, Haystack
Hey Haystack. I too hit a few garage sales yesterday. Sorry that you couldn’t score. So let me tell my story; it was a relearning experience for me.

On Thursday I began collecting Craigslist garage sale ads since there are sometimes good sales on Friday morning. But there were none and this was the first time I can recall that there was no action Friday. However there were several sales on Saturday. I copied five or six that had promise. The first one started at 7:00 AM and I was there at 6:55. They had a large side by side drawer Craftsman rolling toolbox. It had been in a fire but was not too bad. He wanted $35; I offered $25 and he took it. You see, my older son is a sort of fanatic with sandpaper and a spray can. Also, I need an extra toolbox for all the tools I keep buying. Maybe a camo paint job would be cool. The overview here is that I need it, the price is cheap, I have an in house painter and I don’t care what it looks like. Oh, and the funny thing is that I was dropping off a dozen boxes of fruits and veggies in the afternoon to a friend with 8 kids and she asked me if I could use some spray paint. She gave me about 15 cans with other items in a large tub for free. Am I beginning to sound like a redneck now ? Good !

The next three sales were a wipeout. Lots of baby clothes and stuff that was ultimately headed to the local dump.

The last sale was close to the sale I was at so I reluctantly headed over there rather than head home. The ad said nothing about what was offered except that it was an estate sale. I had to park up the street and hobbled down there; I was a bit tired by then partly due to lack of adrenaline from the past three sales. My heart leapt when I saw the area of DVDs in the living room. I asked the seller how much he was asking. He responded with “What do you usually pay ?”. I told him that I paid from 50 cents to two dollars knowing that my honesty could cost me plenty. He said that 50 cents would be fine. I looked through the titles and said that I would take them all. There was 113 with some having multiple movies in one case. After loading them into my truck I went back and saw a turkey fryer with the propane unit underneath; it was partially buried behind some tarps in the garage. I asked the price and he said $10; I didn’t even haggle at that price. I also got an almost new Sears battery charger for $10. After I loaded that up I returned and found a new wok and a stainless steel stock pot; I got them for a buck each. The seller even threw in (to boot) an automotive oil drain container, the expensive kind that drains inside with a spout. Perfect, I needed that.

There were also small items I picked up but can’t recall them just now. They are to be added to my stockpile that keeps me from going to the hardware store all the time. You know what I mean.

I went home and unloaded the items while exercising my bragging rights with my sons.

Next I had to pick up the carpenter who is doing a front deck on our house. On the way there I passed acreage properties and saw a tiny garage sale sign. I picked up the carpenter and told him that I wanted to stop by the sale. The directions were almost nonexistent but I wasn’t going to give up and after several wrong turns we found the place. It was a small sale but the one item that caught my eye was a Honda four stroke weedwhacker with a saw blade on it. These are used for brush cutting and I have never seen one offered for sale. This is the perfect tool for cutting out the blackberry bushes and brush that is taking over our property. I had given up finding one years ago but here it was with an extra blade and accessories (to boot). The price said $75 so I asked what their best price was and we agreed on $60.

Now looking back I see that I’ve relearned some lessons. First, get there early. Second, have your route organized and mapped out. Third, don’t get discouraged but rather follow through with your plan. Fourth, even the seemingly unappetizing sale can yield big surprises. Fifth, use your imagination when looking at items for sale. Sixth, your buying day may not be over even if you think it is. And seventh, smell the roses along the way.

If you are becoming discouraged, change your game plan. Go to areas that look promising. Find estate sales. Auctions. Government surplus sales. Keep your ears open and ask questions. Keep notes to call later. Remember, this is a your business and it takes some thought and planning. And that’s the way you would want it anyway, right ?

Best wishes,

Agnut
 

agnut

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#64
Thanks for the photos Pitw. Damn boy ! You must have some redneck blood in you too. High praise indeedydoo.

I love older cars; they are so simple to maintain and with having a few junkers out back you can have parts and trading material for what you might need. Those old Ford trucks are tough and reliable. Also the beat up ones you don’t have to worry about totaling them because the parts are probably worth more than you paid for the truck in the first place. A win win all around.

I bought my 1990 Dodge with the Cummins diesel for $2,600 and I could sell it for twice that with no problem. Even if I wrapped it around a telephone pole, I could sell the engine for what I paid for the car. And then there is the 5 speed transmission and many other parts to sell. I heard that the new Dodge Diesel trucks are $60,000 now. Unbelievable.

Got any “Don’t laugh. At least its paid for” bumper stickers ? Not so funny now is it ?

Yeah, I could never understand the desire to have a new car rather than an older car. I go as far back as I want. The 50s and 60s trucks are fun too but I wonder if the parts are getting hard to find. The era you are dealing in is wise in that they are cheap, easy to work on, affordable to both yourself as well as buyers, parts available and practical. That’s future thinking.

I once had an 86 Ford pickup with automatic trans and a small block v8; it was a great truck, never let me down. The stick with a 6 cylinder engine is most suitable for the future with gas prices being what they are and will be. Great trucks for young guys starting out too. A car gets you there but a truck gets you there with all kinds of items plus a trailer if necessary. A car costs money but a truck can make money hauling.

My older son has a transmission shop and specializes in Toyota manual transmissions. He has three Supra turbo cars and is thinking about picking up a fourth by next week. I have been encouraging him to continue finding more of these cars since they are desirable and collectable for the future. They have 230 HP stock and some build their engines up to over 1,000 HP. So there is a following worldwide. Even stock the Toyota Supra turbos are fast and handle like a race car. I just came back from driving it for the first time and I can tell you that it is an amazing vehicle. I’m really impressed by the engineering that was put into them. They can easily be pumped up to 400 HP without much cost, which would be a hairy ride indeed. Nothin’ like blowing the doors off a Corvette with a Toyota.

Point is, my son has found his niche and is now in piggy heaven. I used to say to find your niche and scratch it until it bleeds money. Look, we are in a depression and still there are opportunities out there. Not everyone was broke during the last depression; in fact I read that there were more millionaires made then than at any other time.

In the 1963 Henry Fonda movie Spencer’s Mountain, a line that stuck with me was “The world stands aside for a man who knows where he is going”. Poetic. I recommend the movie highly.

We should seek to be inspired by a dream and make it a reality. Twice lately I have heard of people who had a business, closed it and settled for a steady paycheck. To me, that is a move backward although often necessary these days. Being an employee is only as secure as the man directly above you. Being self employed, you cannot be fired or laid off but rather have the power to change direction and move on to better things.

The beauty of bartering and horse trading is that you can immerse yourself as much as you desire. Everyone has a comfort zone and some will dabble while others will throw everything they have at the possibilities. I’m 67 and am pacing myself to my needs as well as my energy level. Most of you are younger and all I can say is to gather ye roses while ye may. There is a tradeoff in being older and trading in that hopefully one has learned as to what is valuable, what is a bargain, how much physical work and money is involved and one’s limits. By the time you get to my age you should be able to sit upon a pile of experience as well as a pile of assets, the best of which are between your ears. Something to pass on to your loved ones while you are here as well as the hereafter.

Haystack has shared his knowledge with his daughter and now she is on the path to having control of her finances and life. Long ago I wrote that this bartering and horse trading is life changing stuff. I wasn’t exaggerating or kidding, was I ?

Best wishes,

Agnut

The emperor has no clothes…

Will a day come when the race will detect the funniness of these juvenilities and laugh at them--and by laughing at them destroy them? For your race, in its poverty, has unquestionably one really effective weapon--laughter. Power, Money, Persuasion, Supplication, Persecution--these can lift at a colossal humbug,--push it a little-- crowd it a little--weaken it a little, century by century: but only Laughter can blow it to rags and atoms at a blast. Against the assault of Laughter nothing can stand.
- "The Chronicle of Young Satan," Mysterious Stranger Manuscripts Mark Twain
 

pitw

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#65
Sometimes you ain't sure why you traded. I was at a fellows place who wanted e to do a small job that would have netted me maybe $1,000 and while he was gathering the chemical I spied this in his shed.






Seems he had even used this thing when he worked the RR years ago. This fellow never lets go of anything and when I suggested I take the speeder over cash he agreed. Wife isn't talking cause I think she's speechless with happiness. I have a short spur line of 5 miles that never gets used 7 miles from home and plan on testing her out next summer. I got's a notion marketed right I might make a gold ounce or two.
 

glockngold

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#66
Wife isn't talking cause I think she's speechless with happiness.
Ha! Tell her that when you sell it, you'll get her a nice gas powered wringer washer with the profits. She'll be lovin you for sure.

I have a friend that makes his money twice a year selling at some fancy car show. He specializes in mechanical vending machines 50s era.
He recently restored a carnival ride that netted $30K
I'm sure someone wants that train goober in their rec room, or restaurant/bar.
 
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agnut

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#67
Hi pitw. You sure got a conversation piece there. I am also speechless.

Today is Friday and I had been looking at the Craigslist garage sale ads since Wednesday. Nothin’ to get excited about. However the local paper had about four ads that looked promising. One was an estate sale that I focused on. It started at 8:00 and I was there 15 minutes early. The ad said no early birds. Yeah, right; the buyers were already going through all the goodies when I got there. With no time to lose I greeted the sellers and began sizing up the sale. There were a few tents set up outside with tables covered with items and a double car garage full of items stacked everywhere. I began by spotting an item and asked the price. I said I will take it and set the item aside away from the sale. I told the sellers that I would be making a pile of items I would be buying so that other buyers wouldn’t pick up my items. This doesn’t usually work perfectly and I have to keep an eye on my pile of items as I am picking up other goodies.

There was so much for sale that it was overwhelming and there were many boxes of items that hadn’t even been opened by the time I was finished three hours later. Woah, three hours later ? What were you doing agnut, napping under a tree ? After talking to the sellers who, by the way, were wonderful people I sized up the situation. The father had passed on and two related families wanted to clear out the house as well as their own excess items so that they could move back to their home on a Pacific island. Time was of the essence and much hadn’t even been unboxed yet.

Here is most of what I got :

2 Coach purses w/matching wallets $45 total
1 Prada purse with matching wallet $25
1 8” alabaster vase and stand $2
1 gloom chaser $2
2 large area rugs $5 each
1 outdoor carpet $2
4 plastic trashcans w/wheels $2 each
1 new WIFI in box $2
1 Yamaha flute free (was in the free pile)
2 lawn furniture recliner chairs $5 each
4 jazz albums 50 cents each
1 set 16 piece Milwaukee hole saw set from 5” on down $5
5 metal cutting wheels $2 total
1 old Black and Decker ½” drill $5
1 new Black and Decker orbital polisher $4
8 large potting containers 50 cents to $1 each
1 box of tooling, drill bits, tap and die handles, 3 sharpening stones, 2 Vise Grips, etc $5.
1 two gallon gas can $1

The purses I will either sell on eBay or give them to my daughters and ex for Christmas.

The alabaster vase and stand is an incredible piece of art. I already gave it to a friend who happened to be here this evening. She is a rock hound extraordinaire. I also gave her the gloom chaser.

The area rugs will be used in the house in high traffic areas.

The outdoor carpet will be used to protect the cedar decking that has just been laid out the front door.

The 4 trashcans will be used again and again rather than buying Glad bags all the time.

The WIFI is for a backup.

The Yamaha flute goes to my son if he wants it.

The two recliners will be used on the new front deck as soon as it is finished, hopefully this weekend. These recliners are the expensive kind and I had bought one several weeks ago, tried it and liked it.

The jazz albums are two Stan Getz, a Lionel Hampton, and a double album set of the best of Dave Brubeck. I’ll enjoy them as soon as I get one of my stereo systems set up.

The hole saw set will be for our use and loaning out to friends who will take good care of them.

The metal cutting wheels my older son will be thrilled to have.

The old Black and Decker drill will go in the pile with all the other drills I have collected through the years.

The orbital polisher is a backup,

The potting containers my sons had been asking me to be on the lookout for.

The box of tooling will be added to the loads of other tooling I have accumulated.

I listed the items first and then listed in order what I intend to do with the items. As we are GEM (garage, estate and moving) sailing it would be wise to at least have an inkling of what we are going to later do with these items.

Nobody in their right mind would leave a productive gold mine to go elsewhere and dig another hole in hopes of striking it rich. That is why I didn’t leave the estate sale; it was both productive and a lot of fun.

By the way, I helped one of the sellers move an antique piano and a chest freezer. It seems that few buyers want to get involved in work but I believe that this helping is what can uplift a seller. I don’t do this to get a better deal; it is just courtesy while I am at their property.

When I got home I took a 90 minute nap to be awakened by a couple of friends digging a 3 foot deep hole in my driveway. They were looking for the electric lines so that my backhoe wouldn’t find them the hard way. She was in the hole with a shovel, digging furiously and he was standing nearby supervising. Where can you find a woman like that these days ?

I began digging the 120 foot long drainage trench but it got too dark so I’ll have to continue tomorrow. If you don’t hear from me for a week, I’ll probably be in a trench of my own. With all my hair singed off. An electrifying sendoff. Interesting.

Best wishes,

Agnut
 

pitw

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#68
Sometimes we don't why we help each other but I have helped a fellow who owns a feedlot just because he has some interesting stuff. Last evening I was just sat down to a wood fire cooked rib eye steak when the phone rang. Sam is on the other end and he says, "Bring a gun and knives cause I'm gonna butcher a 1,300 lb steer that just broke his leg". Donny and I were off like a shot cause loosely translated Sammy wanted to give us meat for helping. Donny and I got to ride in the bucket of a very large loader as we made our way through a pen of around 200 big beeves. I ain't never shot a critter from a loader before but with my old .22 it took 1 shot and a quick poke with the knife to bleed it. Sam decided to just take the back straps and hind quarter meat.
What I brought home this morning and turned into steaks, roasts and hamburger.


100 lbs of pure meat that would cost over $500 at a butcher shop and Donny saying, "rednecks have more fun than slicker folks, eh".
 
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pitw

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#69
Wife used up six pounds of the burger.


Beef Stick
5-6lb lean beef
1/4 cup curing salt[tender quick]
1/2 Tbsp dry mustard
1 tsp garlic salt
3 Tbsp liquid smoke
1 1/2 tsp coarse black pepper
3 Tbsp mustard seed
Mix all ingredients together and place in fridge for 48 hours. Shape in rolls 2-3 inch in diameter and place on broiling pan. Bake in oven for 4 hours at 225F.
 

Dude

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#70
Too much tender quick compared to what I've read and use
way too much

iphone
 

agnut

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#71
Great score Pitw. I wonder what the price of meat will be next year. If it goes from $5/lb to $7/lb, you have made an additional 40% from your “investment. Tax free too ! Something to think about. And I really mean that we all should think deeply about the future as to what we will hold in our possession when the day comes that the items we hold will be in great demand.

How about this idea ? Buy a good used electric saw blade sharpener for the power saws. In the future you could have a blade sharpening service for cash or trades. I have an electric chain saw sharpener, a cheapie that I got from Harbor Fright. It was on sale for about $30; so far I’ve sharpened about 30 chains for myself and some friends. It works well and probably will do another 100 or so before it craps out. That is why I try to have a backup for whatever equipment I use regularly as well as ones I am anticipating using for servicing others’ equipment.

I am always looking at what will be needed in a transformed future. I hope we all understand what this future may be like. Gone are the days when folks thought they could afford to throw away dull saw blades and replace them with new blades. Personally I prefer to think in terms of bartering my services for others’ services or items rather than to charge money. I think of money as the weak link in bartering and horse trading because it has been losing value and confidence. Also, trading with another usually results in a happier and more rich deal all around. I can recall giving someone an item I have and their returning the favor in wonderful and unexpected ways.

Also gone are the days when we would buy new jeans or shirts or boots or a myriad of items that wear out through time. In the first place money is tight and in the second place prices are going up. Last Friday I was at the estate sale I posted above and got to talking to a couple of ladies who were the sellers. I told them about the clothes I had on and what they cost. My Phat Farm shoes were free and I just had to put in a set of laces I had laying around, my jeans I had gotten at a bag sale at my favorite thrift store for 30 cents, my shirt was also 30 cents. So I had all of 60 cents tied up in my clothing I was wearing that day. The ladies just sat their with their mouths open and didn’t know what to say. Furthermore I told them that the money I saved could go to other items I needed or to food which is an absolute necessity.

Americans are going to have to wake up to the fact that they cannot continue without using what income they have judiciously. They hit the wall long ago and have been living on borrowed time and money. My quote, “The filthiest four letter word in the English language is debt”, will probably never be often cited but it has been felt painfully for decades and sadly will be the downfall of millions who did not see this coming.

I suspect that at the bottom of all this foolishness is the marketing propaganda as well as the “pride” of buying new items. Isn’t pride one of the 7 deadly sins ? Wrath, greed, sloth, pride, lust, envy and gluttony. Yep, it’s right there in the middle. Hey, if you’re going to have pride, at least have pride in a job well done whether it is your occupation or wise handling of your finances. Being proud of having a “new” car or fancy new clothes appears a bit financially retarded and slothful in my view. But that’s just me.

On the other hand, God bless all the multitude of folks who have been obliviously buying all the “new” merchandise, for without them there wouldn’t be all the used items available at laughably low prices. Just imagine if everyone were clued in to how much they could save. If so, the prices of used items as well as their availability would not be what we see today. Haven’t you noticed some GEM sales asking prices not much below their new prices ? When I see this I leave skid marks on the way to the next sale.

This morning there was only one sale that interested me. It was advertised as a moving sale, everything must go. Imagine a one day only moving sale and on Friday at that ! When most everyone was at work !

When I got there I found out that it was a moving sale alright. The owner had moved on to his final reward. In other words, an estate sale. Lots of stuff in multiple buildings. I began in the house garage where I asked if they had an air compressor. The said that there was one in the workshop building. When I got there I was told that one of the sons had already hauled it away but then I spied a Skil saw worm drive with two blades, one was new. The price was $25 and I didn’t even quibble. While there I saw an industrial pair of grinding wheels for a machine I had at home. I gathered the grinding wheels with a large cup wire wheel and asked the price for all three. He asked what I wanted to pay. From there it was game on. I said five dollars and he agreed. I could have said two or three dollars but here is where generosity pays off. Did I just say generosity ? Or did I really mean instead of grinding the poor seller into the dirt while making myself look like Shylock who, by the way, reminds me of the depraved character on the cover of the Jethro Tull Aqualung LP ?

My point is that there is a low limit offered price from the buyer which should not be crossed. It is what I call the insult line. The three items for $5 would cost over $50 plus tax new. And all three items happened to be never used. I find this to occur at some estate sales wherein the owner passed on before he could get the items out of the package. Maybe worrying about how to pay for these items gave him a heart attack in the first place (or was that the last place ?). Death by debt.

When I got finished in the workshop I returned to the house garage where I zeroed in on the 150 or so DVDs laid out in boxes. The price was $1.50 each or $1 when buying 10 or more. I asked how much the season sets were and they said that they were also a dollar each. I was a bit in shock since even the thrift stores sell these sets for $10 to $15. I got the first four seasons of “House” for a dollar each, all 5 seasons of “Ghost Whisperer” for a dollar each and the 5 seasons of “Supernatural”(36 discs) for a dollar total. I was almost embarrassed but the seller had set the price and I have a rule to not bid the price up against myself. Otherwise the estate sale police could show up and put me in the strait jacket we all subconsciously worry about lurking out there in the nether lands, just waiting for one of us to make a serious lapse in judgment.

After paying for the 60 DVDs I realized that I had made a potentially expensive mistake; I had not looked through the house garage before going to the workshop building. Not even a cursory look. I was only then aware of how unaware I had been previously because I had not seen the DVDs or the second Skil worm drive saw with 4 blades (one new in the package) offered for $10. I was both happy and surprised that someone had not picked it up. It was a steal. I’m relating this to show you that even though I can be oblivious at times, I still come out smelling like a rose. This has happened too many times to ignore in that I conclude that there is so much room for error and sloppiness (that’s me) that anyone who can fog up a mirror and has a great desire can succeed beyond their wildest dreams.

Yesterday a friend was over and needed a large pot for cooking up canning fruits and veggies. I gave her one realizing that that was the only one I had even though I didn’t do any canning. I had gotten it years ago because it was dirt cheap. Today I got a large pot for $3 like the one I had given away yesterday. This too happens from time to time. I guess it is part of the bartering and horse trading lifestyle. There is a rhythm, a flow to go with as we are pursuing our deals. And when we are in that groove we are along for the ride. Pretty cool, and after all the years I have been doing this I have only recently taken note of this phenomenon.

God is a comedian playing to an audience that is too afraid to laugh.
Voltaire

Best wishes,

Agnut

P.S. Last post I was digging out the 120 foot long drainage trench while worrying about hitting the 220v electric line. I never hit the electric or water lines but I did find the sewage line. It was only by sheer dumb luck that the backhoe teeth scraped the dirt clear on top of the sewage pipe and didn‘t break the pipe. I can only compare it to a blind dinosaur using his teeth to pick a feather off a bird’s tail without hurting the bird.

Of course, the bird isn’t full of shit like I am sometimes.
 

Hystckndle

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#72
Yo Agnut,
Missed talking to ya this week.
Was in " hot pursuit " of a fe things Bufford T Pusser style.
One of these, I will be thrilled to report here as soon as I consumate the deal.
On the road now....Vic
 

pitw

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#73
Too much tender quick compared to what I've read and use
way too much

iphone
Where did you read too much? Been using that recipe for 20 years and ain't died yet.
 

Dude

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#74
Where did you read too much? Been using that recipe for 20 years and ain't died yet.
Learn something new everyday. I thought Insta cure was the same as TC. It's used in the same fashion, but you need 12 times more TC because it's cut with so much salt.
Insta Cure™ No. 1, a basic cure used to cure all meats that require cooking, brining, smoking, or canning. This includes poultry, fish, ham, bacon, luncheon meats, corned beef, pates and other products too numerous to mention. Formerly Prague Powder #1. Insta Cure™ #1 contains salt and sodium nitrite (6.25%).
Use 1 level teaspoon per 5 lbs. ground meat. 4 oz. of Insta Cure™ will process approximately 120 lbs. of meat.
 

Hystckndle

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#75
Number one rule in horse trading is to always get boot. You can always trade the boot up to make for any screw ups in the initial trade.

So.....the guy I am working on a trade with that I alluded to above, comes over this rainy afternoon.
I am like, hey man, ya know I also have this van maybe we can throw into the mix.
( Its a 1995 Nissan Quest van I have obtained for little cost from a family member)
Anyways, we are checking it out and we pop the hood.
Check it out....
I let out a bit of a suprised yelp....James says " dude....what up !? "....
I put my hand on his shoulder, and I looked square into his eyes....
And I said...." have you ever got BOOT from any trade "...
' nuff said....
:cheerful::beer1::cry1:
 

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pitw

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#76
Not quite what I had in mind but whatever works.
 

Hystckndle

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#77
Not quite what I had in mind but whatever works.
Roger on that, it was just the very first thing I thought of... :)
Since you had been so kind to discuss it here up above...
Certainly not making light of your tactic or procedure, just employing and engaging what you have shared.
Although I guess applied in reverse...point is, we had a laugh and he wound up sweetening the transaction
we are going to make this week and I am pretty happy about that.
And come to think of it , is that where the phrase " to boot "
comes from ?..from trading etc ??....I would think so, except here, I have not heard that since I lived at the family farm.
Left the hood up here over the night, hopefully the little guy hits the trail and goes somewheres else.
Regardless, I was able to share a bit about GIM with my buddy and neighbor James and talk a little strategy about trading and life..
Regards Pitw, " whatever works " is exactly what is " in the works "
Talk to you a little later.
Haystack
 

pitw

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#78
Sometimes you gotta look at stuff with a plan.

Well I got my two miles of fence posts pounded and 1/2 mile of old fence removed with new fence replacing it yesterday so I have time today to get back into bartering. Over a month ago on a one day garage sale drive Donny and I came upon an older couple selling their stuff to move to BC. While perusing their wares I came upon this box.


Now remember this couple were in mid to late 70's and I grinned. I asked to look in the box and the old girl[the old boy grabbed my kid and got outta dodge before he got red too] said,"No" that I would buy it sight unseen. She said it had videos and Playboys in it. I instantly thought what a great bartering item for some hutterites I know. I told her my plan and she doubled the price from $10 to $20 because she said I would make out good. I asked what the hell she was doing with them and her reply had me slapping my knees, "We ain't dead". So I asked why sell them to which she replied,"we got a DVD player" and it was my turn to change shades. I opened the box minutes ago to see what I had minutes ago.



I figure to trade for them skinning and stretching 15 coyotes which they'd normally charge $150. I'll let you know the outcome.
 

agnut

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#79
Geez Hystckndle, that there is one heckuva redneck car alarm (unless he plays possum). And much less messy than the 12 gauge shell under the horn button. Kudos !

And an addition to your preps too. Yew got a recipe for possum stew ?

Long ago I had a Chevy one ton crew cab with a huge rat living under the dashboard. My nephew got in and sat down. Just then the rat ran over his feet, stopped and looked directly at him as if to say “What ?” and then climbed back under the dash. After all these years we still laugh about that. Simple minds are easily amused.

Boot. Booty ? Is that somehow related to booty call; reminds me of junk in the trunk since the Brits call the trunk the boot. See how I connect ? Probably better if you don’t venture there.

Pirate goods are called booty. Perhaps they have bypassed making a deal and just went for the “boot” solely.

How did your neighbor James take your shared GIM trading and lifestyle ? Sometimes something as simple as a few sentences can open a door and change a life. I wonder when we American patriots will realize that we are all in this together and begin to think and work as a team. “What the hell is the matter with you people ?” keeps coming to mind. I have noticed that folks I talk to are more receptive that they were a few years ago. It is a sad phenomenon that those of us who talk to others about prepping and what the future holds in store are written off as paranoids until things reach crisis proportions. And then people begin to open up to the possibilities like they had discovered them on their own. I guess the reward is to watch these newly awakened folks as they mull through what has been going on in the past and connect to the present situation, then extrapolating to what the future portends under these new revelations. That is mind changing stuff, a more rare occurrence that you would think.

I thought I was through for the weekend with Friday’s estate sale booty but I was wrong. Yesterday I saw one garage sale that was about 20 minutes away. It was a real London fog out there so I put on my jacket of the same name and sallied forth (too gay ?). I couldn’t get the windshield cleared for the first 5 miles or so. The place was tucked away in a relatively unpopulated wooded area. I even got lost and had to backtrack; The map wasn’t clear; yeah, I’ll blame it on the mapmaker, that’s the ticket.

When I drove up, the house garage was open with tables set up with lots of various items.
The barn to the left was also open and laid out with many items. I spoke to the husband seller a bit and asked him about a few items. As usual, these sellers are really nice people who have opened up their homes to virtual strangers. It doesn’t matter whether they are selling out of too much stuff syndrome or out of financial desperation, they are the sellers and are anticipating your buying some items and saving them from having to take a trip to the dump or poorhouse ( which is also a dump).

The first thing I saw was a 50’ long heavy nylon strap used for pulling down cut trees in the right direction. It was a dollar. This is something I need for taking down the many Alder trees around the property. A score even if I had found nothing else.

A come along winch for $5
A trailer hitch with ball for $2
A large ice chest for $1
2 Tupperware bowls with lids for 50 cents each
A Stihl chain saw case for $1
Ace bandages, knee, elbow braces, 9 pieces for free
2 gallon gas can for $1
Sears sandblaster on wheels with hoses for $10
4 LP records for $1.50
Jasper and obsidian stones for free
A bag of home grown zucchini and carrots for free

Sometimes we come away from a sale with what looks to be a small haul but when examining each item we realize that they fulfill a need. And the retail price is many multiples of what we paid. But there is more to it here. What would it take for us to buy these items ? The hours spent in finding them as well as the traveling time, the gas and wear and tear on our car, our research as to who has the right size and style we want. It is deceiving unless we sit back and reflect the totality of the effort and expense required. Our time is most precious, more precious to me as I become older. You younger readers probably give little thought of the value of your waking hours. I know, I did when I was young. To me, it is a matter of perspective and balancing my time with my objectives.

Now the items listed above may not seem like much but, as I posted recently, I am giving the uses I have in order to show you why I buy these items.

The heavy nylon strap was dirt cheap in the first place but I got it home and used it the same day for pulling some logs out of the woods. This week I intend to use the strap for tree logging. The dead Alder will be needed for firewood for this winter which may be a long and cold one according to reports I’ve read.

The come along winch will be used for pulling cars onto a car dolly. Much safer and easier than finding four strapping young men to push the car.

The trailer hitch with ball is offset and will correct my trailer fore and aft balance.

The large ice chest was only a buck; what can I say ?

I collect Tupperware for the future storage needs and trading. This is the only brand I buy.

The Stihl chain saw case will protect one of my Stihl saws when transporting.

The Ace bandages will be most appreciated here on the ache-r-age.

The 2 gallon gas can is now part of my vast gas can collection, both for use and trade.

Just last week my older son and I were discussing the needs for a sandblaster. The seller didn’t have his displayed for sale but he asked me out of the blue if I would be interested. He took me into his woodworking shop and pulled it out of the corner. I had neglected to ask him what else he might have for sale but he preemptively brought up the subject. Now looking back, that was a odd way of procuring an item I wanted and needed. I had asked if he had an air compressor, that may have set him off. I will never know.

The 4 LP records. George Benson, Neil Diamond and Blood Sweat and Tears albums were in pristine condition. They may be duplicates to my collection but at under 50 cents a record they seemed a pity to pass up. I have been collecting since the 60s and finding an unscratched album is becoming harder to find as time passes. They are like classic books, sometimes rare but often flawed through neglect. So I pick these records up for my enjoyment, trade or gifting.

The jasper stone is of my birth month and I keep it in the windowsill to look at it. Beautiful piece of nature’s art. The obsidian will go to a friend who also collects rocks.

The home grown zucchini and carrots went into a veggie stew with jalapenos, tumeric and several other ingredients. Just a fond gustatory memory now.

Now what if I had said to myself that early Saturday morning that I would instead watch the TV or wander around the property ? I would have missed out on the adventure and rewards that sometimes cannot be quantified.

Today there are many thrill seekers who do some wild and dangerous sports. I’ve gone hang gliding, sailplane, flown small planes, surfed, scuba dived and traveled around quite a lot in my younger years. While they were all fun, they also cost lots of money.

Orson Wells once said that if he had a hobby that did not bring him money, he would find another hobby.

My hobby is bartering and horse trading; it brings me so much more than money that it is impossible to convey. This is why I write to encourage others to join me in this world of its own.

And in closing, I would like to say that your bartering and horse trading abilities will become a most valuable asset when this fiat paper currency collapses. Fiat currency represents value only in the minds of the citizenry. When their minds change, lookout !

Buying at retail is for those who lack imagination.

Best wishes,

Agnut


It was in the early days of the settlement of the Pilgrims when the Indian chief said to the settlers that they were welcome to the bounty of this new America. When asked what the settlers thought about the Indians, the leader said “We have our reservations”. That answer wasn’t fully understood for hundreds of years.
 

Hystckndle

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#80
Hello Agnut and Pitw.
Good stuff ! Will edit this post and reply further.
Regards,

Edit # 1 to ADD:

PITW,
That is some interesting trade goods. And I will not bet against you finding a better trade for them. !!

I worked with a guy who through some very opportune circumstances acquired a house that he renovated and sold just before the crash. When he first told me about where it was I had that dog head tilted look back at him as I was realizing it was just around the corner from me.
In one of the closets there he found a very large stash ( cache , LOL ) of gay oriented magazines from the 70s and 80s. When he mentioned it to me I was quick to ask what had become of them. He said that one of the very first things he had taken to the curb for garbage pick up were those items. I lamented long and hard to him about how , especially because of the age and condition, they could be used in the future or maybe checked for collectability for sale on Ebay. He just shook his head and said if the opportunity repeated itself he would do the same thing…trash them. I will never forget that.

Now, as long as you have turned the conversation to “ erotica “ ...I will share this with you. A little over 10 years ago I traveled frequently with a group of friends. One of the things I really enjoyed doing was going to the markets in towns in Ecuador, Peru and Guatemala. I picked up a tip from someone and I thought I would try it.
Thought it was crazy until the first time I ( reluctantly ) tried it. Now I am a believer x 1000.
The day before departure I went to the local Kmart and I bought a variety of women’s lace underwear, packed it with my things and took it with. Note: !!! that my FIRST hurdle was getting over the look at the check out counter here at Walmart….” Ohhh…those are for me, red is my favorite of these colors though ! “ was almost impossible to say with a straight face. The SECOND hurdle was the customs check in Quito Ecuador. I just kept quiet and stared at the floor. Being cleared of all ( as I am typing this I am questioning my sanity BTW ) of that I was on my way. Open range, blue sky ahead.
So what happens is this…ya see goods like that are a premium in little small towns in many countries. We might take what we have for granted but many there surely do not. So Haystack travels the market and decides on what his target pieces are….Alpaca rug, water color artwork, whatever…I reach a bartering deal that is a definite NO for each party. Many many times it is the male vendor who is there pressing the deal and the woman is sitting in the back of the space or to the side knitting or weaving, something of that nature. It is just about the shaking the head and wringing of the hands and walking away time that Haystack pulls from his small pack a few delicate ( Kmart mind you, the degree of delicacy may be debatable ) items of womens apparel to throw into the mix . PITW, lemme tell ya brother, there are a few small shop owner guys in South and Central America that STILL have blue ribs from the jab they received from the nearby wife and the “ YES “ nod when those items are introduced into the negotiating arena.
True story, lots of fun was had….and some good trades were made.
Regards PITW, will respond to Agnut here soon.
 
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