• "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding metals, finance, politics, government and many other topics"

Bartering And Horse Trading

pitw

Gold Chaser
Midas Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
3,789
Likes
4,831
Location
Eastern Alberta.
Anybody got any trading plans for the weekend ?
I'm gonna go hunting and fishing if a trade shows it's ugly head you can be sure I'll try and nail it. Speaking of which this week I met up with a couple young guys who had 3 coyotes in their truck. I asked what they were gonna do with them and got the answer, "Sell if anyone will buy". I offered them $20 which they jumped on and I took the frozen coyotes to a fur buyer friend[I didn't want to thaw out coyotes for skinning that I knew not the damage] and got $30 each for them. $100 for knowing something ain't bad.
 

pitw

Gold Chaser
Midas Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
3,789
Likes
4,831
Location
Eastern Alberta.
Another thing about horse trading is to know where a good sale can take place. When I go hunting camp Wainwright for primitive season I take one of my fishing box's full of nipples, wrench's, powder, balls and such. You'd be amazed how many $4 nipples I've sold for $25, caps and consumables go at 8x face value as these guys need them now. They hate me but pay me.LOL
 

pitw

Gold Chaser
Midas Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
3,789
Likes
4,831
Location
Eastern Alberta.
It lives.
[video=youtube_share;2jqYDIHNuQI]http://youtu.be/2jqYDIHNuQI[/video]
Now I'm kinda/sorta sad to see it go. That was a fun project that taught me a few things I never knew.
 

agnut

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
122
Likes
403
Hi pitw. Yeah, when selling or buying items we never know who we are dealing with unless we spend/invest the time to get to know them. I treat people I deal with like friends first and then go on to discuss our mutual interests which could be about anything. We eventually get around to what they are selling or buying. I have many contacts for later when something they were interested in pops up. The profit we seek comes in various forms; it’s not all about money.

Your taking the time to help this buyer with paint spraying advice is a great example of the way we should go about dealing with others. It is secondary that we negotiate a deal with them; what is most important is that we do all we can to help them and make a connection of trust and caring. People cannot fake this and get away with it. It must be genuine. With this attitude deals will happen; we don’t have to be concerned. What we put out there comes back. It’s karma.

I recall someone telling me a bit of wisdom 40 years ago. He said that your success in life is predicated upon how well you communicate with others.

Best wishes,

Agnut

"To laugh often and much; to win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children; to earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends; to appreciate beauty, to find the best in others; to leave the world a little better; whether by a healthy child, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is the meaning of success. "
 

agnut

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
122
Likes
403
Thanks Fatboy. Your post was so close to what I write about that I felt like I had experienced it in the past. I have been writing about how I focus on estate sales and moving sales. They both can be goldmines. Not so much the garage sales but I go anyway to pick up odds and ends. Really, you never know; there are no hard and fast rules for where we will find a treasure. So keep an open mind as to the possibilities.

After the 2007-8 market crash I noted that I was beginning to see more garage sale interest and attendance from folks that had newer cars and were well dressed. And it is still this way. The what I call more financially set folks still miss many bargains, I think because they still have a mindset of looking for pristine items rather than items that may be serviceable but either need work or are scuffed here and there. They haven’t gotten the message that our world has transitioned from form to function. What is functional has always been the key. Probably has something to do with imagination too.

This bartering and horse trading thread can sometimes be overwhelming what with the members posting so much of their own experiences. Please keep it up ! I will post as I can and hope that y’all will understand that I’m in the middle of organizing and setting up many of the items I have gotten in the past. I sent photos of some of the stuff I have to Haystackneedle but haven’t heard back yet. He is probably still laughing at the enormity as well as the disorganization.

Buying and selling can be seasonal wherein we hole up until the spring when the sales come out of the woodworks or we can redouble our efforts to find as many estate sales as time permits. By doing this over the winter and spring we can have our estate sale connections ready as an additional source of deals when there is a lull in the garage and moving sale ads. Or perhaps better to focus only on estate sales if there is enough to keep you busy. People pass on and downsize throughout the year. You may have to travel farther but I believe that the rewards will be greater.

Gotta go and hook up the 5 channel stereo system. Ridiculous that I have 3,000 LP record albums and nothing to play them on.

Best wishes,

Agnut

"The trick is in what one emphasizes. We either make ourselves miserable, or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same." - Carlos Castaneda
 

pitw

Gold Chaser
Midas Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
3,789
Likes
4,831
Location
Eastern Alberta.
agnut it actually agriculture field spraying we were discussing but other than that you are spot on.
 

Hystckndle

SWEATEQUITYIS$$$
Site Mgr
Midas Supporter ++
GIM Hall Of Fame
Joined
Mar 28, 2010
Messages
8,233
Likes
10,519
Location
Central Florida
Yo !, I aint laughing....I am compiling my photos to send you tomorrow in rebuttal....
I showed them ( your pics ) to my wife last night at dinner and she said,
" good God !, you and Agnut were separated at birth ! "
 

Merkin

Seeker
Seeker
Joined
Apr 2, 2010
Messages
234
Likes
178
'Horse trading' has gotten so much easier and abundant because of craigslist. I used to scour the classifieds and beat the back alleys to find deals, but now I search craigslist. He's a tip for searching the entire US on craigslist - type in the item you are interested in followed by site:craigslist.org
About ten years ago I found doors on CL that look just like these, supposedly from the first territorial governor of Louisiana's Mansion. They're 4" thick made of Cuban Mahogany. Was building a new home in Arizona until our savings went away. We're fortunate we had vested in pretty nice real estate and were able to survive. We did not however, build the new home. I'll barter the doors if there is interest. BTW - I tried the search and got no where.
 

pitw

Gold Chaser
Midas Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
3,789
Likes
4,831
Location
Eastern Alberta.
Horse trading can also be more fun than should be legal and rent comes into play too. I was thinking of this thread yesterday when I remembered last year[I was shoveling out of a drift while I was thinking LOL] and how I happened across a fellow who had drove over a small rise into 4 foot of snow. This was about 5 miles out in a pasture where a person wouldn't be found unless it was by a local. The fellow was more round than tall about 40ish in a brand new truck. He was happy to see me for a minute there but that changed with some of my responses. He insisted that I pull him out which I informed him wasn't happening cause I wasn't getting stuck to save his sorry butt. The fact he insisted didn't sit well to start with as his hands told me a story about what he did for a living. I said he could shovel himself out in 15 minutes which was quite possible but he infored me he had no shovel either. That made me grin and say that I had one cause only a fool would travel without one. He offered to buy mine but I said did you miss the part about a fool. He wanted to borrow my shovel but I figured he needed to pay for his indiscretions so I offered to rent my shovel for $20. Now he was down right miffed so I started walking to my truck and he wasn't as slow as I thought cause he quickly handed me a $20 bill. I watched and gave advice for 45 minutes on which end of a shovel actually would work best. He got the snow removed from under the truck and I suggested he shovel more from in front as it was easier without a truck sitting on it but what do I know. He promptly drove into the deep stuff again and was stuck again. After an hour he got it out and was such a smuck that he never even thanked me for the use of my shovel. I like helping people.
 

agnut

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
122
Likes
403
I LOVE Thrift stores.

http://www.timebomb2000.com/vb/showthread.php?459875-I-LOVE-Thrift-stores.&

Great overview; note post #6 by Doc1.

Life changing stuff ? You betcha !

Best wishes,

Agnut

We have done so much, with so little, for so long....We can now do anything, with nothing, forever.

"Nobody knows when reality will overtake the rhetoric, lies, phony statistics, wishful thinking, fake prices and tiresome poseurs pretending to be world leaders. The situation is universal, a consequence of terrible leaders and careless (or clueless) citizenry."
-Paul Singer
 

90%RealMoney

Midas Member
Midas Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2011
Messages
4,806
Likes
4,049
Location
Left Flank, Oceana...Locked and Loaded!
If you guys run across ANY old vintage BELL helmets, scoop them up. Especially one of these baby's, a "MINI MOTO" children's MX helmet. I bought this helmet today at a Thrift store for $8.50, cleaned and waxed the exterior, and put it on Ebay. Sold it for $500.00 in less than an hour! I had seen a similar one go for $600.00 6 months ago or so.
 

Attachments

glockngold

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
3,589
Likes
4,875

90%RealMoney

Midas Member
Midas Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2011
Messages
4,806
Likes
4,049
Location
Left Flank, Oceana...Locked and Loaded!
I'm not an expert, but the Mini Moto is the really desired one. The second helmet you listed may be worth a shot, looks like a real old original Star. It's missing the shield. I also sold an older Simpson "Darth Vader" type helmet in like 11 minutes on Ebay for 180.00. Only to realize I probably could have gotten double that. Both helmets were bought by Asians down in the Los Angeles area. I'm guessing they are going to collectors overseas. That first helmet is nothing special apparently. If it were a 70's model and in better condition maybe, I think there's alot of luck involved as well. The right buyer is absolutely the key. I'll adjust my original statement and say look for a mini moto helmet. Certain memorabilia seems to be hot. As far as dates go, on the chin strap of Bell helmets, the year will be stamped on the leather. The Simpson Darth Vader type helmet was always popular, and isn't produced in the same way anymore. A good example of one of those is a no brainer. I wouldn't spend a lot of time searching, just another thing to be on the lookout for, if it comes your way. Now Mountain Man, that guy has more jackpot stories than B&M has baked beans.
 
Last edited:

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Sr Site Supporter
Mother Lode
GIM Hall Of Fame
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
73,083
Likes
34,633
It is Never Too Late to Embrace Personal Austerity


December 5, 2014


Whenever my travels take me to the Seattle area, I am amazed at the extent of conspicuous consumption. The fancy cars, the filled-to-the-brim shopping bags, and the crammed-to-the-gills restaurants are always a surprise. Perhaps I have lived in a rural community too long but when whenever I see this, my first thought turns to wondering whether these city folks have a clue about living simply and being prepared.

Do they have a rainy day fund? Do they have stored food? Do they have skills to survive without a job or a government hand-out if the worse were to happen?





It has been a long time since I have written about financial preparedness so I thought today would be a good time to revisit this all-important topic. One of the better preparedness authors out there is my blogging colleague, Daisy Luther. You may also know her as the Organic Prepper.

Daisy often echoes my own sentiments when it comes of living a self-sufficient and self-reliant life. Today I share her thoughts on personal austerity along with 12 ways to cut expenses. This is her story, based upon personal experience. She has and is walking the walk.


Personal Austerity: 12 Ways to Radically Cut Your Expenses

How often do you hear people talk about how they would live their dreams if they only had a bit more money? People always dream about moving to a remote area or about staying home with the kids or about relocating to the bug out location, but often feel that these things are financially unreachable. Do you do this yourself?

If so, then maybe it’s time to take a good hard look at your personal finances and enact a personal austerity plan. Most people would be surprised at the changes that can be made when they rethink the definition of the word “necessities”.

aus·tere


[aw-steer] adjective


1. severe in manner or appearance; uncompromising; strict; forbidding.
2. rigorously self-disciplined and severely moral; ascetic; abstinent
3. grave; sober; solemn; serious.
4. without excess, luxury, or ease; limited; severe.
5. severely simple; without ornament; lacking softness; hard


With the gloomy economic forecast, it’s not reasonable or rational to expect things to improve in the near future. If you want to be somewhat immune to the financial difficulties coming down the pipe, you need to perform a financial makeover to pare down the monthly output to the bare minimum.

Does this sound kind of grim? It’s not – decreasing your monthly output provides a different kind of safety net. You can end (or at least reduce) your slavery to the system, where the government helps itself to at least 30% of your paycheck through payroll deductions. With your newfound freedom, you may discover that you have the money to start a business, relocate, or cut back your work hours to spend more time doing the important things in life.

Devastating financial changes are coming to a location near you. Wouldn’t you prefer to make the cuts now and adjust accordingly, instead of having them forced upon you through evictions, foreclosures, repossessions, and other painful methods?


Redefining necessities

If your finances are out of control, the best possible reality check is a stark look at what necessities really are. It is not necessary to life to have an iPhone, a vehicle in both stalls of your two-car garage, or for your children to all have separate bedrooms. People in Southern and Eastern Europe right now will tell you, as they scramble for food, basic over the counter medications like aspirin, and shelter, that necessities are those things essential to life:



  • Water
  • Food (and the ability to cook it)
  • Medicine and medical supplies
  • Basic hygiene supplies
  • Shelter (including sanitation, lights, heat)
  • Simple tools
  • Seeds
  • Defense Items



Absolutely everything above those basic necessities is a luxury. So, by this definition, what luxuries do you have?

Some are more important than others, based on your lifestyle, and might be considered secondary necessities. You might require transportation, work clothing, a computer and an internet connection, electrical appliances, a cell phone – you are the only person who can define which are these are luxuries and which are secondary necessities. It’s essential to be truly honest with yourself and separate “wants” and “I really enjoy having this” and “the kids will complain without it” from “needs”

For example, I am a freelance writer who lives in a remote area. Without an internet connection and a laptop, I have no work. For me to make a living, therefore, my computer and monthly internet bill are a necessity. However, because I work from home, a fashionable work wardrobe is not important to me. I can wear jeans and a t-shirt to work every single day, and it won’t affect my career at all. If you have to go out to a job in customer service, for example, then perhaps a computer and internet connection would be less important than a good-looking career wardrobe.



My Personal Austerity Plan

A couple of years ago, I began to see the writing on the wall for my own personal finances. I’m a single mom and my former husband is deceased, so there is no child support coming in. So as far as raising these children goes, I’m the only game in town. I realized that the industry I had been working in for many years was very shaky (automotive) and that I’d better get my financial house in order.

I began to cut expenses as quickly as possible. I was making a very good income and our lifestyle had “improved” with each pay raise and promotion. Although these changes were not incredibly popular with the kiddos, I made them ruthlessly. I made the following adjustments:



  • Moved from a 4 bedroom home to a small 2 bedroom
  • Cut cable and home phone
  • Began providing a limited budget to the kids for school clothes, winter coats, and holiday gifts. If something “better” was wanted, the difference had to be earned
  • Made the kids do extra chores for privileges like field trips, vacations, and houseguests
  • Began cooking entirely from scratch and limiting meals out to birthdays or long trips
  • Got rid of the current model year car and got an older, more affordable vehicle
  • Began gardening, preserving bulk foods, and shopping through mail order sources



These efforts paid off within a few months, because my prediction was right – I got downsized. Had my expenses been at their former level, we would have struggled to keep the electricity on and food in the cupboards.

When I lost my job, I began looking for ways to make money from home. I was fortunate and picked up some freelance jobs pretty shortly, but I realized that I couldn’t make ends meet with what I was making, at least not in my then-current location.

So, I began a search for a less expensive place to live. The beauty of what I do for a living is that I can live anywhere – I only require a reliable connection to the internet. Within a few months, we’d located a very distant, very remote little cabin in the North Woods. We sold a bunch of stuff and then packed up the rest and moved 7 hours north to the boondocks, a move that saved over $1100 per month when compared to city life.



Get a Picture of Where you Are, Right Now

I realize that the changes I made are not changes that will work for everybody. I’m not suggesting the changes are a whole lot of fun either. Adjusting your own situation requires a brutal analysis of your expenditures. If you can’t get your partner or spouse on board, it’s all but impossible to do a complete overhaul. Kids, however, have to deal with it – expect loud complaints but be firm.

Print off your bank account statements for the past 2 months. On a piece of paper, track where your money is going. List the following:




Rent/Mortgage
Utilities
Car payments
Vehicle operating expenses (fuel, repairs)
Insurances
Credit card and other debt payments
Telephone/Cell phone
Cable/Satellite
Internet
Extracurricular activities for the kids
Extracurricular activities for the adults
Dining out
Groceries
School expenses
Clothing
Recreational spending
Gifts
Miscellaneous (anything that doesn’t fall into the above categories gets it’s own category or goes here)​




Don’t say to yourself, “Well, I usually don’t spend $400 on clothing so that isn’t realistic.” If you spent it, then it’s realistic. You are averaging together two months, which should account for those less common expenses. Brutal honesty isn’t fun, but it’s vital for this exercise.

So….what do you see when you look at your piece of paper with your average monthly expenditures for the past two months? Are there any surprises? Did you actually realize how much you’ve been spending?

It can’t continue like this. The economy will not withstand it. Step one is to see where you can cut things out right now from the above expenditures. Can you reduce your grocery bill? Slash meals out? Budget more carefully for gift-giving and school clothes?



Design Your Own Personal Austerity Plan


Step two – this is where the brutal cuts come in. What can you change about your life? Where can you reduce expenditures by several hundred dollars monthly? This is the point at which most people say, “I can’t.” Most people don’t want to move to a smaller house, get an old car, or go without premium cable. But this is where you can truly dig in and change your life.

As I said before, everyone’s situation is different. You may be locked into a mortgage on a huge house in a market that won’t even cover the balance of what you owe. It could be the same with your vehicle.

Explore all of your options, though, because paying a few thousand dollars to get out from under it could be worthwhile.

Some people could have reached the point where they must begin to default on payments. That too, is a personal choice. I’m not recommending that you blow off your obligations. (However, do consider the fact that large banks get bailed out by the government, and everyday people do not.) Before making decisions like that, be sure to discover all of the potential ramifications, such as repossessions, garnishing of bank accounts, and ruined credit.


Here are some cuts to consider:


Move to a smaller house. Contrary to popular belief, no child ever died because he or she had to share a room with a sibling.

Relocate to a small town. Is it worthwhile to commute to a job in the city from a smaller, less expensive location? This can give you the added opportunity of homesteading and providing for many of your own needs. Click HERE to read about what you need to know before making such a move.

Get rid of your late model year vehicle. Look for a decent used vehicle that you can purchase with cash.

Cut back to one vehicle or even no vehicles. Sometimes public transit and your own two feet can provide all of the transportation you really need at a fraction of the price of owning a vehicle. This varies by location.

Stop using credit cards. This goes for any type of lending system that requires you to pay interest. Stop accumulating debt.

Don’t eat out. Limit meals out to no more than once a month or special occasions. Even better, don’t eat out at all. Dining out, even at a fast food place, is at minimum 4 times more expensive than the same meal prepared from scratch at home. (And far less healthy!)

Look for free or low cost entertainment. Consider a family YMCA or community center membership instead of gymnastics clubs or private tennis lessons if you need to enroll your kids in some activities. Go hiking, have picnics, explore parks, go to the library, and find out what’s offered for free in your home town. Learn to enjoy productive hobbies like canning, carving and needlework. Switch from cable to Netflix.

Use the envelope method to budget for shopping trips. For back-to-school shopping or Christmas shopping, decide how much you want to spend. Put that money in an envelope. As you shop, place each receipt in the envelope. When the money is gone, it’s gone. If there’s something else your child desperately wants, then they need to decide what item they’d like to take back to get it. Be firm and stick to your guns. This has the added benefit of teaching your children to budget.

Reduce your monthly payments by cutting things like cable, cell phones, home phones, and/or gym memberships. Look at every single monthly payment that comes out of your bank account and slash relentlessly.

Shop using the stockpile method. Shop only the sales and simply replenish your stockpile.

Eat leftovers. Have you ever stopped to think about how much food you throw out every month? You can often provide a few “freebies” every month by carefully repurposing your leftovers.

Stay home. By spending more time at home, you will spend less money. You won’t be grabbing a bottle of water, going through drive-thru for lunch or putting fuel in the car. Learn to treasure you time at home with loved ones – it’s worth more than money.

This is not a comprehensive list – when you look at your personal expenditures, other ideas will present themselves.



Why Now?

Why is it so important to make these changes?

Because if you don’t change your way of life, the government will. A job loss will. Inflation will.

When cuts are made, the Powers That Be make sure to devise it so that those cuts affect the average person – the voters.

They can make it hurt, then swoop in and “rescue” us, by further enslaving us.

You want medical care? Get this handy microchip inserted in your arm.

You want food for your kids? Turn in your guns.

You want the electricity turned back on in your home? Sign on this dotted line – it’s only your freedom.


These upcoming cuts won’t hurt the ones who are making the cuts. Congress members will still get large salaries and raises. The First Lady will still spend millions of taxpayer dollars on vacations that would make Marie Antoinette blush. The White House will still serve gourmet meals while Americans are digging through the garbage to stave off hunger. The budgetary decisions are scare tactics, bread and circuses, all designed to distract people from the collusion going on between the UN, the global elite, the bankers, and the governments.

Realistically speaking, the way things are going, none of us is likely to get a hefty raise. We’ll be lucky to keep the incomes we have. But expenses are only going to go up. To keep the true necessities within reach, we need to reduce our expenditures and put away emergency funds and stockpiles.

Personal bank accounts are being plundered across Europe. People are not just living paycheck to paycheck – there ARE no more paychecks. They’re living hand to mouth, hunting and gathering what they can in order to stay fed.

Making some difficult changes now can provide a stable standard of living in a world that is going downhill at breakneck speed. By decreasing your monthly output, you can hang on to necessities. I’d rather choose my own austerity plan than to have it forced upon me.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


About Daisy: Daisy Luther is a freelance writer and editor who lives in a small village in the Pacific Northwestern area of the United States. She is the author of The Pantry Primer: How to Build a One Year Food Supply in Three Months. On her website, The Organic Prepper, Daisy writes about healthy prepping, homesteading adventures, and the pursuit of liberty and food freedom. Daisy is a co-founder of the website Nutritional Anarchy, which focuses on resistance through food self-sufficiency.

Daisy’s articles are widely republished throughout alternative media. You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter, and you can email her at daisy@theorganicprepper.ca.


One Last Piece of Advice

As I was preparing this article, I pinged Daisy and asked if she had one more bit of advice for Backdoor Survival readers. Here is what she said:
When you are trying to crack down on your budget, go on a complete spending freeze. Pause before spending money. Decide if you really need the item or if it can wait.

If you do need it, spend some time learning to make things that you would normally buy. I make things like yogurt, cheese, holiday decorations, cleaning supplies, and lunch box goodies. This has saved me thousands of dollars over the years.

And if you go off the wagon and spend money you feel you shouldn’t, be kind to yourself. Don’t use it as an excuse to go on a crazy spree. Just start right back up again on your frugal route, and you’ll be back on track in no time.


The Final Word

Austerity is not a stranger in my household. I can recall a period about twenty five years ago when there was no money coming in, large medical bills, and a mortgage to pay. Even then, we were fortunate to have stored foods and a substantial emergency fund.

For me, it helped that I have always been a frugal do-it-yourself type. Sure, I like nice made from of leftovers and “garbage” soup are regular gourmet delights in my household. Dining out is for special occasions and gifts to each other are small but meaningful.

As prepper’s we need to set our own barometer of personal austerity. Whereas not everyone can live below their means because they do not have means to begin with, they can examine their spending habits and attempt to make the tiniest of changes to ensure their financial survival down the road.


Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!
Gaye


http://www.backdoorsurvival.com/embrace-personal-austerity/
 

90%RealMoney

Midas Member
Midas Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2011
Messages
4,806
Likes
4,049
Location
Left Flank, Oceana...Locked and Loaded!
Ok that does it!
I'm going to put the last threads by agnut & 90%RealMoney together and head off to thrift shops in search of old helmets.

Question... why did yours hit the jackpot & this one fare so poorly by comparison?:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Used-Bell-M...parel_Merchandise&hash=item2a47f0a383&vxp=mtr

What are some things that make a great selling helmet?
Color? Kid sizes? Open face? How do you know dates?

Is this a winner, or a dog?:
http://harrisburg.craigslist.org/mpo/4781039958.html
Glock, that helmet on Craigslist might be worth a shot if you could get it REAL cheap, like 10 bucks or so. My guess is that since the guy is listing it on Craigslist, he either knows or thinks it is worth something, and probably wants 50.00 or more for it. At that point, it's probably not worth pursuing, especially with the faceshield missing. It's best to go after things you know about. I've learned too many lessons by buying things I thought were worth money on a whim, when I should have either researched it, or just passed it by. It's kind of like the bullion vs. rare coin thing. I've been a motorcycle enthusiast my whole life. I'll say one thing, I've sold every motorcycle part, accessory, or memorabilia I've ever listed on Ebay without any trouble at all.
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Sr Site Supporter
Mother Lode
GIM Hall Of Fame
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
73,083
Likes
34,633
*Some time the best bargains are things you can get for free. Either by doing cleanouts (I used to do lawn care and cleanouts on the side) or by simply driving around and looking for "curbside" bargains. And don't forget the "for free" section on Craigslist.


Prepping While Commuting To Work, by A Minute Man



I live on the megalopolis east coast in an old New England mill city. The large city near me is usually considered to be one of the five most expensive urban areas to live in America. I’m lucky; I have a job. My daily commute is about 15 miles from where I live, and it takes me about 40 minutes each way on a good day. This commute takes me through seven suburban cities, on the back roads as well as the main city streets. The local interstate is too gridlocked to use for the morning commute. Before you feel badly for me for my daily commute, let me tell you about the things that I see, pick up, and put in my pickup truck on my daily ride. As I like to say, every day is trash day somewhere!

These “Found” Items include:

•Glass Wash Board (I hear that the “country” look is going out of style. Well, that may be true for some people. It was worth $35 when I went to the company that made its website. It was marked $10 with a yard sale tag. The glass is unbroken.)

•Water Hoses (There are too many to collect. I see so many of these that I only even look at the rubber ones now. Vinyl isn’t final.)

•Kids Wading Pools (These are around at the end of the summer, and they make good raised garden beds I’m told.

•Flowerpots

•Baseball Bats (One of mine is a Johnny Bench model; it could even be a collectible!)

•Plastic Containers (many types)

•Closet Maid Shelving

•Plastic Picnic Coolers (I see too many to collect them all. A little cleanser and some bleach works wonders. Some people use them as storage or bury items in them.)

•White 5-gallon Buckets (These old buckets are useful, as long as you’re not using them for food.)

•Contractor-grade Wheelbarrow (It was rusty but usable.)

•Stainless Steel Kitchen Sink (There’s nothing wrong with it. Someone was just upgrading.)

•X-Country Skis/ Downhill Skis/ Sleds (no toboggans!)

•Yard Tools (These include shovels, rakes, and handles.)

•PVC Pipe

•Windows

•Gas Cans (with non-EPA approved nozzles that are easy to use and work)

•Scrap Wood and Plywood

•Yellow Mop Buckets with Wringer (These are multipurpose items, which could also could be part of my clothes washing machine someday.)

•Wooden Clothes Hanging Racks

•Popcorn Tins (These are usually seen in January and February, after the holidays. I line them with bubble wrap and use them as Faraday Cages. Some have cute puppies on the outside, too! These tins used to be larger in the past, but these will do.)

•Canning Jars


I never drive out of my way. I’m not cruising around the neighborhoods looking for stuff, like the scrap metal collectors do. I’m just driving to work. I know what I need, and when I see something and it’s safe to stop to get it, I do so. It makes the commute much more enjoyable when you approach the ride each day with a treasure hunting “what–am-I-going–to-find–today” mental outlook. I also look for the yard sales signs and the For Sale/Sold signs on houses as clues to upcoming opportunities. Nothing feels better than to take an item off my list that I paid either nothing or very little for.

Some of you may find what I do to be distasteful. I don’t. I‘m not taking filthy or broken items, and I’m not digging around for anything. Nor am I making any mess. Most people leave the usable stuff off to the side. They know what they are doing, and they are trying to make it easy for people like me. If I see someone on the property, I ask them. I don’t assume. If I don’t see anyone, I always look at the house after loading up and say aloud, “Thank you.” One of the few (and, trust me, there are a lot of) responsible things that I have always done is recycle. This material is heading for a landfill, and there is nothing wrong with anything that I take except that the people who bought it got tired of it or now no longer have a use for it.

Understand too that my means to prepare for what I see coming down the road is limited. Currently, I’m alone on this ride, and there is only one very middle class paycheck coming in. By gathering the things that I may need in this manner, I have the resources that I need to buy other items and still have these preparations that I otherwise could not or would choose not to have. These other items can usually be found in grocery stores.

I’m sharing this with you not to boast on what I have but to perhaps give you some ideas how you too can prepare without taking out a second mortgage. I have read this website for years, and I would like to give back to it and to all of you for the knowledge and ideas that you’ve given to me.


Some of my Recent Yard Sale, Weapon Show, Antique Auction, and Flea Market finds include:

•Brand new condition USGI MS65 Field Jacket in Woodland pattern – $20

•Brand new, never used Coleman lantern with two new Coleman mantles in a Coleman plastic case- $5.00 (The case alone is worth $10, and the two new mantles are probably worth $2.50.)

•Hand tools – Craftsman wrenches and screwdrivers – Nicholson files – $1.00 each

•Scythe – $8 (It’s at least 100 years old. A little mineral oil on the wood and it’s beautiful. I won second place using it as part of my Halloween costume. I got a $30 coffee gift card as the prize. Want to guess what I went the party as? Perhaps it was a case of “art” imitating “life” one future day.)

•Junk silver coins from flea market dealers – (They’re usually a bit over what I can get junk silver for online, but it’s a cash no-paper and I-can-see-the-coins transaction.)

•Kelvar helmet – $30 (USGI issue. Yes, it’s a bit dorky, but it’s better to have and not need than the alternative. Also, next Halloween I could be G.I. Joe, and if I win a costume prize again, it’s free.)

•National Guard digital camo pattern backpack – $5 (USGI and in really nice shape. After I washed it twice, the cigarette smell came out of it. A really great bug-out bag for that money. A similar one was about $25 – $30 in a recent catalog of a company that you might know. See “Lantern” above.)

•Three, used, very good shape USGI Woodland Pattern shirts – $15 total (“These will be great for paintball,” said I when I bought them.)

•Nylon woodland pattern poncho – $2 (There was no label, but the heavy duty grommets and the material it’s made of gives it away. It looks brand new. It sure looks and feels just like my USGI Vietnam era one. I wish the guy had 10 more.)

•Three metal green (period) 50MM ammo cans – $10 each. (There were not a lot of stenciled military codes on the side. They look brand new. I’m not sure if they are USGI or not, but at that price I took them all. The plastic ones cost almost this much.)

•Larger square ammo cans – $15 each. (You see these around from times to time. They are slightly larger than a milk crate with a gasket in the lid and a clamp on all four sides. They‘re usually light grey. I buy every one that I see. Like someone said to me about these cans, “Do you know how much it would cost to make these today?” Exactly. One thing about mil spec is that it’s made to military specifications for use in war and general mayhem.)

•One-quart canteen covers – USGI – like new – $2 each.

•USGI used canteen cup – $2

•USGI Pistol belts – $5

•Ammo holder with the two side pockets – $3. (USGI and in brand new condition. Go ask ALICE! They fit the 30 rounders or so I’m told, as I can’t have these magazines here.)

•Two saws – A one man and a two man – $15 for both (They will look good “on the wall” of “the cabin” someday.)

•Canning Jars – seven cases for $5 total

•Large Ice tongs – $5 (These are about the same size that Curly takes a frozen Larry out of the back of the Hook, Line, and Sinker fish truck with.)

•Dietz Kerosene Lantern – Little Wizard model. $7 (It might have been used once. The Little Wizard is one of the larger capacity models of the Dietz line. It had a red globe, but the Amish took care of that for me. Now I have a spare globe that I can use as a signal lamp if I ever have to climb a nearby steeple’s stairs for Act 2.)

•Two 20” front bike wheels with inflated tires – $10 (They’re all ready for the garden cart I plan to make. The no-flat tire upgrade has some pluses and minuses. I usually find a can of Tire Slime at yard sales for a $1. I stopped collecting Tire Slime at four cans.)

•Three brand new, USGI canteens with the gas mask straw holes in the top cover – $2 each. (The guy at the gun show said he was selling a lot of them. I wonder why?)

•Blood Pressure Cuff – $7 used (I bought it for the medical kit.)

•Alaskan Ulu knife with a wooden cutting board on one side and a chopping bowl on the other side – brand new in the box for $10 (A friend just came back from AK. He told me what this costs up there.)

•Two brand new, black, Schwinn pannier bags that hook on to a rear bike carrier over the back wheel – $10 for the set (I had to cut the plastic and cardboard off the packing material to get them apart. These were on the ground next to the Ulu. I really loved that booth!)

•Three USGI Woolen Blankets – $10 for all three blankets. (These were used but were in amazing shape. They are still inside my truck with the Hudson Bay Point blanket that I purchased for $65 at an antique shop. No fabric item comes inside my house unless it’s going straight to the washing machine and then into the dryer. It’s the dryer heat that will kill any little critters. With wool, this is harder to do, and dry cleaning shops are not very kind to a middle-class budget.)

•Cans of spray paint in earth tones of green, brown, and tan. Also flat black – $1 per can (I buy as many of them as I see.)

•Axes – $3-5 (Old steel is usually high carbon American-made steel.)

•Cast iron 8” frying pan, new in the package -$4 (It was made in China; well, nothing is perfect.)

•USGI Mosquito netting, yards of it – $2



Alas! Some items got away for various reasons.

What Got Away, included:

•Two Peavey hooks (These were sold before I could get to the booth from the parking lot.)

•Plastic wedges for tree cutting (The ones that I saw looked like they had a tree fall on them. What was I thinking?)

•Gas cans (They are usually plastic, but I have seen a few metal ones too. There were no EPA nozzles on these either.)

•Speaking of ALICE, there are too many packs and frames to count. How many can I have?

•The Korean War era USGI packboards (They’re not very comfortable to wear but great to pack things, like chain saws and even small outboard motors. I saw one once for $5, and I passed on it. I still think about it. I need to buy the next one I see, if only so I can forgive myself.)

•A Kelty pack and frame from the 1970’s, with an asking price of $10 (It was fire truck red, and the Kelty’s were never very waterproof, so I passed. In the day, these were $40-60 packs.)

•Blue Enamel Canning Pot (I should have picked this up for the $5 that the auctioneer was asking.)

•Two used, USGI Artic canteens with covers – $10.00 each (That’s half of the cheapest catalog price that I’ve ever seen.)

•An 8 or 10 inch x 4” sharpening stone (I didn’t want to wait around for it to come up at the auction.)

•There is a lot of usable, good, wooden furniture that gets tossed out weekly. The same is true with the resin yard furniture. I‘ve seen resin that looked brand new and was not a stained mess on the side of the road. I don’t touch cribs, mattresses, or upholstered furniture.

•USGI woodland pattern pants– W 31-35 / Short (I see them, but they are either too used or are too expensive for my blood. Got any?)

•Froe – a tool to make wooden shingles with (I’m on the hunt for one. I know what the Amish have and that they’re looking for it. Knowing the catalog prices of items really helps you and also knowing when to make “the buy” with confidence– early in the morning when it’s really cool or too warm, the seller might not have had his coffee yet and might not be sure of his price. This is how I got a drawknife for $10 that three people asked me to sell to them while I walked around the same field later that morning.)

•Side handle police batons (These used to be everywhere in the catalogs; now they have vanished. I’d like to upgrade.)

•Two used Thermo-Rest inflatable mattresses with a repair kit – $20.00 (They were orange; I have a few already.)



Final Thoughts

The people who are tossing or selling this material don’t see or don’t understand the value in what they are getting rid of, like we do. It’s just stuff they can make a buck or two on or get some clear space in the basement or the garage. As far as their prices go, they don’t read the same catalogs that we do. Let them keep their latest model smart phones, electric can openers, $40,000+ pickup trucks, and 55-inch TVs. They can sell me their Grandma’s old junk for pennies on the dollar or just let me take it away for them.

Look around and realize what’s happening. Always remember that even if you are able only to do a very little, what you are doing and understanding is more than 85% of the people among us are doing or care to even try to comprehend. I do not write this with superiority or glee but with concern and sadness.

Get set, get ready, be safe, and keep your top knot. Let us hope never to need many of the items we now gather or ever have to experience the future that appears to be looming. Also, whistle on your way to work.



http://survivalblog.com/prepping-while-commuting-to-work-by-a-minute-man/
 

pitw

Gold Chaser
Midas Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
3,789
Likes
4,831
Location
Eastern Alberta.
Well seeing this is a PM type board I gotta try and explain this one. I had put 4 guns on a site with an asking price of 3 oz's of gold[I really wanted to see if anyone would trade gold for something useful cause I wanna know]. Well I figured no one would really want all four 250-3000's savage bolt rifles but was willing to see where the dust settled. Had a few messages asking if I'd break them up and 1 in particular had me interested as the guy was willing to buy gold if I'd tell him where and how to do it and then send it to me[good sign in my books]. He happens to be from about as far East in Canada as you can get so I phoned him and made a deal that about blew me away. He is going to buy gold to trade me and some for himself as he always wanted to get into PM's but didn't know how to start. He is over paying me because he was thankful for many messages and the phone call where he learned something[I'm not sure if he was buying the gun or knowledge by the time we were done]. Another fellow took the best[in my eyes] gun of the four for one ounce and I think that he was doing the deal just like me to see if it could be done. So now I'm down to two guns that I've been offered cash money for that would buy me ore than what my original asking price was easily but I'm holding out to see if anyone else wants to trade for shiny.
 

glockngold

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
3,589
Likes
4,875
About the helmets:
I wouldn't spend a lot of time searching, just another thing to be on the lookout for, if it comes your way.
Knowledge is power.
In the past, I would have ignored yardsale helmets, because any that I have come up with in the past have been low dollar fleamarket sellers for me.
Now, I'll take a second look & maybe come back after researching. (here is an instance where you smart phone guys have an advantage being able to google stuff on site).
Looking for deals is like modern hunting gathering.
You have to stay alert, & know the signs.

About 2 years ago now, I was getting bids for having an 80 x 40' concrete pad poured in my pole building.
I was talking to the contractor who walked me back through the shop & we sat down in a room that was stacked with a lot of dusty road cases, theater lights, & cables.
I asked him what he was doing with that stuff.
He said that he was the landlord for a dinner theater that had gone bankrupt, & the lighting was left behind when they left.
He said he just wanted it gone.......;)
I paid him $2500.00 for the pile & made 2 trips getting it home.
Over the next 6 months Ebay & I turned that into $6000.
I was able to do that, because I knew what the stuff was & how to piece it out.
Knowledge was power.
 

pitw

Gold Chaser
Midas Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
3,789
Likes
4,831
Location
Eastern Alberta.
Man is that ^^^ fact.
 

90%RealMoney

Midas Member
Midas Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2011
Messages
4,806
Likes
4,049
Location
Left Flank, Oceana...Locked and Loaded!
I see people at Thrift stores all the time, taking pictures of things, or checking the internet for pricing. I guess I need to enter that arena as well. Boy, you can sure tell how bad the economy is, just by how many more people are trying to scratch out a living doing the thrift store, flea market, yard sale routine. Three years ago, I hardly saw people at the local thrift stores, now they're packed all the time!
 

90%RealMoney

Midas Member
Midas Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2011
Messages
4,806
Likes
4,049
Location
Left Flank, Oceana...Locked and Loaded!
@Glockngold, here is a helmet for sale on Ebay, that is similar to the one you posted for sale on Craigslist. This one here is in really bad shape, no face shield, not even any rubber around the opening, interior thrashed, yet is currently bidding at $60.00+. Apparently there is an outfit in Portugal that is restoring these old helmets to near new looking, and charging boo-koo bucks for them ($1000.00+) The auction ends in a couple hours, it'll be interesting to see what it goes for. Shipping would be near 20 bucks stateside too! http://www.ebay.com/itm/11153604889...d=361136849539/?ssPageName=ADME:B:WNA:US:3160


Here's one of the restored ones for sale:http://www.ebay.com/itm/VINTAGE-KEN...rcycles_Parts_Accessories&hash=item3399bce11a
 
Last edited:

agnut

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
122
Likes
403
Hi all. Got a problem that has been haunting me for some time. Two couples who are dear to me are contemplating buying houses. I have spoken to both of them but the subject is fraught with so much emotionalism and uncertainty that to fully broach the subject in all its ramifications is almost too much for them to absorb in a businesslike manner.

Years ago I came up with an “advice matrix”. It goes like this.

1. I give bad advice and they take it. Now they are angry at having taken my bad advice.
2. I give bad advice and they do not take it. Now they think I am a fool whose advice would have hurt them.
3. I give good advice and they do not take it. They are hurt, realizing that they should have listened to me. Resentment and rationalization come to the fore.
4. I give good advice and they take it. They are bettered by having taken my advice. They either appreciate my advice or deny that they had taken my advice. Don’t disbelieve that they can deny my good advice’s helping their situation; it had happened to me in the past more than once.

So in #1 they are angry. In #2 they think me a fool. In #3 they are resentful with rationalizations. In #4 they can either be grateful for my advice or deny that my advice guided them to safety.

As you can see, only #4 has the potential for a win-win outcome. So even good advice taken isn’t a sure thing.

So why advise others in the first place ? The answer is that seeing friends and family facing potential catastrophe would be painful if I were to say nothing. And I would have to carry that knowledge that I didn’t make them aware of the dangers.

Sadly, we are playing on a shifting field these days. We are aware of all the monetary manipulations going on which make the odds of a correct assessment nigh impossible. For instance, what of the looming potential for a massive bail-in occurring ? These recent articles spells it out :

http://ellenbrown.com/2014/12/01/new-rules-cyprus-style-bail-ins-to-hit-deposits-and-pensions/

Big Banks Will Take Depositors Money In Next Crash

http://usawatchdog.com/big-banks-will-take-depositors-money-in-next-crash-ellen-brown/


These two couples have money in the bank which I have already advised to withdraw and hold either cash or physical silver. One couple has a great deal of money in the bank and have told me that it would be difficult to withdraw so much money. I have told them why; it is because of fractional reserve banking wherein their money in the bank is actually not there but in various investments such as stocks, bonds, real estate and possibly derivatives. Probably only 1 or 2 percent of deposits are in the bank for day to day transactions. Telling this fact is always received with shock and confusion. The general populace is oblivious as to the precariousness of their banking security.

Couple one is paying $1,550 per month rent. They estimate that if they buy a house with $20K down, their mortgage payment will be about $800. They would save about $750 per month, $9,000 per year. In two years and two months they would break even if they were unable to continue paying the mortgage and have to walk away for one reason or another. That is their reasoning and I have to admit that it does make some sense. The only fly in the ointment is what the future holds within that 2 years.

Couple #2 is looking at buying acreage and building a house. They have enough money to pay in full and have no mortgage.

The overview here is whether holding cash or spending the cash on a house will be the better option. Time passing with all the potential changes that will take place will be like living on the side of a volcano, never knowing if there will be a catastrophe tomorrow or in a hundred years.

I have advised both of these friends that instead of buying a property right now (which may crash in the near future) to instead buy physical silver. The potential increase might make a world of difference. But nothing is 100% assured; we places our bets and takes our chances.

Best wishes,

Agnut
 

Usury

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Apr 1, 2010
Messages
4,807
Likes
4,384
I would spread it around. Buy/build the house, but get only a small, easily manageable mortgage. Keep some in the bank (preferably at the same bank as the mortgage so you can easily transfer to pay towards or payoff the mortgage in the event of account restrictions in the future). Keep some in physical cash. Keep some in stocks/bonds. And of course keep some in preps and PMs. I would advise diff PMs also...gold AND silver at the very least. Tell them you don't know what's going to happen...no one does, but this strategy seems to spread around the risk such that one area of catastrophe should not come near wiping them out. They are also exposed to different areas for potential gains as well.
 

90%RealMoney

Midas Member
Midas Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2011
Messages
4,806
Likes
4,049
Location
Left Flank, Oceana...Locked and Loaded!
ag, the first part of your story reminds me of a code a Contractor friend of mine had years ago. He always said, "If you do work for friends or family, either do it for free, or charge them double, either way they're going to think you are screwing them"!
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Sr Site Supporter
Mother Lode
GIM Hall Of Fame
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
73,083
Likes
34,633
In Want of A Nail


Dec 2


Posted by sierra2one


By: Tom Chatham

So, you’ve got all of your supplies ready for anything that happens in the future. You have plans and backup plans and you feel ready for anything. You have an ample supply of food and the means to produce more. You have weapons, land, communication systems, backup power systems and alternative energy supplies. You have a good library, precious metals and ample medical resources. So, you think you have everything covered within reason, right?

What will you do when your generator stops? Do you have spare parts to fix it? Do you have plugs and oil and supplies to do routine maintenance on it for years to come to keep it operating?

You have a good rifle and a pile of ammo and you can hit targets out to 500 yards with ease. What will you do if your firing pin or a spring breaks? Do you have critical repair parts to insure that weapon will continue to be useful when you need it most?

Something as simple as wheel bearing grease can cause a catastrophic failure if you don’t have any to keep your equipment lubricated. Sure you have fuel and alternative fuel systems to power your equipment but do you have the repair parts to keep those machines running or rebuild the engine if necessary?

Some years ago you could not drive down the road without getting a windshield full of bugs but because of all of the pesticides in use today the bug population has been almost eliminated. When everything stops and those pesticides are no longer available on large scale those bug populations will suddenly increase to previous levels. Do you have the materials to protect your garden from this threat?

Many people now have the bug guy spray around their home every year to prevent roaches and termites from getting a foothold and causing serious damage. What will you do when you can no longer get those services?

You did a lot of planning and you know your water will still flow no matter what happens in the world but did you stop planning there? What will you do when your faucet or your pipe starts leaking? Do you have washers, extra pipe or connectors to fix that problem?

When a storm blows through in the future and breaks a window or makes a hole in the roof, can you fix that? You have a woodstove and a good supply of wood and everything to cut that wood but what happens when your ax handle breaks? Can you fix that?

In the future, if you are using your woodstove every day, will you be able to keep your chimney clean? A chimney fire is unusual but can be devastating if it happens and you have no fire dept. to call.

It is impossible for the average person to plan for everything but there are certain things that you need to think about in depth and be aware of in the event you cannot get replacement parts or services in the future.

Simply having some woodworking tools and some hardware items can go a long way to maintaining your tools and home. Having a few key repair parts for your machines can be a lifesaver in a drawn out situation where you cannot find the parts you need. The fact that many parts are now made overseas will make any transportation or supply disruptions even worse. A loss of currency reserve status for the U.S. would make any imports much more expensive even if you could still get them.

There are so many weak links in our current supply system that it should make the average American very uneasy. No one knows for sure what the future holds in store for us but the trends are developing and the picture they are forming is not good.

Some economists have predicted a period of deflation prior to a hyperinflation developing in America. The current drop in commodity prices should be taken with a grain of salt and people should use this drop to bulk up their supplies just in case the current “prosperity” does not last.

When disaster strikes, many realize there was something else they should have had to get through it. Even a prepared person never has everything they would like to have during difficult times but that list can be minimized by careful reflection on their future needs in the dysfunctional world they may one day find themselves in.


http://projectchesapeake.wordpress.com/2014/12/02/in-want-of-a-nail/
 

pitw

Gold Chaser
Midas Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
3,789
Likes
4,831
Location
Eastern Alberta.
It lives.
[video=youtube_share;2jqYDIHNuQI]http://youtu.be/2jqYDIHNuQI[/video]
Now I'm kinda/sorta sad to see it go. That was a fun project that taught me a few things I never knew.
Well we loaded this unit up yesterday and the fellow spent the night at my place. Had a lot of fun with it and folks sometimes it takes a few months to realize bigger premiums as I netted about 4 grand by being patient.
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Sr Site Supporter
Mother Lode
GIM Hall Of Fame
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
73,083
Likes
34,633
Storage Unit Auction success!

[video=youtube_share;sar9Fnt580M]http://youtu.be/sar9Fnt580M[/video]

http://youtu.be/sar9Fnt580M

Published on Jan 2, 2015
 

pitw

Gold Chaser
Midas Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
3,789
Likes
4,831
Location
Eastern Alberta.
That type of stuff would be interesting for sure but I ain't got none near me. I can never figure why anyone would leave anything of real value behind.
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Sr Site Supporter
Mother Lode
GIM Hall Of Fame
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
73,083
Likes
34,633
That type of stuff would be interesting for sure but I ain't got none near me. I can never figure why anyone would leave anything of real value behind.
A lot of people have money problems and have to move (in some cases quick) so they put stuff in storage. Around here you can usually open a storage unit pretty cheap. After a while they may fall behind in the rent and just walk away.
 

agnut

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
122
Likes
403
I posted this somewhere else and thought it might be helpful in the B&H thread.

I’m old school so don’t go by me.

A year and a half ago I cut out my Comcast TV cable but kept the phone and high speed internet. I save $120 a month.

So where does that $120 a month go now ? It goes to buy used DVDs from 50 cents to $2. Hmmm… at 50 cents each would be 240 DVDs per month. And at the extreme high of $2 each would only be a dismal 60 used DVDs per month. So at the very worst case scenario I would have 2 movies to watch every night.

I have even picked up several whole season sets and series for $2 each. I just watched the first season of “Fringe”; 7 DVDs in the set. Over 15 hours of commercial free entertainment.

While at an estate sale a few months ago I got 109 DVDs for 50 cents each. Some were multi disc sets too.

At the same time I’ve been accumulating a library of great movies; I have over a thousand now and counting. And after viewing, these DVDs can be sold at a garage sale for as much or more than I paid.

The best part ? NO COMMERCIALS ! My son and I are allergic to commercials; makes my skin crawl.

Where to get ‘em ? Pawn shops, thrift stores, garage sales, estate sales. Even Craigslist and eBay have DVD collections that can be bought in bulk for a good price.

For Christmas I sent 12 DVD duplicates to my ex and daughters along with some designer purses. Only trouble was that the ground shipping was $42. Next year I send money with the additional shipping too. Lesson learned. Successfully bypassing inordinately expensive activities is a passive defense of the pocketbook.

I do have a long range plan which is to continue accumulating more and then someday have a “video store” at home for trading and sharing. Although the Blue Ray picture quality is better, I see no good reason to collect them; they cost more new and also much more used.

If we want to watch Big Bang Theory or Mike And Molly we can get it free off the internet. And the news ? Are you kidding me ? The REAL news is found on the internet, not the MSM.

We might hook up to an outdoor antenna to get some 1080 HD resolution for the flat screens. But no hurry since we are so busy with more pressing matters. Whoops ! Forgot; they have COMMERCIALS ! Never mind….

Best wishes and Happy New Year,

Agnut
 

agnut

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
122
Likes
403
Thanks for the housing advice. I’ve had time to think about it and the thought comes up that with a deflationary scenario, silver and gold may fall in price. Of course, with such a possible bottom to silver at $8.50 and gold at $800 as some financial writers have written, I would look like a fool to have recommended buying precious metals at current prices.

We must always be aware that we look at gold and silver as a long term insurance policy as well as a long term profitable investment. Those who we may advise generally don’t think in these terms and would be very upset to see the prices fall. They are thinking only in the here and now and the immediate future.

There are no guarantees that our best advice will be beneficial to others. In these real estate deals I have shared both positives and negatives of their proposals. As I wrote, we are in extremely uncertain times and black swan events happening can throw all logical advice out the window.

I haven’t written much lately because of being so busy with projects and people. The other morning I drove a distance to pick up some boxes and tools for a friend who is out of town. Otherwise she would lose them. While in the area I dropped by a thrift store that specializes in construction materials and appliances. I wanted to visit a friend in the area but had picked up some frozen salmon and crab and had to get it home asap. Although this trip was to help a friend, I was given a full suspension 18 speed bike from another friend while I was down there. All in all it was a crazy day with my plans being changed continually. I even found myself shopping in a market with this friend because he doesn’t have transportation. Did you ever have a day when you felt as though you were just along for the ride even though you were behind the wheel?

I’m supposed to be retired, doggonit ! Just kidding. Being retired is getting to do what I want to do when I want to do it. I know that. When I had a transmission shop I was there 7-6 Monday to Friday. I was obligated to a big chunk of my waking hours. Now my life changes from hour to hour. I float like a butterfly, sting like a bee.



Best wishes,

Agnut

P.S. Many things are consuming my time and attention. I really appreciate and enjoy your contributions to this thread and hope you will continue to post as you find new adventures in bartering and horse trading. What I’m trying to say is that I will post when I can. In 2 months I will be 68 years old; I’m not the spring chicken I once was and digging trenches, cutting trees for firewood, and moving tons of items has me flopping at day’s end. Not sure if I’m bragging or complaining but it’s all good.
 

glockngold

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
3,589
Likes
4,875
On storage units...
Before the TV show, I bought similar units for 40 bucks as in the video & still felt that it wasn't worth my time.
I guess it depends on how hungry you are.
I can never figure why anyone would leave anything of real value behind.
pitw, the unit renters are different animals than you & I.
Apartment renters that still collect more crap than they can use.
A business closes, & the owner can't stand to leave all those showcases behind. Then a year later, they run out of give-a -damn.
Lots of hard luck stories: divorce, cancer & subsequent bankruptcy, in jail a longer that expected, my girlfriend was supposed to pay the rent while I'm overseas, but she spent the cash on crack etc.
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Sr Site Supporter
Mother Lode
GIM Hall Of Fame
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
73,083
Likes
34,633
My Start to finish eBay listing process in real time

[video=youtube_share;IPodhd2VUnQ]http://youtu.be/IPodhd2VUnQ[/video]

http://youtu.be/IPodhd2VUnQ

Published on Jan 2, 2015
 

agnut

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
122
Likes
403
Hi all. Last Saturday I wasn’t planning on going anywhere. That is, until I saw a moving sale on Craigslist. My younger son went with me. When we arrived at the sale there was no one around. I had to ring the doorbell. He came in and we started to pick out items and ask what he wanted for them. I told him I was making a pile of things I wanted to buy. Instead of adding them all up, he said that $20 was fine. I picked up a couple of bundles of rope and asked him how much. He said a dollar. After we loaded up we returned to thank him and wish him well. As we turned to leave, we saw a couple coming toward the sale. They looked excited; I felt sorry for them since I had cleaned out the place. But ya know, it isn’t for me to judge something I had bought would be wanted by someone else in particular. Maybe this couple are just out on an outing, not looking for anything in particular. The early bird gets the worm but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Anyhoo, here’s a list of the booty :

2 rakes
3 stainless steel mixing bowls
2 5 gallon gas cans
1 garden hose in reel box
2 oil funnels
2 bundles of rope
2 sunshields for windshield
1 two foot level by Mayes USA
1 sun tea jar
1 box Superslides for furniture
1 large MAG light
2 cans bearing grease
1 purple vase
1 Samurai Pro knife sharpener
1 gardening knee pad
2 empty fish lure boxes
2 full fish lure boxes
17 empty honey jars
3 DVDs, one was a lens cleaner

Lotta odds and ends there, huh ? These items will, in time, go out to their new homes. Just the garden hose in reel box would have cost me more new that all of the items I got.

A thought just came to me. What if the crash comes and most everyone is selling their possessions for any cash they can get ? Will you have the money to take advantage of this fire sale ? A once in a lifetime extreme buyers’ market.

I know what you are thinking. What will I do with all of these new items ? It depends upon your skills in determining which items will still be a bargain within and after this crash. Will shoes, pants, coats, shovels, tools, cars, toilet paper, new socks, plywood, nails, tarps and a thousand other items be profitable to stock ?

I personally have about 30 pairs of pants, 15 coats, about 150 shirts, 20 pairs of shoes, all in my size. More than I will need for the next 10 years. This way, I could sell any that I feel I have an excess.

Food will be high on the list but it may be dangerous to be selling in the midst of a collapse scenario. Growing veggies are a wise choice but there probably will not be enough excess to sell anyway. Think renewable resources.

In time, things will settle down and we can go about our business although in a much changed world. Prices for items will be determined by a mutual agreement between buyer and seller. And by prices, I mean that there will be more bartering and horse trading going on. A shirt for 6 eggs. A coat for 4 hours work. You get the idea.

Nobody knows how the future will pan out. We have to take our best guess and go with it while thinking of other possibilities as the situation demands.

Having 3 or even 6 months of money in hand has been recommended all over the internet for many years. But what if the dollars are practically worthless ? Don’t get me wrong; I do believe in having money for emergencies. I am looking at the flip side. What will be in demand if the unbacked fiat currency has lost all confidence ? Items needed. Could be almost anything but we should focus on what we believe will be the most likely. What these are, I don’t know for sure. You rolls the dice and takes your chances. Suggestions welcome.

And don’t forget items that will create goodwill. Clean water, blackberries, etc. Maybe some items from Harbor Freight such as LED flashlights. The Dollar stores have hundreds of items that may provide comfort to others. I bought 31 pairs of Dollar store thermal socks the other day and might buy more. They aren’t very heavy duty but any new socks should be in demand. Think how long a pair of socks last.

And what if we don’t have a collapse ? Yeah, right ! Seventeen trillion in debt (lots more really), high unemployment, high real inflation, racial strife, derivative dangers and many more black swans out there circling like vultures.

But just for grins, lets suppose what if we don’t ? What will be the price of all the items we have accumulated ? Will they be worth less or more ? We have to think in terms of desirability and need, even though a collapse hadn’t occurred.

Inflation alone will continue to raise prices in the stores, so that the items we have will also increase over time. Another thought being bandied around the internet is that we will be marginalized regarding imports. Not only less imports coming in but the prices will increase.

Sometimes when exchanging my paper dollars for good used items, I have to laugh at the ridiculous prices I am paying.

Diversification is recommended. Specialization is for insects, as Heinlein says.

10 Key Events That Preceded The Last Financial Crisis That Are Happening Again RIGHT NOW
By Michael Snyder 1/6/2015


Ahillock posted this and more at :

http://www.goldismoney2.com/showthr...nancial-Crisis-That-Are-Happening-Again-RIGHT

Best wishes,

Agnut


Venezuelans Throng Grocery Stores Under Military Protection


http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2015-...cery-stores-on-military-protection-order.html


Makes ya think !
 

pitw

Gold Chaser
Midas Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
3,789
Likes
4,831
Location
Eastern Alberta.
Farm auctions are what I mostly get to which are basically a clean out of stuff gathered over the length of the life of the farm. I regularly buy the box's of part full cans of brake fluid/oil/penetrating fluid/hand cleaner/paint/kerosene and such. A box of twenty cans may fetch almost as much as one new can would cost. These I use as I do or store for the future. I also buy the new/unused parts for obscure machines for a buck just to list them on forums where people know what they are for[this works well to supplement the stacking account]. Old farmers used old cabinets to store some of their "Junk" and it's amazing how some of these "junk" cabinets go up in value marketed as antiques. You just gotta keep an open mind and a large amount of space to realize the best outcome for a lot of "Junk".