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Bees

MattC

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#1
Trying my first hive, set it out at my farm in a couple acres of red clover. W'ell see how this goes, I am a little afraid of them, and my suit is too snug in the shoulders, probably sting right through.

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Goldhedge

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#3
If you are calm around them, they don't bother you. They sense fear...

Cool set up you have there MattC
 

Studiopaul

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#7
Mother is starting her new hive in England...dont think she would approve if i brought her home!!!! bbbbzzzzzzzz
 

Cassandra

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Good for you, Matt. I'm thinking of hosting a colony on our plot. A local guy who keeps bees was offering honey last year in exchange for us letting him place a hive on our lot. I think we'll look him up and take him up on the offer; colony collapse disorder is in the news again.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2010/may/02/food-fear-mystery-beehives-collapse

Fears for crops as shock figures from America show scale of bee catastrophe

The world may be on the brink of biological disaster after news that a third of US bee colonies did not survive the winter

Disturbing evidence that honeybees are in terminal decline has emerged from the United States where, for the fourth year in a row, more than a third of colonies have failed to survive the winter.

The decline of the country's estimated 2.4 million beehives began in 2006, when a phenomenon dubbed colony collapse disorder (CCD) led to the disappearance of hundreds of thousands of colonies. Since then more than three million colonies in the US and billions of honeybees worldwide have died and scientists are no nearer to knowing what is causing the catastrophic fall in numbers.

The number of managed honeybee colonies in the US fell by 33.8% last winter, according to the annual survey by the Apiary Inspectors of America and the US government's Agricultural Research Service (ARS).
 

goldie40

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#9
Trying my first hive, set it out at my farm in a couple acres of red clover. W'ell see how this goes, I am a little afraid of them, and my suit is too snug in the shoulders, probably sting right through.

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by the looks of the folage around there, you could toss the feeder, they should beable to forge on their own. I don't like the outside feeders,they draw preditors and encourage robbing. i use gallon paint pails with a few holes punched in the cover then places over the hole on the inner cover.then another brood chamber placed on top with the top cover placed on that.
Also if you're in Bear country, you may want to put up an eletric fence, solar powered if you're to far from ele. the wire has to be every 5 inches starting from the gd to about 4 ft up.I had some hives wiped out last summer while i was 60 feet from them and there was nothing i could do about it.

 
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goldie40

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#10
Good for you, Matt. I'm thinking of hosting a colony on our plot. A local guy who keeps bees was offering honey last year in exchange for us letting him place a hive on our lot. I think we'll look him up and take him up on the offer; colony collapse disorder is in the news again.

that's the best way to get honey, i like to see everyone keeping bees,but they can get real costly, I had some hives die off during the winter, it was over 400. for some new packages of bees.
 

obilly

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#11
put feeders in hive opening, that is where they are designed to go. one on each side opening in middle.

beelow is good book if you don't have it:

Hive and The Honey Bee

A thorough reference for all aspects of apiculture, 27 chapters, 33 authors, over 1,300 pages. Black and white, hard cover. References included.
 
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MattC

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#12
I know the boardman feeder goes in that hole, but I was worried the entrance reducer hole left would only be a 1/2 inch. Looked like a traffic jam!
 

goldie40

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#13
here is still the best way to feed bees other than just putting dry sugar on top of a news paper on top of the frames, i know that there are thousands of books written on how to keep bees and everyone has their own way, this is the best way i've found in my short 50 yrs of keeping them.

 

Lt Dan

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#14
Congrats on the bees, MattC. I used to want bees because I used a lot of honey, bought it by the gallon off a guy that had hives all over. When I found out I was a diabetic, I learned to eat unsweetened most of the time. Don't use hardly any sweetener of any kind anymore. Ya get used to natural flavors. A touch of honey is a treat now.
 

obilly

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#15
i ran into trouble with robber bees using the feeders external .i did not surper up a new hive until the hive body was pulled out,,,if they filled 7 frames out of the hive body and were working the the outer frames , thats when i added a super,,,,a good year i could get on 4 or 5 supers and get 10+ gallons out of 2 hives. you can also just harvest the hive body (brood box). you don't have to super.,, 10 hives was all i ever had...now i have developed a severe reaction to stings,,,,,so i don't mess with bees no more. i was stung probably 500 times over the years before i started to have a issue with stings. bees is good ,,,,honey is money,,,, at the time i was getting $25 a gallon. i always would mail order my bees 3lbs of bee and a marked queen delivered by the post office ,,,,it was always fun to go to the post office and pick up the bees,, i only fed them one time after that they were on their own.
 

AMforPM

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#16
Good luck with your bees. We need them. Africanized bees may end up being all the bees we have left if these diseases keep killing off honey bees. The 'killer bees' seem to be surviving, though that may just be that they are not cared for and their problems go unremarked.
 

gnome

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#17
Colony collapse no prob for organics

 
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#48Fan

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#18
Was just given a couple of hives from a friend. I know nothing about bees. Anyone have any bee wisdom for me?
 

glockngold

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#19
None at all, but please take photos for us.
With the price of honey in the store & the questionable sources, it's worth the effort.
especially with the free start up.
 

newmisty

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Uglytruth

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Guy from work called Saturday. Was mowing & they were under his driveway in the ditch. Took a box over placed it under the bees & dropped the whole cluster right into the box. Had 4 frames with drawn comb in there. Put a lid on & went home. Went back at 9PM when it was cooling down & every bee was inside. Closed the doors & took them home. Next day I added the rest of the frames & fed them a patty and some syrup & they seem to be doing fine. Will open in a week to see if I can find the queen or larva. Judging by the activity they are doing fine.

Lots of great bee books. Youtube videos. Read up and study depending on YOUR location. Study or contact other bee keepers / clubs in your area. Watch out for mites, beetles & wax moths. There are other issues also.
 

JayDubya

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#23
Was just given a couple of hives from a friend. I know nothing about bees. Anyone have any bee wisdom for me?
Sounds like a pretty shitty thing for your friend to do. He dropped a couple hives on somebody who "knows nothing about bees" and then doesn't make himself available for guidance, isn't there as a source of information/assistance.
 

Lt Dan

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#24
Practically everything I learned about my bees, I learned from working with them, or watching youtube videos and free online books and state ag sites.
Bees just mostly need a place to store their food and have their brood. When they fill the boxes they are in, it's time to add on. That's where using standard size boxes come in.
But those hive boxes do not look to me to be a standard size.
Most bee keepers around here use 10 frame boxes. I use 8 frame which are easier to handle when I have to work the hives.
Both 8 and 10 frame hive boxes are standard bee hives. A 5 frame is what is called a nuc, (for nucleus), I also use 5 frame for my swarm traps, except if I happen to see a swarm I can catch, I put them in one of my 8 frame hive bodies.

If you've got bees, that's half the battle. Bees are expensive to buy. Wish I knew more, always something to learn, but the bees are your teachers if you can read what they are telling you.
 

Uglytruth

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#25
What Lt Dan is saying is you need to give them room to expand so they will either split or leave. Your nuc's look to be 5 frames 2 boxes high. That's 10 frames or 1 normal size box. This time of year you need to be checking on them & adding more room so they can expand and still have stores.

Seems you need to see if you want to get into bees or not get into bees. Your going to need some equipment fast! Or call the local bee club I'm sure someone will take them. It's the right time of year. If you put it off you will be hindering them getting through winter depending on your location.
 

#48Fan

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#26
Sounds like a pretty shitty thing for your friend to do. He dropped a couple hives on somebody who "knows nothing about bees" and then doesn't make himself available for guidance, isn't there as a source of information/assistance.
Naw, it's not like that at all. My friend is a doctor and has been travelling all over the place so he's not around that much. He's going to help me with them, it's just he's not around much.

Yeah, those boxes are just 5 frame. I was thinking I will need bigger ones. I'll ask my buddy about that next time he swings by. Anyone know a quality, but affordable place to buy boxes?
 

Uglytruth

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#27
Get stuff from Better Bee, Blue Sky beekeeping, Dantant. Most are good to work with. Better get on them bigger boxes this time of year! Bees have their own schedule not yours! LOL

What area of the country do you live in? Bad winters or Texas? Dealing locally might cost an extra couple of bucks but the local knowledge that is free is worth it.
 

#48Fan

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#28
Get stuff from Better Bee, Blue Sky beekeeping, Dantant. Most are good to work with. Better get on them bigger boxes this time of year! Bees have their own schedule not yours! LOL

What area of the country do you live in? Bad winters or Texas? Dealing locally might cost an extra couple of bucks but the local knowledge that is free is worth it.
I'll check them out. Was just looking around the web to try and find some deals. I'm in northeast Texas.