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Bartering And Horse Trading

agnut

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Hi Pitw. Some of my best deals came from farm sales. Like Pavlov’s dog, I salivate upon seeing an ad for a farm sale. I’ll pass by three or four garage sales on the way to a farm sale and double back later. Farm sales are the filet mignon of sales. Fond memories like when I got a Snap-On click type torque wrench for 25 cents ! Am I drooling again ?

There is the anticipation in getting there, the excitement of walking from the truck to be among all the possibilities, finding that the prices are practically giveaway. At this point I calculate where I should be picking up bargains to begin a pile of items I want. I do this without fanfare in order to not awaken the multitude of other buyers to my method. After I have finished I summon the seller and ask if he will give me a price break on all of the items in my pile. I never have been disappointed; strange, but that is the truth. A discount on bargains; what could be better ?

I remember a garage sale a couple of years ago where the seller must have had a couple hundred DVDs on a blanket with the side labels up where I could read them quickly. There was a placard with the $2 price prominently displayed. I took the seller aside and told him that I was interested in many of his DVDs but have been buying them for one dollar each. He said that would be fine. I then proceeded to stack all of the DVDs as I selected them, while at the same time keeping an eye on the many other buyers who began to watch me in dumbfounded fascination. I barely got done before the other buyers figured it out and started to grab the DVDs they wanted. I boxed up everything, paid the seller and got out of there before anyone even had a word to say. The stealth buyer has left the stage. And on to the next show…

You see, I had learned my lesson from an earlier garage sale wherein I had asked the sellers if they had any DVDs. They looked at each other and laughed then said that they were thinking of selling their DVDs before they moved. They said that I could have them for a dollar each. One of them went in their house and began bringing out boxes and boxes of DVDs, some were season sets with as many as 7 DVDs. There must have been over 500 DVDs. The other buyers were beginning to get interested and I knew that I had to do something fast without appearing excited. So I methodically began to go through the boxes, selecting the DVDs I wanted and piling them on a stuffed chair next to me. The other buyers were beginning to find out about the price and began picking up several for themselves. Not dissuaded, I continued piling while making plans to move into the fray where I found stacks of great titles and some of the season sets which turns out that were also a dollar each. I don’t know if you are familiar with what some of these season sets cost new but the used price is usually about $10 to $15. I ended up with over 100 DVDs and several season sets for a dollar each. I would have bought more but the other buyers were in a feeding frenzy like piranha. I waited a few seconds until they provided an opening and things calmed down. Next I went through what they had missed and got several more. In such an instance, there is no quarter given for laggards. This is WAR ! A peaceful war, that is. Oxymoronic or just moronic; you be the judge.

It is important to learn the “tells” of the sale we are attending ; it is like playing poker. What is the property like ? Is the seller moving and has to get rid of most everything ? Is this an estate sale ? How are the prices ?

And ALWAYS ask the seller what else he may have for sale; especially after you have paid for your pile of items. That way, he knows that you are serious and have more cash to spend. Remember, you as the buyer can see all that the seller has while the seller cannot see what is in your wallet or even what is on your mind. A distinct advantage, ‘ay wot ?.

Gotta go.

Best wishes,

Agnut
 

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[h=1]Bartering for a Living, by J.J.[/h] February 3, 2015 - 3:11 am


Just as we will need people with blue-collar skills, like farmers, carpenters, mechanics, welders, and so forth, society will also need entrepreneurs who have the inventory and negotiating skills required to open stores and to restart local economies in the event of an economic collapse. In such times, it will be mutually beneficial for a farmer to let the local trading post sell his produce as a middle man while he is working the farm rather than spending precious hours each day trying to sell that produce himself.

Most preparedness articles talk about the importance of having extra items on hand for bartering when our economy collapses, but have you ever actually done any bartering? Have you ever thought about how you’re going to trade those extra goods you’ve stockpiled? There are some specific strategies you must know in order to make bartering profitable; there are strategies that will enable you to not only make a living to feed your family in a post-SHTF setting but may even set you up with a thriving business that endures long after your community recovers.

I have 20 years of experience running a variety of different businesses– two of which involved constant bartering as their primary profit generator. I’m going to show you some of the specific methods and strategies I used to make these businesses profitable, using examples that would be relevant in the event you found yourself playing the role of local merchant as your community starts to rebuild.

[h=4]Pricing and Negotiation[/h]I think most people reading this agree that silver coins (pre-1965 U.S. dimes, quarters, and half dollars) will be the new currency of choice in most of the United States if the dollar collapses, so I will be using that as the medium for my pricing examples. Every item in your store needs to have a separate sale and buy price. These values stay the same in trade deals too. For instance, you might sell a tool for $2 in silver coins but only pay $1.50 to buy it. So then a trade might look like this: your $2 tool for their $1.50 and .50 items, which you could then sell for $2 and $1 respectively, resulting in a profit of at least $1.00, depending on what you paid for the original item. Trading (as opposed to selling) is your real key to thriving, because every time you do a trade similar to the example above, you are growing the value of your inventory exponentially. So, unless you need the coin for something specific, you should always push trading your goods over selling them.

The law of supply and demand is also a factor. If you happen to have a lot of those $2 tools in stock, but it’s something that is always in demand, then you might still take them in, but only at $1 trade-in value. However, your sale price should still stay the same, unless you foresee demand decreasing for that item in the future and should then lower your price or offer quantity discounts accordingly (i.e. $2 each or 2 for $3). On the other hand, there might be times when a particular item is in very high demand and you are the only one who has any. In this case, you can raise your retail price accordingly. If a single item in your inventory is especially rare, you can also demand a higher trade-profit because you are “trading down” a harder to replace item for things that are more common, even though their added value might be equal. An example of this would be trading your spare horse for a pile of silver, seeds, and food.

Even today, there is no exact science to pricing goods and services to achieve maximum success. Supply, cost to produce/replace, demand, demographic, competition, operational costs, and location are all important factors. However, at the end of the day, an item is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it.

The keys to my success were that I had things people wanted and zero emotional attachment to them. This meant I had walk-away power, which is absolutely essential to making a profit in a barter/trade environment. That being said, you must not be greedy! God gives us multiple warnings against greed in His Word, such as Proverbs 1:19, Proverbs 21:6, and Jeremiah 17:11. Expecting a profit for providing desired goods and services is reasonable, but ripping people off will quickly lose you customers (or get you shot), and your business will not last. Your goal should always be a transaction that is mutually-beneficial, where you make a profit and they get the item(s) they desire. Also, do not underestimate the cumulative effect of making small profits! When my dad trained me in business and sales, he always reminded me of the famous saying, “If you watch your pennies closely, the dollars will count themselves.”

From time to time, you may also find yourself in the opposite position where you don’t have large stockpiles of an item for personal use. In fact, you might be trying to trade for enough food to feed your family that day. In this case, you do not have walk-away power and would need to adjust your strategy. If someone has an item that you need/want for your personal use, be prepared to value that item at your retail price for trade-in rather than expecting to make a profit.

[h=4]Location[/h]An established physical presence is also crucial to having the upper hand during negotiations. The location of your post-collapse trading post will look different depending on your setting. If you live inside a town, you might transform part of your house or garage into a storefront; or maybe you can rent a vacant store nearby. Perhaps your town will host a weekly public market downtown, in which case you will need to be able to transport, set up, and take down your inventory quickly and efficiently. A good location will look completely different in almost every area, depending on regional stability, population density, availability of space, amount of foot/vehicle traffic, and ease of customer access.

With a fixed storefront that is open regular hours, security will be a big concern. There are some great examples in James Wesley Rawles’ book “Survivors” of fixed storefront security, but every unique situation will change the variables and solutions. With a mobile trading post, you will most likely be a one-man show in charge of your own security and will be the most vulnerable traveling to and from the market. In either case, you need to be prepared to protect your life and inventory (since it feeds you and your family), while your business is open and when it is closed.

[h=4]Marketing[/h]Advertising would be a tricky aspect of running a business when society starts to recover. In my years of experience, I’ve found that the best advertising is a combination of word of mouth and having a great location. Most marketing experts say that it costs many times more to attract a new customer than it does to retain and grow an existing one. Plus, there is the concern of attracting unwanted attention if you used interstate billboards or similarly “loud” advertising after TEOTWAWKI. The best way you can attract customers to your trading post is by choosing a great location from the start and having lots of essential items that everyone is looking for. That way, you become the go-to source in the community. Also, don’t forget about planting seeds in the minds of your customers for repeat visits by going above and beyond in your customer service, store environment, and product conversation.

[h=4]Starting Inventory[/h]This is by no means an exhaustive list, but having extra quantities of the following items WTSHTF will most certainly give you a head start in your bartering:




Also, make sure you have a couple of “spare” bigger-sized items in your starting inventory. It’s important to make sure that you always maintain a mix of both smaller and larger items in your inventory to maximize your trading leverage.

[h=4]Add-On Services[/h]Another key to running a successful retail business is having multiple profit centers or services that draw people to your location. I have used this strategy very successfully in my retail businesses. This principle could be applied post-TEOTWAWKI by selling services, such as knife/tool sharpening, water filtering, cigarette rolling, battery charging, and others alongside your goods. People, especially Americans, are by nature impulsive shoppers and often remember they need or want things only after they see them. Diversifying your business also heeds Ecclesiastes 11:2 advice: “Give portions to 7, yes to 8, for you do not know what disaster may come upon the land.” This might necessitate involving the skill sets of family and/or friends in your community. Doing so would accomplish three things:



  1. It would give your business more profit centers and ways to draw customers,
  2. It would lift up others as they share in your success, and
  3. It will provide more security for your (hopefully) thriving business.


If you are reading this article, you have the same advantage I have had in my successful businesses– you know the types of items and services that will be in demand if our economy collapses and you can start stockpiling those items and developing those services right now so that you have a head start to generating an income and feeding your family when it does. As a disclaimer: Make sure you research and follow any and all applicable laws and licensing/permitting/insurance rules in effect before engaging in any business activities, especially in regards to regulated substances, such as alcohol, tobacco, or firearms.


http://survivalblog.com/bartering-for-a-living-by-j-j/
 

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[h=1]Bartering After SHTF[/h]
Tuesday, February 10, 2015 8:48


(Before It's News)







If the world all went to hell in a hand basket today, you would probably be stuck with what you have now in your possession and what you know or the skills you have learned already. Assuming your city or home didn’t get destroyed and along with it all of your prepper supplies, you could either be pretty well off for some time or in a serious world of hurt almost immediately. Most of us reading this have made some attempts at becoming prepared. Even if you are new to prepping, you may have taken steps already to ensure you have stocked up some water and food for an emergency. Others have years’ worth of survival items stored up just in case.

For all of us, whether we have a ton of preps already stored or are just starting out; the concept of Barter eventually enters the conversation. Bartering is what people routinely used to do before there was the nearly universal concept of money that we have now. Bartering was a way of trading something you had for something you wanted and was widely used as the main form of commerce.

If you had been raising livestock, you could trade a chicken or some eggs to your neighbor for helping you put up some fence. If you were traveling through an area, you might trade a day’s work for room and board for the night. The details of the trade was up to you and the person who had the good or service you wanted.

Many prepping blogs offer information about bartering after SHTF as the replacement potential for commerce if we ever find ourselves on the other end of some crisis that destroys the financial system. The concept sounds valid as in a SHTF world, you could expect to not have any money or a job and your entire existence would be simply trying to get by as best you could. To this end, many preppers recommend stocking up on supplies for barter after SHTF so that you would have a built-in supply of items to trade. These stored items would be one form of new currency in a grid-down world.


[h=3]What are bad bartering items?[/h]Like many of you, I read these articles and look at the comments on prepping and survival blogs to learn as much as I can, but in some cases, I think that the people stocking up extras are deluding themselves. It comes down to a couple of things, but you have to look at what you are planning to trade and what value those items are going to have to someone else.

Frequently, I hear people suggesting to stock up on toiletry items, toothbrushes, combs, notebooks, chap stick, scissors, buttons, coloring books and small knick-knacks like that. I don’t believe that too many people would ever trade for anything like that in the type of end of the world I am imagining that would destroy all modern forms of commerce. Could you find a use for them? Of course, but what would their real value be in contrast to the world you are envisioning?

Take this example: the world has turned so bad that you have no money, no home possibly, no food or shoes. Do you really think you would trade anything you had for a toothbrush? If you are so destitute and the world has devolved so completely that no stores are open anymore, do you really think anyone is going to find value with a pair of scissors?

OK, I can make the case that maybe well after the expected die off from this hypothetical disaster has ended – years down the road you might find someone who is willing to trade you a few eggs for those scissors. Maybe they want to start a new career as the town barber? But after the initial disaster, would those really be the most important items you can think of to trade? What would you give if the shoe was on the other foot in trade for those buttons or coloring books? Would you trade eggs that could feed your family? Would you work all day to give your kids a coloring book? Would you give away a clean shirt you have? Maybe, but I think that is a long shot.

I think that relying on anything that can be viewed as a “nice to have” would make a bad bartering item. Buttons would be lying all over the place on the bodies of dead people or in homes that are vacant. Scissors and paper would too for that matter most likely. Your bartering items are not going to replace the dollar store. You have to remember the viewpoint of anyone in a TEOTWAWKI scenario and think of what they are going to be looking for potentially.



[h=3]What are good bartering items?[/h]The flip side of this topic, would be obviously what are some good items for barter? This is easier to answer, but the problem with coming up with lists like this would be one of resources. If you have something that is valuable enough to trade, would you really want to part with it? It would depend on what the trade was in the end. I can see situations in dire cases where some women and possibly men will trade their bodies because they have nothing else of value. Food, ammo, weapons, tools, fuel. All of these make great bartering items, but would you want to part with them? What would be worth more than your food?

Anything you have after the grid goes down that will make survival possible will be a good barter item. If you have canned food, that will be valuable if there are no stores open any longer. If you have a surplus of .22 ammo or several other calibers, that would be valuable. Liquor and cigarettes would find a home I am sure as these are vices, not necessities. I can easily see people wanting to trade you for a small bottle of whiskey either because they simply want a drink or are having a small celebration. How about small bags of rice and beans?

Other bartering items to consider:


Water filtration kits – Can you imagine the value of having clean, disease free water would be in a post-collapse world? Even if you didn’t trade for it, you could give these to family and save a life.

Coffee and Tea – This is from the same type of list as whiskey. It isn’t necessary, but it sure makes life better for someone coming out of caffeine withdrawals. I can’t see someone trading food for coffee, but you never know. Maybe they have a year worth of freeze dried foods stocked up but neglected to remember the coffee or their favorite camomile tea.

Spare batteries – We have moved to rechargeable eneloop batteries now, with a backup solar charger, but for people who didn’t have anything, small 4-packs of batteries would be very valuable.

Reading glasses – You have to be able to see and if the local optometrist is out of commission, just having a few pairs of cheap reading glasses could come in handy. Replacing broken glasses could be very important to some people. You can buy 6 packs of regular reading glasses for less than $20. It might not be the perfect prescription, but I could see value in these.

Condoms – Need I say anything more?

Seeds – Stocking up on seeds now is a smart plan for the future. I think you should already have a working garden, but having extra heirloom seeds for the people who haven’t thought as far ahead of you could be a relatively cheap barter item that would be very valuable in a post-collapse scenario.


[h=3]What are risks of bartering?[/h]I wrote about some of the risks of bartering in another post entitled the Pros and Cons of Bartering, but I think they primarily come down to getting ripped off or injured in the process of conducting the transaction. Bartering in my mind will be first done among your neighbors unlike some who envision a town market where people show up with everything they want to trade. I just can’t see that happening for a very long time and I can’t envision something like Bartertown out of the Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome movie happening for a very long time. Maybe the bartering expo is a local event and you just have to walk one street over and set up a table or blanket in Mary’s front yard. That I can see, but you would be trading with people you knew or who lived very near you.






After SHTF, you may have to be more careful when you are conducting business.


Trading with people you don’t know is where the danger comes in and this is even truer in a post disaster world. If we are looking at a world without rule of law (WROL), I can see double-cross being used by many unscrupulous people who care nothing for right and wrong, only what they can get. You wouldn’t want to be conducting a transaction with a stranger without taking a few precautions. First, I would never trade unless I had someone watching my back. I think this will hold true for almost any situation where you are out in the open. Second I wouldn’t trade for anything sight unseen. The old excuse, “It’s just around this corner over here” would be a huge red flag. Do not go around that corner!!! I would be yelling at the TV right now.

The risks are that you could have what you are trading for stolen right from you or that, knowing you have items of value, the strangers – maybe even your neighbors would follow you back home in search of other items. All of these possible scenarios make me think that bartering would not see the light of day in an organized fashion without many hard lessons being learned first.


[h=3]How to negotiate a trade[/h]OK, assuming everything else is alright. You are in a safe situation and you are sure you won’t be taken advantage of criminally at least you next have to negotiate the deal in a way that doesn’t leave you on the short end of the stick.

1 – Figure out what you want and what you are willing to trade – Have this firmly in your mind before you ever speak to the person. Knowing an amount you would be willing to part with will help you know how much to initially offer and more importantly, what to walk away from. Don’t offer something you aren’t willing to give.

2- Remember, you do not have to agree to the trade if you don’t like it – Thinking back to point number one. If you don’t think the trade is worth it, walk away. This may actually work to your favor if the person trading really wants to deal. Being able to walk away puts you in control of the trade.

3- Spell out the details – If you have ever read any children’s stories, they are full of situations where the young hero agrees to something without getting all the facts. Yes, I will let you marry my daughter, but I didn’t say which one. And poof you are stuck with the ugly step daughter for a wife… If you are trading one good for another, be specific. If it is a good or service write down the details and have both parties sign. Of course this is only as good as the person’s word you are agreeing with, but it could clarify the deal in a way that saves your bacon. Oh, and it assumes you have paper, which I said was basically worthless as barter….

4-Trust your gut - If something doesn’t seem right, walk away. Trust your intuition and if the person or the details of the trade make your spidey senses start tingling, it is better to hold off.

Barter can be done right now without having any devastation. If you believe that bartering is in our future, you can go practice right now while there is so much less risk. Go out to flea markets or try yard sales. You won’t necessarily be bartering for goods you have, but practice negotiating. Find something you want and go through the process of the transaction to see how it feels. It may help you learn some things about yourself that could help you down the road.

So, now it’s your turn. Are you stocking supplies to barter? What do you have to trade?


http://beforeitsnews.com/self-suffi...after-shtf-2486790.html?currentSplittedPage=0
 

pitw

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Another part of bartering/selling is to always try and make the buyer feel he is in charge. This includes keeping a great buyer very happy as they will return for more goodies. I recently sold a fellow a large denomination note for a fair price cause he had disclosed that he had recently sold his business[lot's of disposable dollars] so I wanted him willing to look at other things I have. Today he sent an email saying how he received the goods in great shape and better than I described. I immediately answered him with a thank you and a note about how I wanted to send him a counterfeit first but was afraid of dieing.LOL He answered so quick it scared me wanting to know about counterfeits so I sent him a pic of 6. That led to him purchasing the 6 for 8.5 times my initial purchase price.[Nice]. He also asked if I had any old guns which may be the end of his disposable money.
 

pitw

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Used my bartering and horse trading skills in my business as well. Last summer I had a group contact me about a job I figured was risky at best. So I doubled my price on risk for the job and then doubled that just to see if they were crazy. They were and I did the job. That led to them not paying for a multitude of reasons. I then sent them a last bill one month ago stating they would be in court in one month if it weren't paid. Head of the group contacted me yesterday saying they wouldn't pay the full price and I said fine we will talk in court as I got all my i's dotted. He showed up this morning and finally agreed to 75% of the original total and I get 3 times my usual charge for a job in the end. Gonna take the profits and go with the boys for another skiing trip to celebrate.
Yesterday I went to purchase a used gun from a contact for another fellow. I had taken an old gun I got for $60 years back as a guy needed gas money. I ended up trading my old gun for this guys new 10-22 and he had to throw in a $100 bill to get it. I then took the new gun to the fellow who wanted it and got $350 for it. Made my original $60 turn into $450 which I will turn into a 1/4oz of gold and wait for the next guy to be outta gas money.
I also dropped off a dozen chicken eggs for a lady 3 hours away who wanted some to teach her child about hatching. She was so tickled that I wouldn't take money that she offered to pick stuff up for me around there that I find online. Money ain't everything.
 

pitw

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Had to take my lad to town for band practice at 11am today so as I had an hour or so to kill, I went down to the funniest hardware in our country. This guy has more junk than you'd think possible to have in one store and he actually has a few. I got to looking in the ammo section when I came across these old Dominion shells.


It's easy to tell they aren't new so the haggle mode hit me like a brick. He wanted $25 a box and I didn't want to pay that. I got him down to $12,50 each which I figured was good enough as he also has a new shipment of 50 cases of .22 ammo coming in next week and I didn't want to piss him off to bad. I brought them home and put these up for sale on a gun forum up here at $50 per and within 20 minutes had sold all five box's to the same fellow for $40 per plus shipping. Sammy[guy who owns the hardware] said if I made double my money to come see him and he'd see what else I can make money on as he doesn't want to waste time looking for the right buyer for all items.
I also got this box.


for the same $12.50 and got my $50 outta them before I left town.LOL
Funny how finding the right buyer pays dividends.
 

pitw

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Couldn't think of a better place to put this. I know nothing about quads but a fellow wants to trade me one[I think it could be this one I found in another of his ads trying to sell a car] and some cash for a truck I no longer want as it is gonna cost me more than I want to put in it down the road. Anyone able to identify this quad for me.
 

pitw

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Seems this stuff rubs off on our young folk if they are exposed to it. Last week a feedlot owner called me with the news that he had a calf in the horse barn for me. These little buggers are selling for $500 to $750 each right now just out of the cow. I picked it up and being a bull calf my lad Donny claimed it for his 4H project. Last evening I had to go over by the feedlot so I took Donny with $700 to go pay for his calf. I dropped him off and continued on to another place to pick up some parts for a KW from another fellow. I traded hubs from an old axle I can't use due to new regulations for 8 air bags from an old KW that just happen to fit on my sprayers but are not available here anymore. I got back to pick up Donny and asked how much he got soaked for the calf? I felt a twinge of pride as he explained the details of his transaction to me. Seems Sam had asked him how much he wanted to pay to which my young smart pants had said, "Nothing would be nice but I hope we can make a decent deal". Seems Sam has 2 grand kids who joined 4H this year who know nothing about halter breaking or leading/showing calves, so he asked Don if he would work with them for a couple week nights to show them the ropes[so to speak]. You see when Donny shows his calves on achievement day they are always the tamest and well behaved in the group[He has rode them all for the crowd as they expect that now]. So Donny now has a calf for few hours of teaching instead of investing money in it. The part that really made me happy was Donny not only got this but he also talked Sam into trading him rolled barley next winter in exchange for labor this summer. When a 14 year old can do this on his own hook it bodes well for his future abilities to survive cashless.
 

pitw

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A couple pics of the calf today, first a run before feeding.


Then feeding time.


This would be the secret to the lad having the quietest calves come achievement day as they are his buddies and he always gets top dollar for having well mannered animals.
 

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Have others had good luck trading gold and silver for other things at good exchange rates? Or do you first have to get cash to do the trade? I have never had any luck with a gold for stuff trade and the times I have inquired people want to do the deal at below value of what I have to offer.
 

pitw

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Have others had good luck trading gold and silver for other things at good exchange rates? Or do you first have to get cash to do the trade? I have never had any luck with a gold for stuff trade and the times I have inquired people want to do the deal at below value of what I have to offer.
I've tried trading PM's for goods with zero success.
 

agnut

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Hi all, my computer is still messed up but I’m sending this post and then getting off quickly in order to save all the info I have to be transferred to the HP laptop. Interesting that when I bought the laptop there was no mention that there was no works program installed and I would have to buy one from Microsoft. Cute.

Anyhoo, here is some recent activity what with winter receding into a very early spring. Everything has been blooming like crazy around here.

Saturday began with an early rise anticipating a few good garage, estate, moving sales (GEM sales). I wasn’t very anxious to shoot out the door as in the past. Probably because I hadn’t been to a GEM sale since January 10. Maybe I was coming out of hibernation like an old bear.

There were several local sales that morning. I mapped them out and the order in which I would show up. So far so good. But ya never know for sure; might be a roadside poster for a sale on the way that diverts ones focus.

The first sale was just a couple of miles down the road. The lady and her family were moving to North Carolina and didn’t want to haul too much stuff that far. Not a big haul but well worth the effort.

Step ladder $2
50’ dog cable with screw in the ground stake $2
8 shovels, rakes, other garden tools $8 total
Coach designer purse $5
Nice leather purse $1
6 insulating tubes for water pipes $1 total

I told her that some of my ancestors had lived in North Carolina since 1700; farmers and ranchers. I wish I could see it before I pass on. After I had wished her well on her new adventure I got in the old Dodge and headed for the next sale. The ad only said that there was some cds, movies, tools and a few other items. You can see why I wasn’t too excited at the possibilities. Boy, was I in for a shock !

When I turned onto the street there was a traffic jam ahead with cars jockeying for a parking space. I pulled over as soon as I could, knowing from experience that this type of mob would only tie me up if I were to compete for a parking space among all the confusion. Better to walk a block that sit in the car for a half an hour waiting for someone to get in their car and leave.

I got out of the truck and the closer I got the more excited I got. For you see, this was about the biggest garage sale that I had ever seen. Near the sidewalk there was a long table covered with tall stacks of DVDs. And on the ground all around the table were boxes full of more DVDs. I estimated that there were between 1,500 and 2,000 to be gone through. I quickly found a corner and began stacking as fast as I could without knocking anyone over. They were for sale at $1 each but the icing on the cake was that there were many season sets and movie multi disc sets for the same price. Some of these sets had as many as 50 movies. I found the seller and asked him if he would give me a price for a large quantity, say more than a hundred. He said that they were a dollar each but would give me a package price when I finished. One of his daughters got a box for me and I quickly filled and received another box, all the while there were about 10 other people picking through the DVDs. Funny but most of them were only picking up one or two movies. The father even had his daughters bring out even more boxes of DVDs for me to look through. It took most of an hour until I was finished. I thought that my putting the DVDs in boxes would dissuade others from picking through my stuff but I still had to keep a watchful eye as a few had to be shooed away.

After I was done there I began looking around. The following is a list of the items I got and their prices :

Oval crock pot new $2
Ozark 6 man tent $5
5X8 area rug free
15 hardback books 20 cents each
Accutron watch $1
3 leather jackets $1 each
Laptop power converter with cord 25 cents
40 channel CB radio new in the box $1
80 gph sump pump free
25 sheet music, old stuff free
35 misc spices $2-
Key Largo placard $2
3 large photo posters of Tahiti islands from the air free
3 really cool hats free
Humidifier new in box $2
3 clamping cake/quiche pans $1 total
Large leather briefcase, the nicest I’ve ever seen. Looked new $1
Umbrella free
2 pairs coveralls new $2 each
2 jackets $1 total
Motorcycle riding leathers $2
Cowboy boots $1
Motorcycle boots $1
High top boots $1
Work shoes $1
Car cover in box $2
More little stuff too…

When totaling up everything the seller asked if I had picked out over 100 DVDs and I said that I was sure that I did. I was only guessing and after I got home I discovered that I had 155 separate pieces. As I wrote earlier, there were many movie multi disc sets and TV season sets. He asked if $100 would be okay. Abysmally stupid to haggle here, huh ?

As you know by now I’m a DVD junkie. Big time. And I just overdosed !

The seller then took me over to a 1991 Olds 98 Elite with only 69K miles on it. It had a badly dented door but the rest was immaculate. He wanted $800 for it. I considered it for a while but decided to pass on it since I already have too many car projects. Besides, GEM season is just beginning here and I’ll need the cash. Sometimes it is more profitable to not buy a good deal.

Now if what you have read so far sounds too good to be true, you are right but not in the way you are probably thinking. After talking with the seller I found out that he is in the business of trash outs and house cleaning. All of the items he was selling came from an estate in which he was actually paid to haul away all of contents. Funny that I had written about estate sales years ago and until now had never connected that sometimes there is a professional cleanup business that disposes of some deceased person’s lifetime accumulation. See ? The learning never ends (or I am such a dim bulb that I pick up new epiphanies on a glacial scale).

In B and H we are flying by the seat of our pants. That is a lot of the thrill of the hunt; you never know what you will find.

Best wishes,

agnut

P.S. Thanks for posting your own experiences; it does my heart good to see others kickin’ ass and takin’ names.
 

Merkin

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I have a pair of doors that look very much like the one on the right, supposedly Cuban Mahogany, about three inches thick. Also supposedly from the first territorial governor of Louisiana mansion. I bought them from a contractor who had worked on the tear down and had them stripped. Would love to sell them. Very heavy. Anyone have an idea of value?
 

pitw

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The calf has a new mom. He's the one having breakfast. The cow is from the old holstein milk cow and this is her second calf. Her bull calf will be fed out for meat next year. If that ain't prepping I ain't sure what is.
 

pitw

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Went to an auction yesterday and bought a large shippers box of junk for $25. Sold old Xmas ornaments, buttons, plastic containers, a silver chest[knives and forks absent] and a John Deere snowmobile owners manual for 4x my initial investment. Sure is comical how folks won't buy the whole mess cause they don't want to deal with it, but will pay more than the original selling point for an item from it. I only wanted 20 owners manuals for old tractors/implements and I got all them now but the JD snowmobile one that I sold for $30 to a guy who just had to have it. In a box at the bottom I found this Avery scale. One original brass cup is was missing but I jury rigged a piece to make it work.

 

agnut

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Sorry to not have written lately, got behind what with all the deals and, oh what the hell, I’ve been busy doing a lot of nothin’ relaxing under the old oak tree sippin’ my coffee with honey and walnut ice cream and munchin’ on homemade oatmeal cookies while reminiscin’ about what my life could have been.

I could have been out there slavin’ for some half brain dead boss who didn’t get any action from his old lady last night (and every other night) and takin’ it out on me. Besides, bein’ on commission is a great way to get around the ‘ol minimum wage laws.

You see, I’m retired and on social insecurity. But my planning for the twilight of my years (or months, who really knows ?) has saved my cookies (see oatmeal above) which has been that I am living within my means. I must admit that luck played a part in my situation; a big part. Often luck is taking advantage of possibilities we are exposed to.

I was fortunate many years ago to have stepped back and taken a good look at the merry go round we are on and realized that the operator of this machine was actually a maniacal, sadistic bastard who took delight in seeing everyone spinning in circles while he increased the speed. Many were thrown off into the dirt while those who managed to hang on ended up with all kinds of head trauma from the ever increasing spinning, a form of PTSD not widely diagnosed except recognized as work stress. These folks who hang on for dear life we call successes; what a sick joke.

Bear with me; I do have a point to make (somewhere, I think). We spend out lives in pursuit of the brass ring, that elusive prize that we have been programmed to seek. Ever reaching out as we spin through our lives, reaching out, risking what is really important. And what is really important, you ask ? Well, in my feelings it is time. Time to sit back and do nothing if I so choose. Perhaps think of some things I may want to do or change. I can go to the beach to pick up interesting rocks or visit an old friend living far away. Freedom to have choices looms large on my mind. We are mortal and that makes each day immeasurably important. Are we happy or miserable ?

I don’t “live large” but I do live broad. I know, funny way to put it but that’s the pathways I’ve been on for decades. To be the captain of our ship (or one man dinghy) rather than to be rowing in the slave galley below to the drum beat cadence of another is a choice, not a destiny.

Bartering and horse trading is a most valuable tool, especially for the future we face. Because of our macro economic trends we are in for a world of hurt; I don’t intend to be any part of it. Through time I realized that money itself was the problem all along. The debauchment of real intrinsic money into fiat currency multiplied exponentially by the profligate sin of credit and debt has pushed the world to the precipice upon which we now find ourselves.

The seven deadly sins. Wrath, greed, sloth, pride, lust, envy and gluttony. Look it up on wikipedia; lots of food for thought there.

Also listed are the seven virtues which are chastity. Temperance, charity (or, sometimes, generosity), diligence, patience, kindness and humility.

The charity or generosity virtue interests me greatly. How to be generous among so much abundance and need at the same time. The movie “Pay It Forward” affected me more than words can express; probably because it comes from the heart and expects nothing in return. I feel that now is the time for us all to pay it forward. An example was a while back when there was an old overloaded truck blocking an intersection. No one would stop and help. The owner was desperately begging anyone to give him a tow. Fortunately I was in my old 1990 Dodge truck. We hooked up and I pulled him up the road to a safe spot. A policeman drove by and asked if everything was alright. The man offered to bring over some homemade muffins. I had some fruit and veggies in the back of my truck and we sat there eating some oranges and conversing. I told him that instead of the muffins that he help another when the opportunity presented itself and to tell the person he helped to also pay it forward. This was a kindness that will be passed through from one to another in an endless chain of charity. After having shared with this man I could see that he was uplifted; his whole demeanor changed for the better. I can only believe that he remembered and helped the next person in need. Maybe I gave him hope that the world wasn’t such a bad place after all IF we helped one another.

I learned that all we have to do is open our hearts and let the love flow both in and out. I see random acts of kindness from time to time and imagine what the world would be like if we were to exercise these seven virtues on a daily basis rather than the seven deadly sins.

We don’t really need money like we think we do; we really primarily need each other in a spirit of sharing and caring. Money is only needed when there is no alternative. Work can be traded. Food can be traded. Rent can be traded. Transportation can be traded. We used to do this before there was money. And now civilization isn’t civil, humanity isn’t humane. Is this progress ? The quality of life has been eclipsed by the quantity of life.

I have been writing this bartering and horse trading thread for several years and through that time I have traded many things. They are all personal and therefore have brought me closer to others. My old boss in the early 70s was a psychologist and told me something I never forgot; listen to the feelings behind what someone says and you will get to the heart of that person.

I’ll tell you a little secret. All of the thousands of items I have collected through the years are here for trading and helping others in the spirit of Pay It Forward. It has been said that generosity is its own reward. That is so true but in addition I have seen it change a heart for the better. Priceless. And the benefits to me come in many unexpected ways.

Well, enough for now. I have a couple of weeks of buying items that I haven’t posted and hope to do that when I get back from my trip; I’m leaving tomorrow at 3:00 AM. I’m visiting an old friend I haven’t seen for years. I don’t know when I will return; maybe that’s the beauty of it.

Best wishes,

Agnut

"To laugh often and much; to win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children; to earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends; to appreciate beauty, to find the best in others; to leave the world a little better; whether by a healthy child, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is the meaning of success. "
Ralph Waldo Emerson
 

pitw

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Had a Saturday off in the spring which is rarer to me than sex. Took my 14 year old boy and went to an auction sale to see what they had and was not impressed so we went garage saling in 5 villages. I believe we hit some 47 sales. Filled the van and even sold some wares before we got home with this lot.

In there are 580 golf balls for $20, 300+ greeting cards at $1, 82 comics for $5, 1 new camera $3, Telescope $5, Electrical panel with breakers[I actually needed this] at $10, 38 plastic tobacco cans with lids $1, 4 man tent [new] $3, camera tripod $5, 2 long sets booster cables with good ends $3, hammer $1, Large plastic pet carrier $5, Kitchen utensils $1, tackle box with 5 new hooks I use for $2, history book of Chauvin $10, large glass jar $2 for the lad to try and fill with loonies and toonies and a unit for holding rubber stamps I needed for my post office display for a buck.
We also got a beaver for $.25.

Three pet cages for $20 and I've already sold the smaller two for $50.

This cage was the one I bought them all for in case we wanted to use it to transport or put a hen setting in it.



All in all it was a great day as we got lemonade from a sweet little girl for 25 cents a glass, breakfast at a seniors center which was fresh cooked egg, ham, cheese on a bun with a large glass of lemonade for $2 and the boy had 3 of them. I met people I ain's known before including one goof who looks like me and does dumb stuff with old shit just like me who showed us his stuff and he wasn't even having a sale[I think I'll go back to his place and buy a wood stove he offered me]. Picked up $5,000 in spraying work for July and the wife wasn't even mad when we got home.
 

agnut

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Hi all; back from the trip. Eleven days and 550 miles each way. I drove nonstop except for fuel and one rest stop. I now realize that I’m getting too old to test the limits of what endurance I still have. However, I had a great time with an old friend and learned a lot.

As promised, I will now list the last two sales I attended for price references.

24 DVDs $24
50 light bulbs new, Mercury, LED flood, other types $5
5 hats $2
Vise grips, needle nose, 2 pair Fiskars garden shears, 50 cents each
18 scissors European, 5 nail polish sets $5
4 umbrellas, 2 were new, one had $20 price tag. 50 cents each
4 tape measures $1 total
10 9 volt, 22 D cell new Duracell batteries $2 total
2 rolls plastic sheeting 4 mil. 10x25 for $1 each
10 pounds wild bird seed free
Framed print $2
2 cookbooks 25 cents each
10 crystal salt and pepper shakers $1 total
Digital timer, oven thermometer 50 cents each
Laptop power cord, inverter 25 cents
2 strainers 25 cents each
Wagner cast iron 2 quart bean pot, like new $2

I got there late and still made out like a bandit. If we hyperinflate like 1922-3 Germany, these items will be valuable trading material. I once read that they were trading brass doorknobs for goods. Lots of good old American and other high quality items still around but I think that they will diminish in the future and be replaced with used Chinese quality items. In fact, in the last few years, I’ve been seeing more and more used poor quality items being offered for sale. So get while the getting’ is good.

The next sale :

25’ tape measure $1
Hammer fiberglass handle $1
2 Orgreenic fry pans 50 cents each
50’ garden hose $1
Weber charcoal briquette preheater $1
Miter saw $1
12 T posts $10 total
2 huge tarps $5 total
30 large candles, most new (about 25 pounds) $5 total
Jacuzzi foam for cover. free
10 U.S. made hose clamps, electrical fittings, etc. for $2 total
BBQ cover $2
Kabela Hamburger press new $1 ($25 plus tax in the store)

I had been looking for a hamburger press for months and happened to ask a seller lady if she had one for sale. She said no and thought about it for a minute. I could see a light go off and she also brightened up and said that she had a new one that she had never used; it was in the house. She went in and got it and the rest is history; now part of my history !

Gotta go; tractors, mowers, weed whacker all need work before I can put them to work.

Best wishes,

Agnut
 

glockngold

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I almost didn't go out to any yard sales today.
Most of the craigslist advertized sales were a good distance away, so I blew those off.
I did have to make a trip to the post office to mail an ebay sale, so I did drive an extra mile to a "mostly baby clothes" sale.
I bought 5 pair of levis my size for 6 bucks.
Then on the way home there was a poorly made sign with an arrow & no address.
I hated to drive without knowing where I was headed, but they put a new bridge down that road, so I was curious to look at that.
I eventually got to the yard sale & am glad I did.
For $30.00 I bought:
An old Snap-On 3/4" ratchet head w/short bar
A rusty Snap-On 3/4" extension
A Ridgid strap wrench (to replace the one the mice chewed off the strap)
A can of Brake spray
A set of drill bits
An incomplete GreenLee punch set. (that one had a price tag for $2.!)
And the kicker............
A Starrett pin vise set.
had no idea what it is used for, but I knew Starrett is a pro machinist name brand.
I just checked on ebay, & similar sets are selling for $40.00
I'll sell those & the rest of the stuff is Free. :9536:

Snap-On Greenlee Starrett 003.jpg
 

pitw

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Today I traded the comics from above for a hundred dollar bill and traded the hundred for a lincoln welder for the shop. Found a place to sell a bunch of stuff at too.
 

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glockngold

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NORTHWEST NW GARAGE MOD PUNK PSYCH PROG SUNSHINE PSYCHEDELIC SOFT POP LP'S
Nice score, but... It's only money. Maybe it'd be best to shoot them before they breed.:rock:
 

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*Nothing special...........just a little bump to the thread

June 3, 2015

[h=2]Have a Garage Sale Without the Garage: Tips For Selling Your Stuff Online[/h]
Brett and Kate McKay








There’s nothing better than a garage sale to make some extra money and declutter your place. But what if you live in an apartment or condo and don’t have a garage?

Not a problem.

Thanks to the internet, you can have a garage sale without a garage by selling your stuff on Amazon, eBay, or Craigslist.

Kate and I did this on a regular basis when we lived in an apartment and were in serious debt pay-down mode. Every 6 months or so, we’d take a day to purge ourselves of stuff we no longer used. While most of it was crap and ended up in the garbage, every once in a while we’d find some great items (often well-meaning gifts we weren’t going to use) that could fetch a pretty penny on an online marketplace.

The money we made from our sale went right to paying down our debt. In some instances, were able to make an extra $500 in a month, which is a nice chunk of change when you’re making minimum wage at Jamba Juice (like we were).

Below is the general method for how we conducted what we called our “purge and profit.”

[h=3]The Purge[/h]Set aside a day for the purge. A thorough purging will take a good part of the day. Set aside a weekend where you can devote yourself completely to decluttering your house.

Create your declutter attack plan. Plan the order of the rooms you want to go through. Start off with some easy rooms to get you in the “declutter zone.” If the room has closets, start off with those before you move to the rest of the room. The same goes for cabinets and drawers — purge those first.

Create a “trash” bag, “sell” bag, and “donate” bag. Have separate bags or boxes for these three categories and sort as you go. Some items, like run-of-the-mill clothing, are better to donate than auction off online simply because they don’t sell that well. If it’s a piece of electronics or furniture that’s in pretty bad shape, don’t discard it just yet. Hobbyists are always looking for items like that to restore and repair. If you’re unsure, you can try selling first, and always get rid of it later.

Ask the “one year question.” If you’re not sure whether you should get rid of something, ask yourself, “Have I used this item in the last year?” If you haven’t, in the trash or donate bag it goes.

Finish a room before going on to the next one. Stay focused on one room at a time. If you try to purge more than one room at a time, you’ll overwhelm yourself and end up quitting before the job is done.

Chuck it or donate it. Take the trash bag and put it out with the garbage. Drop the donate bags to Goodwill. Ahhh…doesn’t that feel good?

Sort your sell collection. Certain items do better on certain platforms. Books, DVDs, and video games are best sold on Amazon; high-end clothing, collectibles, and smaller electronics do better on eBay; items that are too big to ship (like a weight set or a car) or generic items (like baby clothes or tools) are best for Craigslist. Sort your “sell” collection into groups based on where you’ll sell them: Amazon, eBay, or Craigslist.

[h=3]The Profit[/h]Now it’s time to sell your stuff. Here’s what has helped Kate and I get maximum profits from our online sales.
Open sellers accounts on Amazon, eBay, and Craigslist. Opening an account to sell on these platforms is easy. Just click the links below and follow the instructions.



  • Amazon Sellers. You can connect your checking account to Amazon and when you make the sale, the money is deposited into your account. Amazon charges you a fee if your item actually sells. Different items have different percentages. For a complete schedule of their fees see here. Understand that with Amazon, it could take weeks or months before your item sells. You’re competing against a bunch of other people likely selling the same book.



  • eBay. You can have your payment sent directly to your checking account or through your PayPal account. Because eBay owns PayPal they prefer that people use PayPal. eBay does charge you a small fee to list your item on the site and a fee based on the final value that your item sold for. For more information about eBay’s selling fees see here.



  • Craigslist. They don’t charge you anything to list most items, and there are no transaction fees. For exceptions see here.



Know what you aren’t allowed to sell.
The different online marketplaces have different guidelines for what you aren’t legally allowed to sell. It varies by state (and country), but you generally can’t sell alcohol, certain electronics (like radar jammers), any kind of service contract, certain weapons, animals, event tickets, and more. Click here to see eBay restrictions, here for Craigslist restrictions, and here for Amazon restrictions.

Research what similar items have sold for. For books or other media items that you’re selling on Amazon, look at what other products in similar condition are selling for. I’ve always had success pricing mine around the median — right between the highest and lowest. If you really want to move the product, err on pricing towards the low end.

For eBay, they have software that will actually find comparable items and give you ideas for pricing. In my experience, that number is usually a hair low. If you set too high a price, you obviously won’t get any bids. You can use eBay’s advanced search to see how items similar to yours have sold and the price they are auctioning for now.

Take into account the item’s condition when researching as well. If it has some dings and flaws, you should look to start the bid lower than other items.

One final factor is inventory — i.e., supply and demand. I was once able to sell a pair of boots at higher than retail price because there were only a few listed. The fewer listings there are, the higher you can sometimes set a price. This applies more to “normal” items; you may have a hard time selling super unique items in which the inventory is low, but so is demand.

Same goes for Craigslist. Search Craigslist for similar items and price it around there. If you’re having a hard time finding similar items — say you’re in a smaller, more rural market — you can always search eBay and set a price based on what similar items are going for there.

Consider selling in lots. If you want to move a number of items quickly, consider selling stuff in lots instead of separately. So rather than selling a bunch of vintage magazines individually, offer them as a collection. Sure, you might make less money than you would have selling them by themselves, but you’ll likely get rid of them faster.

Be thorough in your description. The more detail you put into the description of your item the more likely it will sell. Note how old your item is, how often it’s been used, and any flaws it might have. Even if your item has a few dings in it, people will buy it if you’re upfront in the description. It shows the buyer you’re an honest seller, and in the online selling game your reputation is your most important commodity.

Edit and proofread your description. Make sure to run a spell check and grammar check on your listing. It makes you look more legit and boosts that all-important reputation.

Include plenty of quality pictures of the item. Rather than just including one, feature several images from different angles. Make sure you show any flaws or dings the item might have. Again, if the flaw is minor, it shouldn’t hurt you. The picture of the flaw only shows you’re an honest seller.

Also, make sure your pictures look good. They don’t have to be professional, but they shouldn’t look like you took them on a flip-phone from 2002. We could devote an entire post on how to take better pictures (maybe we will in the future), but in the meantime here are some quick and dirty tips for taking pictures that don’t suck:



  • Use a plain, uncluttered background. You want all the attention on your item, not on your messy nightstand in the background. White poster board makes for a great backdrop.


  • Don’t use the flash; use natural lighting. Flashes can give your images a really harsh look and cause all sorts of shadows. Instead, opt for natural light.


  • Fill the frame with the item. You want the item to take up about 80-90% of the frame. This gives buyers the best look possible.


  • Take close-ups. People like to see the details. Do this even for any blemishes or damage your item may have.



For books on Amazon, you don’t need to worry about posting pictures. When you enter the book’s title, Amazon will generate a book cover image for you.

Be prompt in answering questions. If you get a question from a bidder or potential buyer, answer it quickly. It shows you’re serious about selling your item and only increases your reputation. Plus, it’s just plain courteous. You wouldn’t believe how many people lose business in the online selling game just because they lack responsiveness.

On eBay, set your starting bid low. Low starting bids attract more buyers. Of course you should base your bids on the demand for the item. If it’s a high-demand product, starting low shouldn’t hurt you because more people will be competing for it. If your product is in low demand and you think you won’t get many bids, set the starting price closer to what you actually want to get for the item. This is why researching is so important.

Many power sellers on eBay recommend not using a reserve price (the lowest price you’re willing to accept for your item) because it just adds a fee to your listing ($3) that you have to pay even if you don’t sell the item. Many also recommend just starting your bid at $.99, the thinking being that even if you sell it for much less than you wanted, it’s better than just having that item sit on your shelf making you no money at all.

It’s a tough call, but I always erred on starting low so I could just get rid of the item.

Create a stellar title for your eBay and Craigslist listings. The first thing people will see when searching for an eBay or Craigslist item is the title. When deciding how to title your item, think like a buyer. What would you type in the search box if you were looking for this item? Use that as the starting point. List things like brand, color, condition, designers, and size. Don’t use all caps or excessive punctuation or gimmicks (like “$1 iPhone!!!!!” when really you’re selling it for a few hundred). That just annoys people and makes you seem suspicious or a few bricks short of a load.

Run a 10-day listing on eBay. If you start the bid on Thursday and run a 10-day auction, your bid will end on the Sunday of the following week. That means your item will be up for two weekends. More people surf and make purchases on eBay on the weekends, so having greater exposure will definitely help increase the bids.

Set a deadline on Craigslist. To encourage actual buyers and not tire kickers, set a firm deadline in your Craigslist listing like, “Needs to be picked up Monday,” or something like that.

Be upfront with shipping and handling. Make it clear who’s paying for shipping and handling. One of the biggest scams people run on eBay is selling an item for super cheap, but then charging $15 for shipping. You’ll encourage bids if you’re clear about how much shipping will be.

Some people use the strategy of providing free shipping. Especially for higher-priced items, you’re probably making a profit anyway, and the free shipping will likely attract more buyers.

For bigger items that you’re selling on Craigslist, let people know that you expect them to come pick up the item. If they need you to deliver, be up front that you’ll charge a bit extra.

Don’t use eBay add-ons. I haven’t found them to be very helpful. If you follow the tips in this article, you shouldn’t have to use them.

Ship fast and package well. As soon as the item sells or your auction is over, head down to the post office and send the package off. If it’s a fragile or delicate item, wrap it really well. This isn’t a time to cut corners; if the item breaks, you may be responsible. Buyers will rate you, and how you handle shipping will be taken into consideration. Ship fast to earn positive feedback and boost your reputation!

What if the item doesn’t sell? If your item doesn’t sell, consider relisting it at a lower price. If it still doesn’t sell at the lower price, cut your losses and just donate the item to Goodwill. Make sure you get a receipt — you want to get that tax deduction after all!

What are your tips for selling things online? Share your advice in the comment box!


http://www.artofmanliness.com/2015/06/03/tips-for-selling-your-stuff-online/
 

pitw

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Not sure this fit's but..........
I was setting at the computer at 2pm when I spied an ad for a '95 Ford F150, 300 6, 5 speed manual, 4x4 for $1,500 and the following ad was a '95 same thing except 2 wheel drive for $1,000, so I called the fellow 2.5 hours North of me. We chatted for a spell about the trucks when he told me he also had a '86 4x4, 300 6, 4 speed manual. That raised my attention level to a 10 as I love them trucks. So I asked what he'd take for all three if I was there in three hours. He said, "2,700" and I said I would bring $2,500 in cash and he wouldn't have to deal with anyone else, He agreed much to my surprise. I took the wife and boys up there and was pleasantly surprised at how much better in shape than I thought they would be. He kinda/sorta wanted to renege on the deal a mite but 25 $100 bills got the deal done. We dropped the '86 off at my oldest boys place which was only 14 miles away as my 14 year old can't legally drive on the roads but he made it there fine. Then off to Vermillion and I was driving the 2 wheel, Bobby's 4x4 needed gas so we pulled into the UFA cardlock and a farmer there came over saying how he was looking for a long box truck with no extended cab for his farm work.[Same reason I wanted the 4x4]. I told him for $1,600 and $100 for the gas I had put in he could have the blue 2 wheel drive. I drove him to 4 ATM's while he gathered cash and now have the two trucks I really wanted for $830 as I'd only put 30 litres in it.
95 4x4 with the 86 in the background.


This one sold.


Bobby say's the red one drives like a dream and everything works. The 86 purrs with it's carburetor but will require a $35 rear window. Man I like a good day.
 

searcher

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Nothing special............just a quick bump to the top.

How I got $45 out of the trash


https://youtu.be/tjZK1QSyGuo

Published on Jun 18, 2015
 
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agnut

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Hi all; I don’t know about you but life has been a whirlwind since the weather broke. Tractors, mowers, weed whackers, cars, computers, organizing and more have been demanding my attention like a pack of whining pups. Oh, and for the last few months I’ve been going to the dentist to have all my upper teeth pulled for an upper denture. Now having a tooth filled is a minor thing. Got the new dentures in 12 days ago and am still adjusting; doc says a couple more weeks and I should be ready to bite most anything.

I hadn’t been GEM hunting until the last couple of weekends. Here is a list of the booty from 6/12, 13 :

Black and Decker bench grinder $2
58 DVDs $10
Gibson Maestro guitar and amp $30
2 large table umbrellas free
Stihl weed whacker $2.50
New London Fog jacket $8
12 hats 25 cents each
3 pullover shirts 50 cents each
3 pair sweat pants 50 cents each
Large box of rope $5
Homedics neck massager $2
Airwalk hiking boots 50 cents
Small haul but still fun.


And here is the list from 6/19, 20 :

Compostumbler 18 bushel size for $50 (costs $600 new, $500 on sale)
12 quart enamel pot with lid $1
2 rolls heavy duty water hoses $5 each
New leather gloves $1
Oster blender $2
12 quart steamer pot $5
King comforter with pillow cases $5 Lady said it was $100 new.
Sears Eager 1 lawn mower free
Women’s leather boots $2
Women’s Ugg type boots $2
20 DVDs $10
Small water pump $2
3 shirts o25 cents each
Sidewalk gas edger $5
Coleman two way burner in box $5 ($50 new in store)
Coleman propane burner $1
Heavy duty router $20
And lots of little items for 5 to 10 percent of new price.

Lately I’ve noticed that even when I arrived before the sale opening times, buyers were walking out with armloads of items. Hey ! That’s cheating; Should I call the cops ?

Not all deals come about at GEM sales either. Yesterday I called a lady near me just to say hi and see how she was doing. She had just sold her house and was planning to move to somewhere in Oregon. She asked if I was interested in her semi antique Troy 6 HP tiller. Looked like something my grandfather would have used on the ranch. I said Sure, how much do you want for it ? To my surprise she said that I could have it for free ! My son and I hooked up the trailer and ran over and picked it up. This tiller was made before they learned to make everything out of beer cans and plastic. Built like a Missouri mule. It’ll probably outlive me.
She also has a spinet piano she offered for free but we just don’t have room for it. Sometimes too much isn’t such a good thing.

My daughters are coming from Florida in mid August. Gotta get the place looking presentable enough that they won’t photo it and put it up on some hoarder website. I’ve got stuff that I haven’t seen for 8 or 10 years. Somewhere……

Best wishes,
Agnut

"To laugh often and much; to win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children; to earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends; to appreciate beauty, to find the best in others; to leave the world a little better; whether by a healthy child, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is the meaning of success. "
Ralph Waldo Emerson
 

Brio

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I cabbaged a brass spitoon yesterday. Guy was going to put it on kijiji and I offered him a half sack of beer. Not worth much more but I like it.

 

agnut

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Hi all. Last Friday and Saturday I went garage sailing and picked up the typical load of small items such as a bag of light bulbs for free, shovels and brooms for a dollar. I won’t bore you with the details, it was a déjà vu all over again.

One purchase of note was that I saw a 4X4 platform in the rafters in a garage. I asked him if it was for sale and he enthusiastically said yes. How much ? $10. There was a lot of rope, tiedown cleats and four block and tackles. I bought it for my barn; maybe to use the block and tackles to hoist bicycles overhead They are in the way right now what with all the other items I have stacked around.

After having taken this platform down, there was a huge folded tarp in the rafters exposed which I asked about. He said that he didn’t know the condition and said that I could have it for one dollar. See how one thing leads to another ?

A few weeks ago a neighbor who was moving asked me if I was still interested in her 1970s Troy Built garden tiller. I said yes and asked how much she wanted for it. She said that I could have it for free for all the help I had been in the past. I already have a new Troy Built tiller but it is nothing like the beast these older ones are. They typically cost about $4-500 if you can find one. So I ran right over with my tilt trailer and picked it up.

A couple of weeks passed until last weekend when on Saturday at the last garage sale I spied another old Troy Built tiller sitting in the side yard. Turns out that I know these people, great folks. I asked the husband (is it still legal to use that term ? ) if it was for sale and he said that it was. I bought some items and left for home, not thinking more about the tiller.

That night I began thinking about the possible opportunity another tiller might offer. I couldn’t put it out of my mind, It was like something was urging me to get back over there and work a deal if It was still available.

Sunday morning I got up early and hooked up the trailer; thinking positive, I was going to get that tiller come Hell or high water. I parked around the corner, not knowing if I could turn around on the dead end street. I hiked up the steep driveway and saw that the tiller and all of the items for sale were still there.

There were no other buyers and I had the field to myself !

This tiller, unlike the one I already had, was an electric start version and came with an attachment I had not known existed, a power takeoff wood chipper. I got them both with a plow attachment for $350. Now I have the three tillers plus the Kronevator which is pulled behind my Kubota diesel tractor. Why so many tillers, you ask ? Well, besides our own needs for our field I figure I could loan them out and/or charge to till others’ fields and gardens in the future.

This man and his wife (is that term still legal too ?) do a lot of canning and he asked me if we saw any deer in our area. I said that we had a couple who were jumping the fence and eating in our orchard. He said that bow season starts Sept 1 and I said to come on over. He has a passion for deer jerky. I also just made a bottle of colloidal silver that his wife requested. It ain’t all about the dollars; it’s all about each other.

Recently I read that growing food will be the new gold. And having the equipment to do the hardest job will be in demand. I was told that tilling in the spring was expected in order to plant but was also told that tilling before winter was also a good idea, something I did not know. I still need to find out more about this. If so, twice the demand. The heavy duty Kronevator would be good for tearing up the blackberry bushes’ roots which are all over our area. I anticipate that folks may want to clear areas on their properties for planting veggies. I recall that in the last depression folks had gardens in their back yards. My three Troy Built tillers would be ideal for getting in and out of and handling such smaller areas. By the way, I expect that canning will also see a resurgence like in the last depression.

So much of our prep planning is founded upon a particular intensity of social and economic difficulties. At the low end is the tightening of available money and resources and the resultant necessary adjustments required; at the high end is the chaotic collapse and later stabilization of a much different world. In either scenario, people have to eat. The small farmer will be king. My acquiring equipment will hopefully add a demand for our services. Canning equipment shows up at garage and estate sales; not a bad idea to have a setup and knowledge of how to use it for the future. And some of you are probably thinking of stills too. Not a bad idea for the adventuresome.

Another thing I am looking for is a vertical mill and lathe in order to repair and make metal items. I have done this when I had such equipment a couple of decades ago. With a lathe and mill, the welders we already have we can repair most anything.

The overview of the aforementioned is that I have added a new skill and possible demand for bartering and horsetrading in the future. I feel better now and am now more aware of what other equipment I may need in order to be in demand.

Gee, do you think that when money collapses we might be using bartering and horsetrading instead ?

Best wishes,

Agnut

"On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be occupied by a downright fool and complete narcissistic moron."
-H.L. Mencken

Oppressing everyone to avoid oppressing anyone is the egalitarian ethos gone mad
.- Daniel Greenfield

You don't have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body. -C.S. Lewis
 

pitw

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Timing can be everything. Around here I'm known as the guy with lot's of little Nissan D21 pickups. On Monday a guy called and said his was still running but looked rough, it had two near new front tires. He asked if I would give him a $100 for it as he bought a smart car and wasn't going to use it anymore. I said sure and he even drove it out for me. Fast forward to yesterday [Tuesday] when I got a call from a guy who wanted a running D21 for a garbage/piss around truck. I said I had one for $500, so he was coming out right away. Barely had time to get the front tires off and replaced with some older ones before he got here. So I made $400 and two good tires by basically doing nothing.LOL
 

pitw

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I cabbaged a brass spitoon yesterday. Guy was going to put it on kijiji and I offered him a half sack of beer. Not worth much more but I like it.

I'd be willing to give you a full sack for that beauty. Got a lot of chewers out here on the prairies.LOL
 

agnut

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Hi again, crazy busy as usual. I stupidly thought retired life was supposed to be slow and borderline boring. Ain’t happened yet and won’t happen in the future either. I don’t know whether I’m braggin’ or complainin”. Anyhow, here is a list of the booty from last weekend :

FIRST SALE
20 DVDs $20
Belkin reading LED light $1
2 leather purses $1 each (no, no; for my daughters (that is, if my judgment is not too whacko)).
5 new straw cowboy hats $1 total (they were used for a rodeo night party)
3 LED 50 light sets, new in box. Price tag was $15.99 (plus sales tax, of course. Not edible, ya know) $1 each set
2 cookie trays free
1 rolling suitcase $2

SECOND SALE
Bluray player $10
Star Trek Bluray DVD $3

THIRD SALE
Wood kitchen stool
Vibram sole military boots $3
Oster blender $3
2 hammers 25 cents each
Black and Decker reversible ½” drill $5
2 Natural Cures Revealed books 50 cents each
Fossil designer leather purse $15 (again for my daughters. Really, ya gotta believe me !)
Heavy salt crystal lamp $3

FOURTH SALE
16 Harley Davidson T shirts $30
5 Harley Davidson dress shirts $75
1 pair leather Harley Davidson gloves $5
8 DVDs $8
Levi lined denim jacket, like new $10

2 more leather purses $1 each ( I can literally feel your skepticism now; thanks for the vote of confidence. They really, really ARE for my daughters. I have to admit that sometimes I could use a carry bag for all my loose junk. Women get a purse and we men get a fanny pack. What the Hell is that ? )

So that is all the stuff I found worthy of hauling home. The Harley shirts have been sold to a family member and the gloves were given to my niece.
Crazy as it must seem, I’m already using several of the above items (again, NOT THE PURSES ! I wish you would STOP suspecting me of being a cross dresser or worse. The closest I’ve ever been to wearing culottes was back when I wore bell bottom trousers. I will also admit to wearing a Nehru jacket one time but I was in southern Califonicate in the sixties. When in Rome, do as the Romans do; When in Calif, do as the locals do ? Come on in; the water’s fine (well, until Fukushima nuked our coastline in slow motion)). Boating is iffy, fishing is iffy; and for God’s sake if you are water skiing, don’t fall in.

A couple of days ago my son and I were making our semiannual haul to the trash dump where there is a nonprofit recycle center next door. I see it as the icing on the cake wherein we first dump the trash and then reload the truck with bargain goodies. The previous week I had asked that a composter be set aside until I could get down there to pick it up; I even called the day before to reaffirm that I would be coming soon and asked the worker to let the manager know. However, when I arrived, the composter had been sold that morning. The message was never conveyed. These composters cost $5-600 new and used ones for $50 sell like hotcakes.

I found some ½” US drill bits for 60 cents each. There was a worm drive Skil saw that had just been received and hadn’t been priced yet. I asked one of the workers there how much it would be and he said “how about $5 ?” It tested out quiet and smooth and had a fine tooth blade. This saw is about $140 at the local Home Depot store. You don’t have to guess what I did; I couldn’t get it into the truck fast enough.

Point here is to not be disappointed, frustrated or angry that things did not work out the way expected; for learning to be at peace with whatever unfolds in dealings facilitates a smooth flow through life as well. Who cares that the composter was sold through a miscommunication; another will show up or a better deal will show up like the Skil saw.

Best wishes,
Agnut

“So you think that money is the root of all evil? [...] Have you ever asked what is the root of money? Money is a tool of exchange, which can't exist unless there are goods produced and men able to produce them. Money is the material shape of the principle that men who wish to deal with one another must deal by trade and give value for value. Money is not the tool of the moochers, who claim your product by tears, or of the looters, who take it from you by force. Money is made possible only by the men who produce. Is this what you consider evil?”― Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged
 

pitw

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Got to go to a clean out the garage/yard sale. I think I missed a lot of good stuff by being the last one there, but I did manage to buy two 8 foot long church pews for $10 each. Got a 12 volt generator off an old tractor[that works] for a $1, a box of stuff that has an old tool I wanted and many useful things for another buck. Got an old Sears engine analyzer for $2. 4 6"x6"x12' beams for $5 and 8 6"x10' heavy steal pipes for $5. Found out from a buddy who went to the sale the first day that they wanted $250 each for the pews that I have now sold for $150. Used the engine anylyzer on my old massey 35 to set the points.
 

glockngold

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Yard sales have been winding down with just the "professional sellers" still at it, so bargains have been few & far between.

But yesterday , through a craigslist contact, I was buying mechanics tools from a fella at his home.
I had cherry picked his tool box clean of the stuff I wanted to keep or resell, & left behind what I felt was not going to bring much (like click style torque wrenches, non name brand pullers etc)
He excepted my price of $3K for that, then he looked at me & said "Would you give me an even $3500. for the box & everything in it?"
Damn straight I would...
Here's the box:


SNAP-On Box Classic 78 #3 003.jpg
 

the_shootist

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You stole it (but you already know that) Congrats!!!
Yard sales have been winding down with just the "professional sellers" still at it, so bargains have been few & far between.

But yesterday , through a craigslist contact, I was buying mechanics tools from a fella at his home.
I had cherry picked his tool box clean of the stuff I wanted to keep or resell, & left behind what I felt was not going to bring much (like click style torque wrenches, non name brand pullers etc)
He excepted my price of $3K for that, then he looked at me & said "Would you give me an even $3500. for the box & everything in it?"
Damn straight I would...
Here's the box:


View attachment 76655