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edsl48

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Here is a pot stock that is pretty interesting and Motley Fools blah on it. It has had phenomenal dividend growth and to me their business model makes sense. DYOD because most of my stock pics don't do very well.

Innovative Industrial Properties offers growth and a dividend
Analysts weren't thrilled with Innovative Industrial Properties' fourth-quarter report because it came in below expectations, even though the company nearly doubled every positive metric over the prior year.

So much is expected of IIP that it is finding itself a hard act to follow. That's a good thing, because it gives investors a chance to buy in on a booming company at a reasonable price. The stock is up 123% over the past 12 months, but it's down more than 18% over the past month.


IIP is a Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT) that specializes in leasing space to cannabis companies. The company generally buys a medical marijuana company's property and then leases it back, giving the tenant much-needed capital that is hard to come by because of federal laws that complicate banking operations regarding cannabis companies.

IIP's leases are long-term (10 or 20 years) absolute-net agreements, meaning the tenant bears all the costs for the facilities' maintenance. In the fourth quarter the company said it collected 100% of its contracted rent, and it has not had to offer rent deferrals since this past July.

In 2020 the company reported $116.9 million in revenue, net income of $64.4 million, and adjusted funds from operations (AFFO) of $97.8 million, year-over-year improvements of 162%, 191% and 180%, respectively.

On top of that, IIP has a great dividend growth record. It raised its quarterly dividend 6% in December to $1.24 a share, giving it a yield of 2.8% at its current price. The company has raised its dividend nine times since its IPO in 2016.



IIPR DATA BY YCHARTS
 

solarion

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One "option" for the less risk averse is to sell naked put contracts. While this used to be only a moderately profitable concept, the collapse of fees on contracts and very low margin rates at the better do-it-yourself brokers makes this geeky option more appealing. The potential returns are extremely high and risk can be managed with a great deal of granularity by carefully selecting strike/time premiums.

Another caveat is that the overpriced equity market is going to, and is in the process of...shifting away from historically expensive equities to a more value centered model(IOW sanity). If/when commodities and more specifically commodity money and the associated stocks again gain widespread favor, the assets underlying specific puts sold into a market hungry for them could be, themselves very attractive.

Here's a sample of a naked put sold on Endeavour silver(EXK), currently trading at 5.68.

The options here are limited as there are few offer strikes(asks) available on this cheap stock, but the best option imo features the Apr16'21 put with a strike of 5. The ROI is actually a bit lower than this, depending on your fee structure paid to sell the new put, but as I said those fees are very low at many of the better brokers these days. Interactive brokers is pictured here with a fee .65 / contract it's very reasonable.

1616285424213.png


For those that don't trade options or write contracts, be not afraid of the limited upside and near unlimited downside. Selling a naked put is a neutral to bullish action. Here the "doomsday" scenario associated with the max loss on this high IV equity is that the buyer of the put forces you to pay 500 bucks in exchange for 100 shares of endeavor silver. ...not exactly a horrible fate, and since you've already collected $24.35(25 - 0.65 fee) the final cost of those shares is 475.65 *IF* the share price of EXK drops to 5 or less within 27 days. Not a bad deal at all frankly. One can do this with multiple contracts or underlying assets simultaneously over and over during a year to stack outsized gains with very tightly controlled risk.

1616285980140.png


This was calculated with a 1% margin rate.

Note: This strategy is sensitive to price paid, so returns will be much lower for those lacking an abundance of patience. I like to target ask price less a penny, though some naked puts can take some while to execute in illiquid underlying assets.
 
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EO 11110

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solarion - i really need to revisit that. i started to dig into it several years ago and put it away. there's a lot to digest in options trading.

i'm absolutely killing it on my day/swing trading of stocks. started the test of my system on Christmas eve - the results have far exceeded my wildest expectations. still consider it in the testing stage, but slowly ramping up the size of the trades on the heels of the early results

since Christmas eve i've made about 130 trades with about 120 winners. right now i'm on an approx 40 trade winning streak, all in march

i total up the profit/losses every month and consider the profits as monthly 'trading dividends' - adding the total to the regular dividends in my dividend log

i would post some details about what i'm doing - but after learning that nyc vipers troll message boards for investing ideas, i'm not going to do that.

if any long-time gim2 members are interested in some of the details, pm me

the zero commission world has juiced my returns - if i had to pay 10 dollars in and 10 dollars out, the results would not be as good as they are
 

solarion

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Nice. Yeah PM me and we can compare notes. I haven't traded any paper crap in years, but a friend has me managing funds after firing her incompetent idiot broker and I may just tack onto it given the crazy low fees anymore. Another possibility is stacking shares of covered call ETFs via naked put selling. This would be a brilliant way to obtain a large semi-permanent position in some of the highest yielding equity vehicles around.

1616291481776.png


May 21 '21 naked puts with a 19 strike sold into the market at an ask of .40 could yield just shy of 40 bucks per while "risking" 1900. With this one there actually is some genuine risk because they've stacked nasdaq 100 assets to write covered calls against. The underlying assets are likely going to get kilt in the near term, but if they know what they're doing the yield should keep rising as their underlying assets fall. This one is not for me at this time, but if I were looking for pure long term income...stacking this thing at a price 15%+ lower doesn't seem like the worst fate.
 

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i wish i knew more about the covered call game - so could comment on your above post. if i say anything it will hurt more than help

i'll send you a pm, probably later tonight, when i have a little quiet time
 

solarion

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Covered calls are simply calls written against assets held. That ETF does that to generate yield so it's mostly irrelevant for ETF holders. I wouldn't be delighted to stack shares of the ETF at these prices despite the very respectable yield, but 3.5 lower? Yeah...maybe. It's the kind of thing I may stack in bunches when I'm even older and crankier than I am currently. lol
 

Voodoo

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Nice. Yeah PM me and we can compare notes. I haven't traded any paper crap in years, but a friend has me managing funds after firing her incompetent idiot broker and I may just tack onto it given the crazy low fees anymore. Another possibility is stacking shares of covered call ETFs via naked put selling. This would be a brilliant way to obtain a large semi-permanent position in some of the highest yielding equity vehicles around.

View attachment 205132

May 21 '21 naked puts with a 19 strike sold into the market at an ask of .40 could yield just shy of 40 bucks per while "risking" 1900. With this one there actually is some genuine risk because they've stacked nasdaq 100 assets to write covered calls against. The underlying assets are likely going to get kilt in the near term, but if they know what they're doing the yield should keep rising as their underlying assets fall. This one is not for me at this time, but if I were looking for pure long term income...stacking this thing at a price 15%+ lower doesn't seem like the worst fate.

I wrote my first puts earlier this year and pocketed nice cash. The problem was it tied up a good amount of cash. It was still like a 20% return in 2 weeks, on the first one. The second tied up like 4 grand for a month.
 

Mujahideen

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I’m rebuilding my monthly paying dividend portfolio. Been looking hard at qyld and thinking about going max margin on it to take advantage of the insanely low interest rates.

while I don’t think it would actually backfire since it would have to drop more than its ever dropped to get a margin call, I do still see it as risky.

then I found $NUSI, it’s the same thing as $QYLD but they buy a protective put so slightly lower yield, but it’s pretty much protected from a sudden dramatic crash. Essentially margin call proof.

D1606A2A-84DA-4642-85A0-5434DBC6B28E.jpeg



nusi is about 7.74% paid monthly

Then it hit me, just wait for a market crash to hit qyld, trade out protected nusi, buy the crashed qyld... or not. Maybe I’m wrong but that seems like a nice setup for a swap if you time it right.
 
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solarion

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Indeed, there's nothing stopping one from covering their own naked put written and sold into the market by buying a put of their own with a lower strike(and premium). In this scenario the purchased put would gain value if/when the underlying asset blew by the strike of both contracts and you were stuck purchasing 100 shares of the underlying at the higher strike of the formerly naked put you were forced by the buyer to acquire. This is called a bull put spread, aka short put spread aka put credit spread. ...and yes it'd be better if people could just agree on one name. You still make good returns with near zero risk, but profits suffer.

I do not find this optimal and prefer instead to simply focus on contracts written against underlying assets and strikes that would not make me cry if I were forced to buy them. IE things I'd consider stacking at those prices anyway...hey, might as well be paid to do so right? Take SAND here for instance...

1616316984459.png


Relatively low time premium puts written and sold into the market at a strike around 5.5 or 6 may not make a whole bunch of bank, but given the congestion around these variable duration averages, I don't consider this play all that risky either. Again, might as well be paid for doing that which one may otherwise do anyway.
I wrote my first puts earlier this year and pocketed nice cash. The problem was it tied up a good amount of cash. It was still like a 20% return in 2 weeks, on the first one. The second tied up like 4 grand for a month.
Correct. Your broker will tie up the funds necessary to obtain the underlying at the strike specified in the naked put you wrote and sold. This is why one must choose one's target carefully. Doing this with google for instance could tie up > 2000*100 = 200k for the duration of the naked put. Obviously your broker will not allow this unless you're well capitalized, but it's always something to keep in mind as it can dramatically affect returns.

This is why also, given the time value of funny munny the potential annualized return is determined by the strike, and therefore the price of the underlying asset. Targeting relatively inexpensive stocks, such as EXK and SAND, can alleviate this problem for those with modestly funded trading accounts. Certainly, given the relatively complexity of some of these strategies it's best to start out risking smaller amounts.

Other targets I'm currently considering given the right chart patterns are SILJ, WPM, and FNV. Hey, I like miners, streamers and the royals. :)

I hope I don't have to remind anyone that this is not trading advice, and I'm not suggesting anyone do these things without consulting someone qualified to advise or fully understanding the strategies involved. Please do not blame me if you try this and get burned.
 

solarion

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Perhaps even more amusing given that funds are tied up for only 5 days.

1616322466785.png
 

edsl48

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I’m rebuilding my monthly paying dividend portfolio. Been looking hard at qyld and thinking about going max margin on it to take advantage of the insanely low interest rates.

while I don’t think it would actually backfire since it would have to drop more than its ever dropped to get a margin call, I do still see it as risky.

then I found $NUSI, it’s the same thing as $QYLD but they buy a protective put so slightly lower yield, but it’s pretty much protected from a sudden dramatic crash. Essentially margin call proof.

View attachment 205146


nusi is about 7.74% paid monthly

Then it hit me, just wait for a market crash to hit qyld, trade out protected nusi, buy the crashed qyld... or not. Maybe I’m wrong but that seems like a nice setup for a swap if you time it right.


I have held QYLD for some time now and have been overall happy with it. It was recently featured by Investor's Business Daily in an article on investing for income in retirement:

The Role QYLD Can Play In Your Retirement Savings​

Global X Nasdaq 100 Covered Call ETF (QYLD): The fund's payouts include income from covered call writing, says Don Calcagni, chief investment officer of Mercer Advisors, in Denver. Covered call writing involves options for stocks or indexes. That strategy works best in a rising stock market. An investor — such as the ETF — buys a stock and at the same time sells the stock's potential price gain above a specific price to another investor. The investor originally buying the stock keeps any price gain up to the agreed-to threshold, or strike price. The second investor, who buys the option, gets any gain above the strike price.
For the right to get any gain above the strike price, the second investor pays a "premium." Mutual funds and ETFs pass those premiums through to shareholders as income. That can provide retirement income.
  • 12-month yield: 11.28% (highest yield in this analysis)
  • Trailing 1-year total return: 9.65%
  • 3-year avg. ann. return (on price): 9.33%
  • 3-year standard deviation: 14.38

 

solarion

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...and were I you I'd be considering buying a put against those shares here.

On the other hand if I had no current position in QYLD and wanted some income bearing yield going forward, selling a nekkid put seems a great way to stack some if it drops a bit, or a great way to get some yield if it doesn't.
 

Voodoo

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...and were I you I'd be considering buying a put against those shares here.

On the other hand if I had no current position in QYLD and wanted some income bearing yield going forward, selling a nekkid put seems a great way to stack some if it drops a bit, or a great way to get some yield if it doesn't.

I really screwed up a Bull debit spread on GME the past 2-3 weeks. Great timing, terrible trading. I bought a $500 call and sold the highest $800 call against it, This was practically free cause the $500 were like $2.6 and the $800 were $2.10. For some reason these new Robinhood traders just buy the most OTM calls. Huge demand for those compared to the 50 next better strikes. Well then the stock started to take off. I tried closing the spread for $75 as a stink bid and it didn't get close of course. Well, then as the stock really started taking off I sold off my winner and kept the loser, dumb. I sold the $500 calls for $27 or so for 10x, good right? No. those proceeded to run to $100+ as the IV exploded. I held the two $800 calls (i did have shares so they aren't naked) and I would have been happy to sell my shares at $800. But then I got nervous and somewhat panic closed one of the $800 calls at like $70. Oops. I did not want to be tied up if the stock spiked last week or this next week and I couldn't sell. So, all in all I lost probably $2000 ignoring the stock gain (which is still large). Lessons learned.
 

solarion

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Live and learn right? Putting those feisty limit orders in for good execution can really come back and bite you at times when dealing with violently expanding IV. I've stayed out of the whole GME debacle entirely...merrily stacking physical metals. Were I to play around at this point I'd probably set up a calendar call spread and hope for the best. Frankly that thing could go either way at any point though, so perhaps a risk reversal play would be a better strategy where you buy a call and sell a put near the money. Well the best thing to do is stay the hell away really. lol
 

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Also watching MO. It's been easing down. Read the earnings call transcript, sounded solid, starting a 2 billion dollar share repurchase program and continuing to pay that monster dividend. Covid mania didnt hurt their sales at all.

And now it has jumped. I was thinking I might add to it if it dipped below 40; now at over 50 I am thinking of shedding a few shares. It goes ex-dividend on Wednesday, I think...I'll see where it is on Thursday...
 

EO 11110

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And now it has jumped. I was thinking I might add to it if it dipped below 40; now at over 50 I am thinking of shedding a few shares. It goes ex-dividend on Wednesday, I think...I'll see where it is on Thursday...

seen that too - wish i had a bigger position, i might sell a little too. i'm holding for the income
 

Jarrod32

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seen that too - wish i had a bigger position, i might sell a little too. i'm holding for the income
Yeah, it's a tough call. Biggest thing giving me pause on selling is that there really isn't any better place to put the money...
 

edsl48

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Some investment porn on dividend stocks from Investor's Business Daily today...DYOD!!!


IBD screened for stocks offering more than the S&P 500's 1.6% dividend yield, while outperforming the index over the past five years. That's a high bar, which relatively few stocks meet, especially given choppy stock markets in the past year.

Both share-price increases and attractive payouts play a part in successful dividend investing.

Best Dividend Stocks For 2021: Top 5​

SymbolYield Five-year return
S&PSPY1.5%90%
Best BuyBBY2.3274
Texas InstrumentsTXN2.3213
BroadcomAVGO3.0204
JPMorgan ChaseJPM2.4152
T. Rowe PriceTROW2.5133
For investors looking for the best dividend stocks to buy and hold in 2021, several metrics matter.

Dividend stability reflects a long and steady track record of payouts. Dividend growth points to a company in sound financial health, working hard to make its stock more attractive to new and existing income investors.

A company with stable earnings is more likely to pay steady — and perhaps rising — dividends. The quality of earnings matters too.

The dividend payout ratio (dividend per share divided by earnings per share) can help you assess whether the dividend is sustainable. A ratio greater than 100% may warn of a potential cut.

Not all dividend stocks are smart investments. Use the information below as a starting point for your own research.



Best Dividend Stocks: Best Buy​

The tech retailer has paid regular dividends since 2004.

Dividend yield: Best Buy stock has a $2.80 annual dividend, yielding 2.3%.

Five-year return: BBY delivered a 274% compound stock market return over the past five years (not including reinvested dividends), vs. 90% for the S&P 500, as tracked by SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY).

Dividend growth rate: 19%, measured over the past five years.

Dividend stability factor: 17, on a scale from zero (most stable) to 99 (most volatile), measured over the past five years.

Dividend payout ratio: 36%.

Earnings stability factor: 4, on a scale from zero (most stable) to 99 (least stable). Best Buy grew earnings per share (EPS) an average 18% over the past three years, the IBD Stock Checkup tool shows.


Best Dividend Stocks: Texas Instruments​

The chipmaker boasts 16 years in a row of growing dividends. It first declared a dividend in April 1962.

Dividend yield: Texas Instruments stock bears a $4.08 annual dividend, yielding 2.3%.

Five-year return: 213%.

Dividend growth rate: 23%.

Dividend stability factor: 3.

Dividend payout ratio: 64%.

Earnings stability factor: 7. Over the past three years, Texas Instruments grew EPS 5% annually.



Best Dividend Stocks: Broadcom​

The semiconductor and enterprise software maker has grown dividends nine years in a row.

Dividend yield: Broadcom stock offers a $14.40 annual dividend per share, for a 3% yield.

Five-year return: 204%.

Dividend growth rate: 72%.

Dividend stability factor: 19.

Dividend payout ratio: 159%.

Earnings stability factor: 4. Over the past three years, Broadcom grew EPS 7% annually.



Best Dividend Stocks: JPMorgan Chase​

The banking giant has paid dividends for more than 20 consecutive years and grown dividends for 10 straight years.

Dividend yield: JPMorgan Chase stock provides a $3.60 annual dividend, for a 2.4% yield.

Five-year return: 152%.

Dividend growth rate: 19%.

Dividend stability factor: 6.

Dividend payout ratio: 41%.

Earnings stability factor: 12. Over the past three years, JPMorgan grew EPS 3% annually.



Best Dividend Stocks: T. Rowe Price​

The global investment manager first paid a dividend in 1986.

Dividend yield: T. Rowe Price stock provides a $4.32 annual dividend, for a 2.5% yield.

Five-year return: 133%.

Dividend growth rate: 9%.

Dividend stability factor: 16.

Dividend payout ratio: 38%.

Earnings stability factor: 4. Over the past three years, T. Rowe grew EPS 16% annually.

 

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Yeah, it's a tough call. Biggest thing giving me pause on selling is that there really isn't any better place to put the money...

cant help but wonder if the newly announced stock buyback isn't what's driving it up. if i were smart i would sell some, buy back cheaper
 

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Some investment porn on dividend stocks from Investor's Business Daily today...DYOD!!!


IBD screened for stocks offering more than the S&P 500's 1.6% dividend yield, while outperforming the index over the past five years. That's a high bar, which relatively few stocks meet, especially given choppy stock markets in the past year.

Both share-price increases and attractive payouts play a part in successful dividend investing.

Best Dividend Stocks For 2021: Top 5​

SymbolYield Five-year return
S&PSPY1.5%90%
Best BuyBBY2.3274
Texas InstrumentsTXN2.3213
BroadcomAVGO3.0204
JPMorgan ChaseJPM2.4152
T. Rowe PriceTROW2.5133
For investors looking for the best dividend stocks to buy and hold in 2021, several metrics matter.

Dividend stability reflects a long and steady track record of payouts. Dividend growth points to a company in sound financial health, working hard to make its stock more attractive to new and existing income investors.

A company with stable earnings is more likely to pay steady — and perhaps rising — dividends. The quality of earnings matters too.

The dividend payout ratio (dividend per share divided by earnings per share) can help you assess whether the dividend is sustainable. A ratio greater than 100% may warn of a potential cut.

Not all dividend stocks are smart investments. Use the information below as a starting point for your own research.



Best Dividend Stocks: Best Buy​

The tech retailer has paid regular dividends since 2004.

Dividend yield: Best Buy stock has a $2.80 annual dividend, yielding 2.3%.

Five-year return: BBY delivered a 274% compound stock market return over the past five years (not including reinvested dividends), vs. 90% for the S&P 500, as tracked by SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY).

Dividend growth rate: 19%, measured over the past five years.

Dividend stability factor: 17, on a scale from zero (most stable) to 99 (most volatile), measured over the past five years.

Dividend payout ratio: 36%.

Earnings stability factor: 4, on a scale from zero (most stable) to 99 (least stable). Best Buy grew earnings per share (EPS) an average 18% over the past three years, the IBD Stock Checkup tool shows.


Best Dividend Stocks: Texas Instruments​

The chipmaker boasts 16 years in a row of growing dividends. It first declared a dividend in April 1962.

Dividend yield: Texas Instruments stock bears a $4.08 annual dividend, yielding 2.3%.

Five-year return: 213%.

Dividend growth rate: 23%.

Dividend stability factor: 3.

Dividend payout ratio: 64%.

Earnings stability factor: 7. Over the past three years, Texas Instruments grew EPS 5% annually.



Best Dividend Stocks: Broadcom​

The semiconductor and enterprise software maker has grown dividends nine years in a row.

Dividend yield: Broadcom stock offers a $14.40 annual dividend per share, for a 3% yield.

Five-year return: 204%.

Dividend growth rate: 72%.

Dividend stability factor: 19.

Dividend payout ratio: 159%.

Earnings stability factor: 4. Over the past three years, Broadcom grew EPS 7% annually.



Best Dividend Stocks: JPMorgan Chase​

The banking giant has paid dividends for more than 20 consecutive years and grown dividends for 10 straight years.

Dividend yield: JPMorgan Chase stock provides a $3.60 annual dividend, for a 2.4% yield.

Five-year return: 152%.

Dividend growth rate: 19%.

Dividend stability factor: 6.

Dividend payout ratio: 41%.

Earnings stability factor: 12. Over the past three years, JPMorgan grew EPS 3% annually.



Best Dividend Stocks: T. Rowe Price​

The global investment manager first paid a dividend in 1986.

Dividend yield: T. Rowe Price stock provides a $4.32 annual dividend, for a 2.5% yield.

Five-year return: 133%.

Dividend growth rate: 9%.

Dividend stability factor: 16.

Dividend payout ratio: 38%.

Earnings stability factor: 4. Over the past three years, T. Rowe grew EPS 16% annually.


cant wait to own avgo when the next crash happens and the yield is 4 or 5 percent

best buy is a boom bust stock - wouldnt even look at that thing unless down by half (or more)

the others are all good picks......just need the next crash to make them affordable

just my amateur take on the group :surrender:not to be construed as investment advice from somebody that knows something
 

solarion

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Here's a variation on a historically reliable income generation options strategy, a variation on a variation of a classic really. I call this the long chicken broken wing iron condor. ...and yes it's a dumb name, but appropriate.

1616717245961.png

1616717405120.png


Because the underlying has a confirmed downward bias I've maintained the close short call portion of the chicken iron condor(with a broken call wing)...but swapped in the traditional iron condor put strategy(for more spread). The result is a higher initial credit of 84.4(after 3.89 in fees) at the risk of increased vulnerability on the long side.

I don't know if this stuff is beyond the intended scope of this thread's purpose, so let me know guys if we want to go into this stuff here. Else I'll consider starting a new thread. Condors in particular are reliable income generation options strategies as they're limited on both the up and downsides...and depending on how they're set up they can generate significant credit when constructed. This one, for instance generates 67% of the maximum loss potential at creation and needn't be held to expiration. I usually build these things in pairs, and liquidate one at 50% of max gain and the second at 75% of max gain. I'll also liquidate if there's slippage outside the short target zone...to avoid a loss.

While it's difficult to pin down exactly what kind of annualized return one can get from these things 1 - 200% without much risk isn't out of the question once you get the hang of it.
 

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That's a pretty advanced option strategy. I think the best play would be to start a separate advanced options trading thread.

I'm still trying to wrap my head around the idea. Basically, you are trying to get rid of any Delta exposure, ie a move in the stock doesn't affect the P & L. Instead, trying to isolate the time decay of the options since you are writing a Call Spread and a Put Spread at the same time.
 

solarion

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Correct. It's an attempt to target equities with temporarily elevated volatility(vega), put the clamp on in a targeted way, stack a decent premium and then defend that premium. It requires a certain amount of attention, but bottom line is, as long as the underlying stays between the wickets you keep 100% of the premium. It's as much about running out the clock(theta) as building a delta neutral position.

The pictured trade was built today in PLTR. It had a good day as some combination of the plunge protection team and ESF apparently saved the entire top heavy market from melting down. Seemingly a great time to slap the vice on what is likely a continuing downtrend. As long as it stays between the wickets set at 20 and 24 all is good and all your premiums are belong to us. Failing that you reverse the trade if it's making you nervous and hopefully walk away retaining some portion of the premium in the process.

Edit: I started a new thread to discuss investments here...

 
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MrLucky

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Thank you
 

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one of my favorite companies recently had an IPO -- Academy Sports

it does not pay a dividend

i'm building a position in it for a long term hold. they were private forever, then bought out by some wall street vipers (kkr).

numbers look good (compared to dick's) and management says they intend to continue opening new stores and in new areas

they have been the go-to sporting goods store in many cities for decades, including my hood, houston

anyone taking this ride with me? quote above is from oct when stock was 13. now at 28

remember early in this thread somebody(s) touting ford. that was a great pick -- did you make major bank on it?
 

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pfizer just declared .39 q/div. that's great news -- as there was some question about the div after the viatris spinoff

old pfe holders are now collecting .39 per share from pfe and .11 per share on vtrs shares

pfe trading at 38.x pps - giving it a 4 percent yield w/out the viatris component
 

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Is the Viatris dividend declared yet? I know they gave the guidance for a .44 cent dividend, but at this point it is just guidance and not declared, right?
 

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Is the Viatris dividend declared yet? I know they gave the guidance for a .44 cent dividend, but at this point it is just guidance and not declared, right?

right. from what i read they all but 'announced' that they were going to declare .11 in may

what if they declare .12? stock gets a little pin action? i bought a little bit more recently. the p/e is retarded at 13.x dollars per share

not sure if hold/sell if/when it gets a run in the share price
 

specsaregood

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I just got back into MAXR. https://seekingalpha.com/symbol/MAXR
I made a bundle early on in its runup and was waiting for an opportunity to put my profits back in. With the big drop today, I'm back in.
I wouldn't generally call it a "dividend stock" although it does pay a small one. But I like the company.
 

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I just got back into MAXR. https://seekingalpha.com/symbol/MAXR
I made a bundle early on in its runup and was waiting for an opportunity to put my profits back in. With the big drop today, I'm back in.
I wouldn't generally call it a "dividend stock" although it does pay a small one. But I like the company.

good timing. i had to look up the stock and chart - you stumped me on that one
 

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nibbling on OHI - rents facilities to old-folks-home operators, REIT, pays about 7%. just released their earnings report - rent collections are good, despite the covid mania associated with that business. i dont expect much in terms of stock price. buying it for the income

dividend stocks seem to have gotten a boost lately - as the communists have (so far) left dividends out of their money stealing plans re cap gains
 

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good timing. i had to look up the stock and chart - you stumped me on that one
yeah, space stuff.
I rode it from 6- 24 last year and sold it all thinking it would go down, missed the big run up to 50+. Been waiting for it to have a significant pull back.
 

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yeah, space stuff.
I rode it from 6- 24 last year and sold it all thinking it would go down, missed the big run up to 50+. Been waiting for it to have a significant pull back.

that's awesome! dont fret the run to 50 - it could have run to 10 instead

if i really like a stock i make it a habit of holding some shares long term - and some short term. i feel like i have two ways to win (mind gaming myself out of regret feels)
 

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A royalty company I've been sitting on for a couple years: KRP
Has had a good month, up about 20% this month.
It pays a variable rate but around 8%+ and most of the dividends are taxfree and will be for a couple more years.

I'm not sure I'd buy big right now, but its worth watching/looking into. I always come away from their conference calls with the impression that they really know the industry.
 

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A royalty company I've been sitting on for a couple years: KRP
Has had a good month, up about 20% this month.
It pays a variable rate but around 8%+ and most of the dividends are taxfree and will be for a couple more years.

I'm not sure I'd buy big right now, but its worth watching/looking into. I always come away from their conference calls with the impression that they really know the industry.

the fact that you listen to conference calls puts you ahead of the majority of individual investors. i like to read the transcripts of the calls

krp could be a home run - looking at their payouts, nice. read that they are in the haynesville shale - remember that field being called a megamonster when it was first being developed

 

specsaregood

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the fact that you listen to conference calls puts you ahead of the majority of individual investors. i like to read the transcripts of the calls

krp could be a home run - looking at their payouts, nice. read that they are in the haynesville shale - remember that field being called a megamonster when it was first being developed

Yeah I like reading them too; but I'll put the call on if I remember, and some companies I prefer to listen. eg: KRP, CLF. The IEP call this morning was funny as some dingaling private investor got on the call during the Q&A and started giving them investing "suggestions." The reaction at the end by the CEO was funny, Thanks for the suggestions, Operator, let's move on!
 

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This guy has a section on NON dividend investing. Says his hero Buffet does it right by growing the pie as large as possible to build as big of a position as possible with the least taxes taken out. Are we really doing this right?



1620438927937.png
 

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AT&T must have some of the worst management known to man-kind. Especially Stankey... pun intended. Cutting the dividend by 50% and I think they will do well to keep it at that level.


https://finance.yahoo.com/m/f035f8ba-39fe-3e5d-b087-ee44ba65fc80/at-t’s-dividend-payout-stands.html
 

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This guy has a section on NON dividend investing. Says his hero Buffet does it right by growing the pie as large as possible to build as big of a position as possible with the least taxes taken out. Are we really doing this right?



View attachment 209890

that's why i dont do this in taxable accts