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Breaking open 10yr dried veggies

Merlin

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#1
I have 5 quarts containing Flav-R-Pac Mixed Vegetables that I dehydrated from frozen on 2/22/2009. An oxygen absorber in each quart jar. My curiosity is killing me. Will they reconstitute in boiling water with soaking? I don't expect them to be anything like the fresh frozen veggies I started with nearly ten years ago. But I do want to see how they work in the Flav-R-Pac recipe for Easy Chicken A La King that I taped to the sides of the jars. How well could they work as survival food? Should I store up a fresh batch and have fun with the old stuff?

My dinner menu is pretty much set through tomorrow; but I'm fitting this experiment into the day after. I'll be back soon.
 

Merlin

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Viewed through the jar glass, they look good. Peas are green; corn is yellow; green beans are ... ugly. We'll see.
 

tigerwillow1

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I recently broke open six #10 cans of 40 year old freeze dried. The steaks were lousy and I threw them away. The breakfast sausage was a little chewy but perfectly edible and tasted good. The other 4 cans were all mixed entrees, like chicken ala king or beef stroganoff for example, and came out great.
 

newmisty

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#5
I've watched a bunch of this guys vids. He opens and eats rations. It's a trip. Enjoy!

1943 US Army Field Ration K Dinner Unit WW2 MRE Review Oldest Eaten & Cigarette Smoked Taste Test

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Steve1989MREInfo
Published on May 15, 2017

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Check out this still surprisingly edible WW2 K Ration Dinner! Essentially the original U.S. MRE, the K Ration was designed as an Initial-assault ration - an organized box of food, cigarettes, coffee, etc that a soldier could depend on when field kitchens were not available.

Many troops lost between 30-70 pounds during their tours due to not only the rigorous physical demands of WW2-combat, but also to the under-nourishing K Ration - where a full day's K Ration, if fully consumed, only provided approx 2,930 calories per day for a Breakfast, Dinner, and Supper Unit.

This K Ration Dinner from early 1943 production (correction at end of video thru lot code ID on main can) was an incredible find - and an exclusive rare look into a true historical time capsule of a truly pioneering era in Military Rations.

A little backstory on this video - it very well could have ended up never getting released (or having serious continuity issues) had I not saved a couple of each of those K-1 and K-2 biscuits for a Ration Reproduction Enthusiast. The biscuit eating scene where I turned the camera over ended up permanently corrupt on my computer, and I'd already wiped it from my chip..whoops! I hadn't realized it until 5 days later - had to re-shoot (and sadly consume half of each 1 K-1 and 1 K-2 leaving only 1 1/2 K-1's for the repro guy and 2 1/2 K-2's. No big deal - they have already found a good home for a fellow that is getting perfect measurements on the fully intact biscuits and he has a perfect replica formula to make the K-1's and currently working on a formula for the K-2's.) I decided to not re-shoot the cigarette scene because such a fine & rare experience should not be overly indulged. The other three are re hydrating in a humidor with a few others from previous rations. So if anyone is wondering, there ya go! Hope you folks enjoy the video! -Steve

 

Merlin

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#6
I recently broke open six #10 cans of 40 year old freeze dried. The steaks were lousy and I threw them away. The breakfast sausage was a little chewy but perfectly edible and tasted good. The other 4 cans were all mixed entrees, like chicken ala king or beef stroganoff for example, and came out great.
Don't you find the quality of the ending, eatable product, fully reconstituted and heated nicely is much superior with freeze dried opposed to dehydrated?
 

newmisty

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#8
They look good from here!
 

stAGgering

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Good job Merlin-eater !

I added to store bought OG chicken & rice soup; dried, canned, + oxygen absorber broccoli I grew 10 years ago.
Carrots too.
They taste great and have more texture than the canned soup.
Had ten year old dried teriyaki salmon I made & canned dry with 02 absorber.
Was fine for about a month after opening 1 qt container, kinda turned.
It then became Sally the Lab's post walk snack.
She hates it.

Have blueberries, carrots, broccoli, onion and garlic 10 yrs +.
All taste like I just pulled them from the dehydrator.
 

Merlin

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I have three tablespoons simmering on the stove right now. Curiosity killed the cat :)

Okay, here is product simmered for 15 minutes and soaked for 10.

It's a little chewy, though the flavor is outstanding (with salt and pepper and butter , LOL )
Maybe I should soak in cold water overnight. What say you, StAGgering? Anybody?
 

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newmisty

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I have three tablespoons simmering on the stove right now. Curiosity killed the cat :)
If you don't post for hours we'll send the medics.
 

Merlin

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If you don't post for hours we'll send the medics.
All kidding aside, they do not have great eye appeal; but I'm betting that, as part of the chicken ala king, they'll be fine. We'll find out Friday.
 

tigerwillow1

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Don't you find the quality of the ending, eatable product, fully reconstituted and heated nicely is much superior with freeze dried opposed to dehydrated?
I haven't tried dehydrated to make the comparison. Other than the lousy steaks, I was surprised how good the freeze dried stuff was.
 

engineear

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#15
I've watched a bunch of this guys vids. He opens and eats rations. It's a trip. Enjoy!

1943 US Army Field Ration K Dinner Unit WW2 MRE Review Oldest Eaten & Cigarette Smoked Taste Test

1,191,671 views

Steve1989MREInfo
Published on May 15, 2017

SUBSCRIBE 1M
Check out this still surprisingly edible WW2 K Ration Dinner! Essentially the original U.S. MRE, the K Ration was designed as an Initial-assault ration - an organized box of food, cigarettes, coffee, etc that a soldier could depend on when field kitchens were not available.

Many troops lost between 30-70 pounds during their tours due to not only the rigorous physical demands of WW2-combat, but also to the under-nourishing K Ration - where a full day's K Ration, if fully consumed, only provided approx 2,930 calories per day for a Breakfast, Dinner, and Supper Unit.

This K Ration Dinner from early 1943 production (correction at end of video thru lot code ID on main can) was an incredible find - and an exclusive rare look into a true historical time capsule of a truly pioneering era in Military Rations.

A little backstory on this video - it very well could have ended up never getting released (or having serious continuity issues) had I not saved a couple of each of those K-1 and K-2 biscuits for a Ration Reproduction Enthusiast. The biscuit eating scene where I turned the camera over ended up permanently corrupt on my computer, and I'd already wiped it from my chip..whoops! I hadn't realized it until 5 days later - had to re-shoot (and sadly consume half of each 1 K-1 and 1 K-2 leaving only 1 1/2 K-1's for the repro guy and 2 1/2 K-2's. No big deal - they have already found a good home for a fellow that is getting perfect measurements on the fully intact biscuits and he has a perfect replica formula to make the K-1's and currently working on a formula for the K-2's.) I decided to not re-shoot the cigarette scene because such a fine & rare experience should not be overly indulged. The other three are re hydrating in a humidor with a few others from previous rations. So if anyone is wondering, there ya go! Hope you folks enjoy the video! -Steve

Haha..the gum.."I'll pretend that didn't happen". The cigarette smelled like gardinia...maybe
the govt. added some hemp? Good find.
 

newmisty

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I have three tablespoons simmering on the stove right now. Curiosity killed the cat :)

Okay, here is product simmered for 15 minutes and soaked for 10.

It's a little chewy, though the flavor is outstanding (with salt and pepper and butter , LOL )
Maybe I should soak in cold water overnight. What say you, StAGgering? Anybody?
Looks like potpourri
 

engineear

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All kidding aside, they do not have great eye appeal; but I'm betting that, as part of the chicken ala king, they'll be fine. We'll find out Friday.
Find out Friday ? It'll take a few days to get the Hershey squirts?
Wife can't eat much fast food...goes through fast...ya know?
 

Merlin

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I think I've got a problem. After being soaked overnight in the frig, I simmered them for 15 minutes. They are still chewy. The flavor is good. And while I actually prefer the texture to the overcooked stuff that comes out of a can, my roomie doesn't like veggies in the first place. Maybe I can get away with it if I don't put too many in the ala king recipe. We won't find out today because I have legs and thighs that are going into the air fryer for dinner.
 

southfork

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#19
I recently broke open six #10 cans of 40 year old freeze dried. The steaks were lousy and I threw them away. The breakfast sausage was a little chewy but perfectly edible and tasted good. The other 4 cans were all mixed entrees, like chicken ala king or beef stroganoff for example, and came out great.
Well even though the steaks were lousy in times of need they would be palatable would they not? Or were they spoiled?
 

Merlin

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Wife can't eat much fast food...goes through fast...ya know?
If that's really true, then it's probably all the fast food fat that she's having trouble processing. I know I can't eat chicken-fried steak with gravy at the restaurant because it gives me the runs. Wouldn't know about most fast food for years because I find a good salad on the menus. Fast food joints are carrying salads these days :) Maybe your wife eats too many French fries? And then because her gall bladder isn't as young as it used to be, they "goes through fast."

Speaking of restaurants, my friends all lure me to La Carreta for dinner. Eating lo-carb in a Mexican restaurant is a challenge, I'll tell ya. I love a good Margarita. Any sugar in that? Then there's all the chips and salsa before the meals arrive. And the menu itself? Well, rice and bean portions are not huge; but they're there. And you can have anything you want as long as it's served in some form of tortilla. I found a grilled chicken and shrimp salad buried in the menu (that is really quite delicious); that's about it. Suggestions anyone? (As Merlin derails his own thread :)
 

Merlin

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Well even though the steaks were lousy in times of need they would be palatable would they not? Or were they spoiled?
When you say they were lousy, do you mean that they were tough or do you mean they didn't have good flavor? Or both, maybe. They didn't actually smell or taste "bad", did they?
 

southfork

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#22
Archives | 2006
Inside the Brooklyn Bridge, a Whiff of the Cold War

By SEWELL CHANMARCH 21, 2006
For decades it waited in secret inside the masonry foundations of the Brooklyn Bridge, in a damp, dirty and darkened vault near the East River shoreline of Lower Manhattan: a stockpile of provisions that would allow for basic survival if New York City were devastated by a nuclear attack.
City workers were conducting a regular structural inspection of the bridge last Wednesday when they came across the cold-war-era hoard of water drums, medical supplies, paper blankets, drugs and calorie-packed crackers -- an estimated 352,000 of them, sealed in dozens of watertight metal canisters and, it seems, still edible.
To step inside the vault -- a dank and lightless room where the walls are lined with dusty boxes -- is to be vividly reminded of the anxieties that dominated American life during the military rivalry with the Soviet Union, an era when air-raid sirens and fallout shelters were standard elements of the grade-school curriculum.
Several historians said yesterday that the find was exceptional, in part because many of the cardboard boxes of supplies were ink-stamped with two especially significant years in cold-war history: 1957, when the Soviets launched the Sputnik satellite, and 1962, when the Cuban missile crisis seemed to bring the world to the precipice of nuclear destruction.
"Civil defense agencies were building fallout shelters all over the country during the 1950's and stocking them with supplies of food and water and whatnot," said John Lewis Gaddis, a historian at Yale and a pre-eminent scholar of the cold war.
Continue reading the main story

"Most of those have been dismantled; the crackers got moldy a very long time ago. It's kind of unusual to find one fully intact -- one that is rediscovered, almost in an archaeological sense. I don't know of a recent example of that."
The Department of Transportation, which controls the bridge, has moved to secure the site while figuring out to do with the trove of supplies.
The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has been contacted to handle the drugs, which include bottles of Dextran, used to treat or prevent shock.
City workers commonly find coins or bottles when repaving streets, fixing water mains or probing sewer drains, said the transportation commissioner, Iris Weinshall. "We find stuff all the time, but what's sort of eerie about this is that this is a bridge that thousands of people go over each day," she said. "They walk over it, cars go over it, and this stuff was just sitting there."
The room is within one of the arched masonry structures under the main entrance ramp to the bridge, not far from the Manhattan anchorage. Three city officials gave a brief tour of the room yesterday -- taking care to step gingerly over broken glass and fallen wooden boards -- on the condition that the precise location not be disclosed, for security reasons.
The most numerous items are the boxes of Civil Defense All-Purpose Survival Crackers. Printed in block letters, on each canister, was information about the number of pounds (6.75), the number of crackers per pound (62) and the minimum number of crackers per can (419).

Joseph M. Vaccaro, a carpentry supervisor at the Transportation Department, estimated that there were 140 boxes of crackers -- each with six cans, for a total of some 352,000 crackers.
The officials would not open any of the supplies because of safety concerns over germs, but Mr. Vaccaro said that one of the canisters had broken open, and inside it, workers found the crackers intact in wax-paper wrapping.
Nearby were several dozen boxes with sealed bottles of Dextran, made by Wyeth Laboratories in Philadelphia. More mysterious were about 50 metal drums, made by United States Steel in Camden, N.J. According to the label, each was intended to hold 17.5 gallons and to be converted, if necessary, for "reuse as a commode." They are now empty.
For the officials who gave the tour, the discovery set off some strong memories. Judith E. Bergtraum, the department's first deputy commissioner, recalled air-raid drills -- "first it was under the desk and then it was in the hall" -- at Public School 165 in Queens. Russell Holcomb, a deputy chief bridge engineer, remembered watching Nikita Khrushchev pounding his shoe at the United Nations in 1960 on television.
Several of the boxes in the room have labels from the Office of Civil Defense, a unit of the Pentagon that coordinated domestic preparedness in the early 1960's. State and local governments often appointed their own civil-defense coordinators, said Graham T. Allison, a former assistant secretary of defense who teaches at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard.
Dr. Allison acknowledged that fallout shelters would probably have been ineffective in the event of nuclear war but that the precautions were comforting.
"At least people would think they were doing something, even if it didn't have any effect," he said.
In 1950, the city's Office of Civil Defense, the predecessor to today's Office of Emergency Management, was formed to prepare for a possible atomic attack. In 1951, during the Korean War, floodlights and barbed-wire barriers were set up on and around the city's bridges, and bridge operators were organized into defense batteries, as part of an overall civil-defense strategy aimed at deterring sabotage.
Mayor Robert F. Wagner, who served from 1954 to 1965, appointed several civil-defense advisers. In 1959, a federal report concluded that two hydrogen bombs dropped near the Brooklyn Bridge would kill at least 6.1 million people.
Kenneth T. Jackson, a historian at Columbia University and a former president of the New-York Historical Society, said he was curious about how the stockpile got there. "Is this a secret cache of supplies the city was trying to put together, without warning the community of a serious threat?" he asked.
"What surprises me," he added, "is that we have all these little nooks -- that in this huge city with people crawling everywhere, we can find rooms still filled with stuff, 50 years after the fact.
 

tigerwillow1

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#24
When you say they were lousy, do you mean that they were tough or do you mean they didn't have good flavor? Or both, maybe. They didn't actually smell or taste "bad", did they?
The steaks were tough and IMO didn't taste good. They weren't spoiled and I didn't suspect they'd lead to any illness. If I were seriously hungry and had no other option, no question I'd eat them. The process for reconstituting the steaks was different than the other 5 entrees I had. With all but the steaks, the process is to add the right amount of hot water and let it sit for a few minutes. With the steaks, I don't remember exactly, the process was to let them soak in water for many hours. Perhaps beef steaks just aren't good candidates for freeze drying?
 

SongSungAU

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#25
I've watched a bunch of this guys vids. He opens and eats rations. It's a trip. Enjoy!

1943 US Army Field Ration K Dinner Unit WW2 MRE Review Oldest Eaten & Cigarette Smoked Taste Test

1,191,671 views

Steve1989MREInfo
Published on May 15, 2017

SUBSCRIBE 1M
Check out this still surprisingly edible WW2 K Ration Dinner! Essentially the original U.S. MRE, the K Ration was designed as an Initial-assault ration - an organized box of food, cigarettes, coffee, etc that a soldier could depend on when field kitchens were not available.

Many troops lost between 30-70 pounds during their tours due to not only the rigorous physical demands of WW2-combat, but also to the under-nourishing K Ration - where a full day's K Ration, if fully consumed, only provided approx 2,930 calories per day for a Breakfast, Dinner, and Supper Unit.

This K Ration Dinner from early 1943 production (correction at end of video thru lot code ID on main can) was an incredible find - and an exclusive rare look into a true historical time capsule of a truly pioneering era in Military Rations.

A little backstory on this video - it very well could have ended up never getting released (or having serious continuity issues) had I not saved a couple of each of those K-1 and K-2 biscuits for a Ration Reproduction Enthusiast. The biscuit eating scene where I turned the camera over ended up permanently corrupt on my computer, and I'd already wiped it from my chip..whoops! I hadn't realized it until 5 days later - had to re-shoot (and sadly consume half of each 1 K-1 and 1 K-2 leaving only 1 1/2 K-1's for the repro guy and 2 1/2 K-2's. No big deal - they have already found a good home for a fellow that is getting perfect measurements on the fully intact biscuits and he has a perfect replica formula to make the K-1's and currently working on a formula for the K-2's.) I decided to not re-shoot the cigarette scene because such a fine & rare experience should not be overly indulged. The other three are re hydrating in a humidor with a few others from previous rations. So if anyone is wondering, there ya go! Hope you folks enjoy the video! -Steve

Thanks for that, Newmisty. I watched him taste the things in that 1943 MRE. He's got some guts, for sure. then I read some of the YouTube comments made by other viewers. This one had me cracking up:
Mike W. Dash
10 months ago (edited)
"That's not rancid at all. Oh wait, if it is, it's mildly. I don't think so, I think it's just fine. Oh yeah, it has, yeah, it's swelling up my mouth a little bit. Yeah, I'm going color blind in my left eye. Now I can see dead people, it's a really weird sensation. I think my hair might be turning into butterflies. Oh yeah, I definitely need a doctor. Yeah."
Of course he was adding quite a bit to what the guy in the video actually said. But it cracked me up.
 

Merlin

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#26
Peas fresh from the garden. Frozen. Canned. Dehydrated. My order of preference.

I have never tasted freeze-dried peas. But I'd bet money they're better than canned. Just below Frozen?

And, compared to fresh from the garden, canned and dehydrated are lousy in my book.
 

Merlin

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The steaks were tough and IMO didn't taste good. They weren't spoiled and I didn't suspect they'd lead to any illness. If I were seriously hungry and had no other option, no question I'd eat them. The process for reconstituting the steaks was different than the other 5 entrees I had. With all but the steaks, the process is to add the right amount of hot water and let it sit for a few minutes. With the steaks, I don't remember exactly, the process was to let them soak in water for many hours. Perhaps beef steaks just aren't good candidates for freeze drying?
This cuts right to the heart of the matter. For me, food reserves are a bit like my precious metals. They are insurance against hard times. Except I think it is wise to learn how to cook with them and to rotate stock. I read one suggestion to grind my dehydrated veggies to flour and add them to soups and breads. And I honestly think these soaked and cooked veggies would be good if I drained and seasoned them and sprinkled them lightly over my tossed salads after chilling in the refrigerator.

I do not remember who at GIM posted this; but he wrote that unless something had obviously gone unsafe bad, he wasn't throwing any stored food away. During hard times my picky roommate and I might learn to appreciate dehydrated veggies.
 

Someone_else

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#28
Recently, my wife has made chili with stored meat I canned seven years ago (Feb 2012). These were pint canning jars I got on sale at Walmart ("Better Homes"), and seemed a bit less substantial than Ball or Kerr. The first chili had one jar of my antelope and bacon. The top had meat not covered at the top, but it tasted fine. The chili came out fine. The second chili had two jars of my chicken that I got from Walmart ($7 for ten pounds). These had a thick layer of fat at the top. The chili was fine. In both cases, the jars had a good vacuum and no bad smell. I think if something went wrong, seven years would have created some really bad evidence of spoilage.

Seventy cents a pound is a good deal, but it takes time and effort to get the meat off the bones. When I cook the chicken quarters in the pressure cooker, the meat comes off the bones easily, but I have a lot of extra liquid. Maybe I can separate the easy chicken meat for canning and use the broth for soups. Well, however I do it, it must be easier and cheaper than how the previous generations did it.
I do not remember who at GIM posted this; but he wrote that unless something had obviously gone unsafe bad, he wasn't throwing any stored food away.
One thing that gets my goat is when someone wastes food. That should be named as a minor crime, like a parking ticket (misdemeanor with a small penalty.)
 

newmisty

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Thanks for that, Newmisty. I watched him taste the things in that 1943 MRE. He's got some guts, for sure. then I read some of the YouTube comments made by other viewers. This one had me cracking up:
Mike W. Dash
10 months ago (edited)
"That's not rancid at all. Oh wait, if it is, it's mildly. I don't think so, I think it's just fine. Oh yeah, it has, yeah, it's swelling up my mouth a little bit. Yeah, I'm going color blind in my left eye. Now I can see dead people, it's a really weird sensation. I think my hair might be turning into butterflies. Oh yeah, I definitely need a doctor. Yeah."
Of course he was adding quite a bit to what the guy in the video actually said. But it cracked me up.
Yeah, I've been very impressed with what he's eaten in other not so well preserved rations. He's be like, "Oh yeah, thats really spoiled. Smells rancid and fowl. I'm not gonna try that." 5 seconds later..."I've gotta try that" and takes a bite. Must have a hell of am immune system by now.
 

Merlin

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#30
OK, here it is, the Chicken Ala King that oh-so-effectively hides the dehydrated veggies.

IMG_0238.jpg

And, to be very honest with you, it was very tasty. Survival food doesn't have to be bad. This wasn't even made with fresh chicken; it was canned light and dark meat from Always Save.

By the way, that isn't even a dinner plate -- it is a sandwich plate, my latest strategy for giving myself a full plate of food without pigging out :)
 
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newmisty

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#31
They cleaned up nice. Let us know if you start hallucinating.
 

newmisty

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#33
This episode just popped up in my feed.

In this one Steve eats 118 year old beef!

 

Merlin

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#34
You guys are having a lot of fun here. I'm just impressed that I could demonstrate through personal experience that it is possible to dehydrate food, store it with oxygen absorbers, and enjoy a meal ten years later. A side benefit, so far unmentioned, is that the dehydrated veggies occupy a lot less space than the frozen batch I started with. That quart jar contained 72 oz of frozen veggies before dehydrating -- 24 servings of 2/3 cup. A real power house in that quart jar. And, no there were no hallucinogenic effects :)
 

Merlin

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#35
A side and final note to the story: I used up the leftover cup or so of chicken ala king, together with a leftover 1/3 can of cream of chicken soup and 1/3 cup of skim milk (reconstituted from powdered) and made myself some delicious soup. And, hallelujah! the green beans (those ugly twisted beans) are now fully plumped up. In the future, I'm going to soak my dehydrated veggies in the refrigerator for a couple of days before using. See all that I have learned!

End of story. I think.
 

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#36
Thanks, merlin. There's an enhancement to the taste of freeze dried foods; when yer outside and yer hungry — They're delicious — very same thing inside at the dinner table — it's food, meh.

in my experience
BF
 

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#37
We are still eating 12 yo dehydrated mushrooms I picked on the west side of pikes peak. They still taste great! Im almost out, time to plan another trip I guess........
 

newmisty

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#38
We are still eating 12 yo dehydrated mushrooms I picked on the west side of pikes peak. They still taste great! Im almost out, time to plan another trip I guess........
There's a fungus among us.
 

newmisty

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#40
Sub-threshhold dosing kicks ass. One day ill be as smart as terrence mckenna.
Yep. A free, natural alignment tool for the soul and body.