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dividend stocks

ZZZZZ

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#41
any miners paying good dividends?
I can't get it to copy/paste cleanly, but here's a list of dividend-paying mining stocks.

https://www.dividend.com/dividend-s...data&sort_by=latest_yield&sort_direction=desc

Osisko Royalties is at 1.56%, Not too bad. I wouldn't touch most of the others.

I also hold Kirkland Lake, tiny dividend yield, but the stock has quadrupled in the last 3 years. They are harvesting two of the highest grade deposits in the world, and more great things to come from this company.

DYODD.

I'm old enough to remember back in the late '60s, most of the South African gold miners were yielding 15-20% annually! Those were the days.
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Mr Paradise

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#42
exxon hasnt made the move i spoke of. i caught MO at the bottom (vape hype). also DOW has made a sizeable move since purchase. you think i should take the profits in those?
I backed up the truck on MO when it hit $40. So much bad news is already priced in I would hold and just collect that nice divi.

DOW is one of my all time holdings but I sold my position just before the DuPont merger. I wish I would have bought into it a couple months back but didn’t have the funds. I don’t know what your entry point is but it’s had a pretty nice run up. I’d consider taking profits on it and buying back into it down the road.

XOM hasn’t made the moves I’ve been expecting either but I probably wouldn’t sell it unless it climbed back up near the mid 70’s.
 

EO 11110

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#43
I backed up the truck on MO when it hit $40. So much bad news is already priced in I would hold and just collect that nice divi.

DOW is one of my all time holdings but I sold my position just before the DuPont merger. I wish I would have bought into it a couple months back but didn’t have the funds. I don’t know what your entry point is but it’s had a pretty nice run up. I’d consider taking profits on it and buying back into it down the road.

XOM hasn’t made the moves I’ve been expecting either but I probably wouldn’t sell it unless it climbed back up near the mid 70’s.
good move on the MO. i'm in, but didnt back up the truck. it is the ultimate dividend + contrarian stock.

i think that you are right about DOW. chemical biz is so boom/bust, probably get another chance to buy it. remember monsanto doing a deal similar to what dow did. it broke up into 3 parts - drug, farm, chemical. they loaded up the chem business with debt and it ended up bk. solutia was the name of it.

that haunts me about the dow break up. the new dow is the chem portion and has a good chunk of debt too

another contrarian pick that i've been nibbling at is bayer/monsanto. the roundup drama has it hammered

1572743882112.png
 
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edsl48

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#44
While I prefer the dividend ETFs I do hold some KMB that I purchased 30 years ago and always re-invested the dividends. Now this article argues that KMB will do great because of the aging of the baby boomers and adult diapers. DYOD and as I wrote...I hold KMB
3.1% Yield


Looking for a way to hedge against the economic damage likely to be wrought by the looming 'demographic timebomb' (note: that's what economists and journalists call it)?
Here's one idea.
According to one recent study, fully one-fifth of the world's population will be of retirement age by 2070. This phenomenon is largely due to trends in the developed world: as the costs of education, housing and survival skyrocket, many are choosing to have fewer babies, delay family formation, or simply skip that whole mess altogether.


We've been over the repercussions of an aging society particularly as it relates to the economy (more job openings, slower economic growth). For better or worse, the world already has a model for how these trends might impact us, at least in the early stages. And that model is Japan, a country that already has more citizen over the age of 80 than under the age of 10.

As demographic issues create new and unforeseen challenges, Reuters reported on an easily-overlooked issue: the revolution in the consumer-products space that will need to take place in the coming years. As the population of the elderly explodes, the need for hygiene products like adults diapers will likely see a commensurate surge (and many of the companies that make these products are publicly-traded consumer staples).
The market is already growing, and last year, it expanded by 9%, to hit $9 billion.

The time may not be far off when more adults need diapers than babies as the population grows older, potentially a huge opportunity for manufacturers of incontinence products - if they can lift the stigma that has long constrained sales.
The market for adult diapers, disposable underwear and absorbent pads is growing fast, up 9% last year to $9 billion, having doubled in the last decade, according to Euromonitor.​
As more senior citizens grapple with their weak bladders, Reuters' sources said the battle for market share will likely be won and lost by the marketing department, as products that emphasize discretion and independence, as well as successfully rebranding them as essential "personal care" products, instead of "baby products."
Advertising campaigns will also need to be launched to help "normalize" the use of "diapers" by adults.
But manufacturers like market leaders Essity and Kimberly-Clark Corp reckon only half of the more than 400 million adults likely to be affected by weak bladders, are buying the right products, because they are too embarrassed.
Companies are trying various methods to change attitudes, including making products more discreet, avoiding terms like diapers or nappies, and placing items in the personal care aisle, next to deodorants and menstrual pads, rather than in the baby products section.​
Resigning adult diapers so that they can be worn more discreetly will be critical (something that some US companies are already working on), as all of those hipster grandpas try to maneuver around in their tight pants and diapers.
In the U.S., market leader Kimberly-Clark has this year given its 35-year-old Depend brand a makeover, introducing thinner, softer and more fitted products that can be worn discreetly, in an effort to make them more acceptable.
The changes are just the latest in a decade-long attempt to win over consumers, which started with manufacturers dropping the ‘diaper’ label, to loosen the association older customers might have with a loss of control in their life.
Yet it is still difficult for companies to persuade people they should buy specially made incontinence products.
"People keep the fact that they have incontinence secret from their loved ones, from their husbands, brothers and sisters – this is a deep secret for many consumers and yet it’s just a fact of life, it’s a physiological reality," said Fiona Tomlin, who leads Kimberly-Clark’s adult and feminine care division.​
Consumer products companies are also trying to "normalize" discussions on the subject via advertising. The market leader in Japan has resorted to clever catch-phrases to try and make problems like incontinence seem trivial.
In Japan, where adult incontinence products have outsold baby diaper sales since around 2013 due to a rapidly ageing population, market leader Unicharm Corp has adopted the phrase “choi more” in its advertising, which translates as "lil' dribble," to make light of the problem.
"What we are doing is trying to let people know that incontinence, even among young people, is normal," said Unicharm spokesman Hitoshi Watanabe.​
Incontinence is one of those problems that people keep secret from their friends and loved ones out of shame. But it's also surprisingly common, even in relatively young adults. Many women who have more than one child struggle with it, creating another branding opportunity.
That is, so long as packaging designers follow a golden rule: Nothing should be associated with aging.
Sweden’s Essity, the global industry leader, is also trying to reach a younger audience with its TENA brand and a new line of black, low-rise disposable underwear called Silhouette Noir.
The advert’s tagline reads: 'secret’s out: 1 in 3 women have incontinence'.
Around 12% of all women and 5% of men experience some form of urinary incontinence, although conditions vary from mild and temporary to serious and chronic, according to the Global Forum on Incontinence, which is backed by Essity.
Essity said it tries to package and market its products in a way that avoids associations with ageing.
"Designing products and packaging it as feminine and discreet as possible for females and as masculine and discreet as possible for men helps," said Ulrika Kolsrud, president of Essity’s health and medical solutions.
Getting the message across to potential customers can sometimes be a tricky path to tread. A few years ago, SCA - from which Essity was spun off in 2017 - mailed samples of its products to Swedish men above 55, only to receive a barrage of complaints.​
As the countdown continues, the demographic timebomb looks set to hit the West and Japan especially hard. But in the PROC, where a one-child policy kept births down for multiple consecutive generations, the numbers are simply staggering. It's a problem that's already starting to hit, as China's working age population shrinks for the first time - and one that could have serious repercussions for the global economy.
 

EO 11110

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#45
i'm going to add kmb to my watch/study list. thanks for the reco.

i own a couple of funds. ewu, an etf focused on the UK that pays a good yield. also some closend end funds that invest in mlp's. the fund structure allows one to avoid the ubti that makes things messy in ira's (rather than buying individual mlp's)
 

ZZZZZ

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#46
I also hold Kirkland Lake, tiny dividend yield, but the stock has quadrupled in the last 3 years. They are harvesting two of the highest grade deposits in the world, and more great things to come from this company.

.
Kirkland just increased their dividend by 50%. Still a low yield but keep an eye on this one. One of the lowest cost producers in the world, Costs still going down plus production still going up = increased dividends.

Strong YTD 2019 operating results

o Production of 694,873 ounces, 41% increase from 492,484 ounces for YTD 2018

o Operating cash cost per ounce sold of $296, 25% improvement from $397 for the same period in 2018

o AISC per ounce sold of $584, 21% better than $738 for YTD 2018.
DYODD

KIRKLAND LAKE GOLD REPORTS RECORD EARNINGS PER SHARE OF $0.84 IN THIRD QUARTER 2019, COMPANY ANNOUNCES 50% INCREASE IN COMMON DIVIDEND

https://www.stockwatch.com/News/Item?bid=Z-C:KL-2828777&symbol=KL®ion=C
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mnmom

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#47
I only invest in things I understand well enough to research myself. I did make one leap and invest in Aberdeen Australia Fund which gives me some international exposure. I personally like the oil royalty trusts in the US. I have Sandridge, Chesapeake, and Mississippian along with some iron ore trusts out of northern MN. Bought most of the oil stocks in the $1 range and they consistently give 2 to 5 cents per share every quarter depending on gas prices. Iron ore was more expensive but the returns are 20-30 cents each. Makes for 15-20% return each year in dividends.
 

Usury

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#48
I only invest in things I understand well enough to research myself. I did make one leap and invest in Aberdeen Australia Fund which gives me some international exposure. I personally like the oil royalty trusts in the US. I have Sandridge, Chesapeake, and Mississippian along with some iron ore trusts out of northern MN. Bought most of the oil stocks in the $1 range and they consistently give 2 to 5 cents per share every quarter depending on gas prices. Iron ore was more expensive but the returns are 20-30 cents each. Makes for 15-20% return each year in dividends.
My only concern about some of those oil trusts is if and when the wells run dry then not only will the dividends stop, you probably aren’t getting back your principal.
 

EO 11110

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#49
now that many brokers have gone to zero commissions the friction of getting in/out is gone. pondering some of the implications....

1. dividend capture strategies became more appealing (jumping from one dividend payer to the next, according to their div schedule)

2. diversification is truly free. instead of buying one/two stocks in an industry, one can spread bets as far and wide as he pleases for same zero cost

3. averaging into positions with as many small buys as you wish. instead of buying 100 shares at 9 a.m. -- buy 10 shares every hour.....etc

i'm sure there are more implications. if you think of any please add to the list

at mr paradise -- sold the DOW today, kept the MO. DOW was up 19 percent - so about 3 years of dividends collected in a month-ish on a trading gain
 

tigerwillow1

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#50
now that many brokers have gone to zero commissions the friction of getting in/out is gone.
There's still the bid-ask spread. There's what looks like a good article here: You’re paying too much for small stocks

A few excerpts:

There’s one kind of “fee,” however, that doesn’t show up on your brokerage statement. It’s the “spread” — the difference between the price you pay to buy a stock or exchange-traded fund and the amount you’d receive at the same time to sell it.

The bid-ask spread is the percentage that market makers charge to offset their risk.

The problem is that most investors don’t realize how much the spread costs them.

As far as jumping for dividends goes, it's in theory fruitless because dividend expectation is supposedly built into the market price. When a stock goes ex-dividend, it's market price drops by the amount of the dividend. Like I said, in theory. Perhaps reality is different.
 

ZZZZZ

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#51
There's still the bid-ask spread. There's what looks like a good article here: You’re paying too much for small stocks

A few excerpts:

There’s one kind of “fee,” however, that doesn’t show up on your brokerage statement. It’s the “spread” — the difference between the price you pay to buy a stock or exchange-traded fund and the amount you’d receive at the same time to sell it.

The bid-ask spread is the percentage that market makers charge to offset their risk.

The problem is that most investors don’t realize how much the spread costs them.
Put in your offer halfway between the bid and ask, and be patient.
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stoli

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#53
My only concern about some of those oil trusts is if and when the wells run dry then not only will the dividends stop, you probably aren’t getting back your principal.
I invested in a Canadian oil trust quite a few years ago.
The ticker was PWE. Now it trades as OBE.
Canadian tax law change, to much debt and a drop in oil price crushed
My golden goose yielding around 12%. A couple of reverse stock splits
And my principle was pennys on the dollar.
 

ZZZZZ

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#54
I invested in a Canadian oil trust quite a few years ago.
The ticker was PWE. Now it trades as OBE.
Canadian tax law change, to much debt and a drop in oil price crushed
My golden goose yielding around 12%. A couple of reverse stock splits
And my principle was pennys on the dollar.
Me too, I was in a couple of those Canuck companies. Took my lumps and bailed as soon as they changed the tax laws.
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EO 11110

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#55
There's still the bid-ask spread. There's what looks like a good article here: You’re paying too much for small stocks

As far as jumping for dividends goes, it's in theory fruitless because dividend expectation is supposedly built into the market price. When a stock goes ex-dividend, it's market price drops by the amount of the dividend. Like I said, in theory. Perhaps reality is different.
i'm not playing the div capture game. i read some study saying that within 3 weeks of the distribution that the stock recovers most of it back.

i'm imagine nyc puters are watching and closing any gaps like that
 

mnmom

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#57
My only concern about some of those oil trusts is if and when the wells run dry then not only will the dividends stop, you probably aren’t getting back your principal.
Absolutely you won't get your principal back. The whole point of the trust is to maximize the profit of the holding. They pump the wells dry. However, if you know a thing or two about geology and oil (I was a geologist) you can read up on the projected pull from the wells owned and pay attention to whats been done so far. Sell 65-70% of the way through the life of the well and you'll recoup somewhere around 70-80% of your principal. Most wells in TX and the southern us that will be 12-15 years into the trust.
 

edsl48

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#58
I invested in a Canadian oil trust quite a few years ago.
The ticker was PWE. Now it trades as OBE.
Canadian tax law change, to much debt and a drop in oil price crushed
My golden goose yielding around 12%. A couple of reverse stock splits
And my principle was pennys on the dollar.
I did too, The "Canadian Oil Sands Trust" that the Canadian Government outlawed making it into a regular taxable Corporation and after that I bailed. One wouldn't think the Canadians would do that, or at least I didn't, but they did. Was a great run while it lasted though and I thonk Suncor ended up with the properties.
 

Uglytruth

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#59
Sooooooooooo is it Berkshire B funds or S&P 500 to capture all the billions being pumped into the markets that never seem to go down

With all the control they have and digits meaning nothing they are in total control of everything, always and forever.
That includes your life, your assets, your sanity.
 

Mr Paradise

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#60
With all the control they have and digits meaning nothing they are in total control of everything, always and forever.
That includes your life, your assets, your sanity.
And yet somehow we enjoy more personal freedoms than probably any other humans at any other time in recorded history.
 

Uglytruth

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#61
And yet somehow we enjoy more personal freedoms than probably any other humans at any other time in recorded history.
Try fishing without a license?
Try building or putting an addition on without permits?
Try traveling without your papers?
Try getting paid in other than .gov approved fiat?
Try not paying taxes?
Etc.................
 

DodgebyDave

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#62
Try fishing without a license?
Try building or putting an addition on without permits?
Try traveling without your papers?
Try getting paid in other than .gov approved fiat?
Try not paying taxes?
Etc.................
Try "Breaking The Law". It's fun!

I've said it before and I will say ithat again. 600 a year is a small price to pay for the entertainment AND 24/7/365 Mexican removal and storage.

Ever had a drunken mexican passed out on your yard? I poked it with a stick and gave him a chance to get up and walk away.

Then

I dialed a magic number and a circus came to collect up the escaped chimpanzee.

It was a sight!

Saved me from having to shoot his ass and then roll him out into the street.

Also, the public library.

The government day care keeps the spawn busy for a while.

Granted, some of y'all are getting fucked on taxes. Not my fault or problem.

Do something. Don't bitch. DO!
 

Mr Paradise

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#63
Try fishing without a license?
Try building or putting an addition on without permits?
Try traveling without your papers?
Try getting paid in other than .gov approved fiat?
Try not paying taxes?
Etc.................

When you share a planet with 8 billion people there has to be laws. Buying a fishing license and having to have a passport still doesn’t change the fact you have more personal freedoms and a higher quality of life than at any other time in history.
Do you have a better alternative? Should everyone just be allowed to do whatever they want? That’ll go over real well in cities with millions of people.
 

stoli

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#65
8 billion people. Who cares. I live locally and could care less about the rest of the planet
I feed myself without permission from anybody via a rod and reel and a local watershed.
 

edsl48

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#66
I can no longer put in a window without a building permit that insures there will be an inspector, some patronage employee, that can not match my qualifications come into my home and have a look around. That is how bad things have become.
 

<SLV>

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#67
I have always leaned toward growth stock mutual funds, but this market has me on the sidelines. I am intrigued by value plays, and searching for good candidates is new to me. So, you who are more experienced, please critique this list:

1573486458744.png
 

<SLV>

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#68
Here are a couple more on my radar:

1573486717596.png
 

EO 11110

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#69
slv - i like all of them except ubs. watching lehman, bear stearns, merrill lynch, countrywide, others suddenly go bankrupt turned me against that whole sector. the extreme book cooking hidden in the back rooms is a risk i'm not prepared to buy into

my two faves on your list are t, abbv because they are the least risky imo. that energy company is interesting. i'm going to do a deeper dive on it.
 

stoli

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#70
SLV

I copied this from seeking alpha.

Pattern Energy is being purchased at $26.75/share.

Shares are trading at a slight premium to present value.

Shareholders should consider the possibility of a higher offer and the tax implications of selling shares.

Similar companies which may be potential replacement investments include Atlantica Yield, Clearway Energy, NextEra Energy Partners, and TerraForm Power.

Just as Pattern Energy (PEGI) began making progress on delivering significant CAFD growth, it decided to sell out to the Canadian Pension Plan Investment Board. Shareholders are mostly disappointed at the offer of $26.75/share to take the company private. While the offer represents a “premium” to the price before buyout rumors began, it was below the share price at the time of announcement. Pattern’s peers in the yieldco space have appreciated similarly in the last few months. As it stands, the current offer represents fair value for the company without taking into account the significant growth from recent acquisitions and upside from the development business.
 

<SLV>

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#71
slv - i like all of them except ubs. watching lehman, bear stearns, merrill lynch, countrywide, others suddenly go bankrupt turned me against that whole sector. the extreme book cooking hidden in the back rooms is a risk i'm not prepared to buy into

my two faves on your list are t, abbv because they are the least risky imo. that energy company is interesting. i'm going to do a deeper dive on it.
T and ABBV make me nervous because they are riding 16-18% above their 200 day moving average. Seems like they might be priced into the current bubble. (BBL on the other hand is about 4% below its 200 day moving average -- but it is a depository certificate rather than common stock.) Maybe T and ABBV will be good ones to have on the shopping list after the bubble bursts.

I agree that owning finance stocks right now seems like a bad idea.

Is VIV too good to be true? Are they borrowing to pay dividends? Is Brazil too risky right now?
 

EO 11110

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#72
agree on waiting for a dip to buy. t is up double digits since i started this thread.

VIV is a wild card, but in the right sector. historically telecoms are one of the main ways to play less stable countries. if the country does well, the telecoms do well. and they provide more stability during the crashes

BBL is a megacorp. i wouldnt sweat the ADS issue. i'm going to take a hard look at that one too.
 

Mr Paradise

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#74
8 billion people. Who cares. I live locally and could care less about the rest of the planet
I feed myself without permission from anybody via a rod and reel and a local watershed.
Congratulations to the guy who lives in a van down by the river and walks to the library everyday to use the internet. For the rest of us on this rock that’s not really practical.