• Same story, different day...........year ie more of the same fiat floods the world
  • There are no markets
  • "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"

Farm Tractor thread

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Mgr
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,124
Likes
2,780
Location
Lone Star State
#1
Anyone have any favorites or pics of ones they own or have owned ? I did a search and found a thread on a tractor show but wanted to cover the real workhorses. Old versus new ? Favorite models and/or year(s) ? Engine types, PTO's, etc.......

I think a few members here had (or have) Ford 8N models. I also found an outstanding Allis-Chalmers WD in my area for sale. Post any information on these (but no garden variety stuff please).

~AD~
 

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Mgr
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,124
Likes
2,780
Location
Lone Star State
#2
Here's the Allis-Chalmers WD >>

00u0u_aMJ1en1tbqq_600x450.jpg
 
Last edited:

northfarmer

Seeker
Seeker
Joined
Feb 12, 2011
Messages
331
Likes
137
#3
John deere 4440,no farmer ever,ever,ever said "jeez i wish i had a smaller tractor" or "i wish i didn't have a cab without heat or air conditioning".

Pto trade out from 540 to 1000 about 2 minutes.

Best parts inventory to boot.
 

hoarder

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
10,275
Likes
9,405
Location
Montana
#4
I miss my old 8N. I left her in Texas.
 

Attachments

hoarder

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
10,275
Likes
9,405
Location
Montana
#5
IIRC, Ford sold so many tractors in the 40's because the competition didn't have hydraulic 3 point hitches with PTO until later. Most of those old tractors are still running....all over the world.
 

hoarder

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
10,275
Likes
9,405
Location
Montana
#6
Here's an older Kubota I had. it was about a 1980 model.I didn't really like it. It was narrow and top heavy. The bucket didn't curl much more than in the picture so when you travel with a load half the material sprinkles along the road, especially going downhill. The 4WD is light duty and the engines are throw-away.
 

Attachments

hoarder

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
10,275
Likes
9,405
Location
Montana
#7
I don't own a tractor right now, but the next one I buy will be a Case or John Deere "Skip Loader". Most are about 40 HP. These are built a whole lot stronger than AG tractors. The front axle has planetaries and the frame is real heavy so you can use the bucket for digging instead of just moving loose material. These can be had at auctions much cheaper than comparable ag tractors.
The only disadvantages I know of is that PTO was optional and the 3 point hitch is category II instead of the more common category I.
 

Attachments

Joined
Jul 5, 2011
Messages
153
Likes
94
Location
se co
#9
For little homestead tractors I like the JD 4020 w bucket, running on propane, and the ford 600 series for fieldwork. Nice little all purpose tractors (to 80 acres).

Real large scale fieldwork is another matter entirely.
 
Last edited:

hoarder

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
10,275
Likes
9,405
Location
Montana
#11
My old Massey 35 with the Hi-Lo PTO. She has turfees on 'er but she still gets around...Not like my Belarus 310 or case 480 4x4's, but I have a soft spot for her...
Tell us about your Case 480. I assume it has a hydrostatic transmission with shuttle. Have you used other implements besides the Gannon box blade? Does it have a ripper?
 

RUSH2112

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Jan 6, 2012
Messages
1,014
Likes
285
#12
My father was a collector of Massey Harris tractors.

The Pony pictured below was considered the Holy Grail and he eventually found one.

Upon settling his estate, I was given a Minneapolis Moline, not quite as nice as the one in the pic.

We also had a Cockshutt 30 we used for everday farmwork.

Use to like the fact you could just grab the crank, set the choke and in a couple cranks he had a running tractor.

MH-pony.jpg

MM.jpg
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
154,413
Likes
40,848
#13
Never owned a tractor but I do go to shows once in a while. Here's a vid you might enjoy:

[video=youtube_share;aJy8vXGsoAY]http://youtu.be/aJy8vXGsoAY[/video]
 

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Mgr
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,124
Likes
2,780
Location
Lone Star State
#14
Some entertainment.........

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Mgr
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,124
Likes
2,780
Location
Lone Star State
#15
Thought this was pretty amazing for a 60+ year old tractor that is *stock*.........I've seen lifted 4x4 trucks not being able to do this.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Lt Dan

Gold Pirate
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 1, 2010
Messages
3,665
Likes
5,701
Location
VA Psych Ward
#16
Mine is a Ford 1710 something like in this little youtube clip. The bucket on mine is a bit smaller, more the size for working heavier stuff like dirt. My old tractor was a Ford 640 with a bucket loader, worthless in snow, front was too heavy and no 4x4 or chains.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Mgr
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,124
Likes
2,780
Location
Lone Star State
#17
Here's something more useful, a cordwood saw on a Ferguson:

 
Last edited by a moderator:

ttazzman

Midas Member
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Apr 2, 2010
Messages
4,858
Likes
4,314
Location
mid-usa
#18
John deere 4440,no farmer ever,ever,ever said "jeez i wish i had a smaller tractor" or "i wish i didn't have a cab without heat or air conditioning".

Pto trade out from 540 to 1000 about 2 minutes.

Best parts inventory to boot.
one of the finest tractors ever built...(i would like to find one with MFWD).....for real work its hard to beat the 70-80s john deeres....those 4440s are still bringing new prices around here, only thing i didnt like about them was pulling the hood off..

for misc work......i really like my little JD 4500/mfwd/fel for a compact it does a ton of things and is quite nimble.....
 
Last edited:

Lt Dan

Gold Pirate
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 1, 2010
Messages
3,665
Likes
5,701
Location
VA Psych Ward
#19
Here's something more useful, a cordwood saw on a Ferguson:

Dragon, back before we had a 3-point hitch tractor, my dad had an old Alice Chalmers tractor that he actually made his own cord wood saw to use on it. My brother and I probably cut more wood with that saw than my dad, (who had passed away) could ever have imagined. After I left the farm and went in the Navy, my brother still used the saw. He sold it eventually or something, but bought one that would work with 3-point hitch and PTO instead of the belt. He still uses it - he's in his 70's. I never thought hand splitting rails out of logs was all that great of an idea. You have to split logs to use one of those cord wood saws unless you want to cut and turn. So, I just use a chainsaw and cut to length. Then, if the log is too big to go in the furnace I use a power log splitter to bust 'em down to size.

thanks for the thread, BTW! :cool1:
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Barrettone

Seeker
Seeker
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
163
Likes
162
Location
Michigan
#20
Tell us about your Case 480. I assume it has a hydrostatic transmission with shuttle. Have you used other implements besides the Gannon box blade? Does it have a ripper?
I have seen a hoe attachment on the 480's before, but other than that, just the gannon box. The ripper teeth on the box coupled with the down pressure really tears stuff up. I have the enclosed cab and heater on mine. It is just 2wd, but it goes just about anywhere I need it to (those pics are just file photos...my 480 is actually orange with the white cab...a little older). The power steering sure is nice too. I have not seen a dedicated ripper for this unit, but I imagine one could be made. I made a set of 6' long custom bucket forks for mine, and added wheel weights to the rear so I can move things around. She has lots of power. I got the tractor for free when scrapping out a factory that had it parked out in their bone yard. They had eithered it too much and two cylinders got fried. It also needed front tires. My buddy bought an "in frame kit" for $500 and re-sleeved it and put new pistons, rods and rings in it from that kit as a favor. Had to get new bucket pins too. Got the other stuff from the scrap yard. All told I only had a $1000 into it, and she runs like she's new. Has all new tires on it too as they must've put new rears on it just before they parked it at the factory. Got lucky on that one.
 

JustPassinThru

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
Messages
2,736
Likes
1,535
Location
a better place
#21
IIRC, Ford sold so many tractors in the 40's because the competition didn't have hydraulic 3 point hitches with PTO until later. Most of those old tractors are still running....all over the world.
The Ford 8N seems to be virtually indestructible. About 1980, I was working on a golf course...their motor pool had two 8Ns, a 1949 and 1952. Both were full workers; a little worn but pulling their weight. They survived the bolt-butcher mechanics we had...and 8Ns continue today.

As easy to fix as a Model A; made for primitive environments. If I were laying out a SHTF hidey-hole...with acreage...I'd want one around, on the off-chance some gasoline survives or a primitive refinery comes on line.
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
154,413
Likes
40,848
#22
Last edited:

rockriver

Seeker
Seeker
Joined
May 2, 2013
Messages
356
Likes
220
#23
a few comments on a couple of models.
i spent a little time on these for friends.
if i'm off track on what is desired in this thread, holler and i'll delete.
but, i figure a good tractor is worth the gold it would take to buy it.. especially now!!
if we have a crisis, i'd rather have the tractor than the pm!

john deere brought in some german built tractors..
the specific one i rode a little i believe was a 1980 4240 (hp listed at 50) if i'm off on the model.
awesome power and ability.. friend sold it for 5900 recently and already regretting it. i would sure recommend it.

john deere 990 40 hp about a 2004 very fuel efficient. can handle a 6' mower easily. yanmar engine from japan. 2 row plow. get the mfwd if you can. friend only had the 2wheel drive.. when he used loader, he needed the 4wd... shoot, this comment would apply to any tractor.

john deere 770 and kubota L2?? both of these are basic low 20 hp. the john deere is yanmar.
year models about mid 1980's very dependable.. can break ground.. can run 6' mowers
if they are "narrow" better suited for 5' mower. can operate tiller well. stingy on fuel.

kubota 5640 50 hp 2010 no frills but heavy.. all a homesteader would ever need.

on all models...
make sure it's got power steering. (you can get by without on the 20 hp)
get 4wd if you can.. really increases capability..
look for hyd fittings on rear and sides... increases capabilities for adding equipment.

getcha one!
 

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Mgr
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,124
Likes
2,780
Location
Lone Star State
#24
On mowers, is the Ford 8N best suited for a 5-ft. mower ? Would it be able to handle a 6ft or even a 7ft ?

My reason for asking is that I might end up buying the tractor separate from the bush hog (all being used equipment). Depending on pricing and what I can find I might run across a good deal on a 6ft. I tend to think bigger is better but this might hurt me in the long run.

Any input is appreciated. :thumbs_up:
 

rockriver

Seeker
Seeker
Joined
May 2, 2013
Messages
356
Likes
220
#25
if i were buying a used tractor, i'd try to get all the equipment that the guy had that went with the tractor. buying the package, you'll get the exta equipment for a small incremental price..
--
he may just have an old rusty plow or cultivator out in the edge of the woods.. the rust won't hurt them!!
buying implements gets expensive buying them by the piece,
congrats on what you are doing... i just saw the property thread!!
i started to say "better than gold" but i don't want to get kicked off the forum!! lol.
 

hoarder

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
10,275
Likes
9,405
Location
Montana
#26
On mowers, is the Ford 8N best suited for a 5-ft. mower ? Would it be able to handle a 6ft or even a 7ft ?

My reason for asking is that I might end up buying the tractor separate from the bush hog (all being used equipment). Depending on pricing and what I can find I might run across a good deal on a 6ft. I tend to think bigger is better but this might hurt me in the long run.

Any input is appreciated. :thumbs_up:
A 5' Bushhog type flail mower is just right. Any larger and you won't have enough power. Due to gearing limitations, you don't have the option to go any slower than 1st gear, full RPM. I mowed down plenty of 20' tall 2" diameter hardwood trees with mine. Sometimes you have to make two passes.
 

carpenter

New Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
39
Likes
19
Location
The Stand Your Ground State
#27
The Ford 8N seems to be virtually indestructible. About 1980, I was working on a golf course...their motor pool had two 8Ns, a 1949 and 1952. Both were full workers; a little worn but pulling their weight. They survived the bolt-butcher mechanics we had...and 8Ns continue today.

As easy to fix as a Model A; made for primitive environments. If I were laying out a SHTF hidey-hole...with acreage...I'd want one around, on the off-chance some gasoline survives or a primitive refinery comes on line.
In the event of TEOTWAWKI one could always cobble together a gassifier out of common hardware.
http://dropbox.curry.com/ShowNotesA...06-23/Assets/Agenda 21/emergency_gassifer.pdf



I own a Massey Ferguson 65 diesel, and a Ford 601 Workmaster gas.

Both are ugly, but working all the way.
 

hoarder

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
10,275
Likes
9,405
Location
Montana
#28

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Mgr
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,124
Likes
2,780
Location
Lone Star State
#29
Thanks for the links, Hoarder. Up until now I've been using this site for reference >> http://www.tractordata.com/

Any advice on plowing implements for a Ford 8N. I plan on tilling some soil for a large garden.
 

hoarder

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
10,275
Likes
9,405
Location
Montana
#30
Thanks for the links, Hoarder. Up until now I've been using this site for reference >> http://www.tractordata.com/

Any advice on plowing implements for a Ford 8N. I plan on tilling some soil for a large garden.
For anything less than 3 or 4 acres, a single bottom plow is all you need. A two bottom plow will require that the tires are loaded.
Rockriver's advice about getting the implements with the tractor is good. Not only are they much cheaper that way, but it's damn hard to get anyone to part with theirs unless daddy dies and the kids sell, in which case they often haul the implements to the scrapyard, which is a good place to look.
Fords usually used the Dearborn plows.
In addition to the plow, you'll want a disc. There are a lot of old discs around that don't fit a 3 point hitch. Most of the other makes of tractors back then were tow behind implements. No problem . Tow it behind the 8N. If you find an old tiller, many are homemade, that would be handy to flatten things out better.

I'm not a real farmer. I learned by doing and reading the net. An "internet hobby farmer" go ahead and laugh. All I ever grew besides a small garden was food plots for wildlife.
 

Eat Beef

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
2,736
Likes
1,768
Location
Third Coast
#31
I can't believe no one has mentioned the Ford 3000. Not as ubiquitous as the 8/9N, but more powerful, and diesel. Super reliable and sips fuel. I used to put in 12-15 hour days drilling post holes and couldn't fit a 5 gal bucket of diesel in at the end of the day.

All the older Fords and Masseys are good tractors. I'm not super familiar with the smaller JD, Case, and IH tractors, but most seemed to be good enough. I'd stay away from the newer tractors, too many emissions and computer stuff to foul up. I wouldn't buy a 'hydrostatic' on a bet.

Likewise the off brands, try finding parts for a made in Lithuania tractor now, much less after a significant social upheaval. One exception being the first Mahindra, which was a licensed copy of the IH 64.
 

hoarder

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
10,275
Likes
9,405
Location
Montana
#32
I can't believe no one has mentioned the Ford 3000. Not as ubiquitous as the 8/9N, but more powerful, and diesel. Super reliable and sips fuel. I used to put in 12-15 hour days drilling post holes and couldn't fit a 5 gal bucket of diesel in at the end of the day.

....... I wouldn't buy a 'hydrostatic' on a bet.
Did yours have that SelectOspeed transmission? Are they any better than hydrostatic?
 

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Mgr
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,124
Likes
2,780
Location
Lone Star State
#33
I can't believe no one has mentioned the Ford 3000. Not as ubiquitous as the 8/9N, but more powerful, and diesel. Super reliable and sips fuel. I used to put in 12-15 hour days drilling post holes and couldn't fit a 5 gal bucket of diesel in at the end of the day.
Wow, checked the stats on that beast and the drawbar pull is 5,000+ which is nearly double that of the old 8N's. Also, I think most have power steering which as mentioned before by Hoarder is a must for a front loader. Perhaps I need one of each. :D

Here's one for sale locally for $3250......and he'll take $400 additional for the 6ft. Howse rotary mower.
00b0b_60GsrKsT7q8_600x450.jpg

FWIW ~ I'm thinking of eventually owning 2 tractors so I have backup and perhaps with specific implements already attached. Of course, this won't happen right away but over time (and as funds allow). As for now I'm in research mode and this thread has been fantastic. :thumbs_up:
 

JustPassinThru

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
Messages
2,736
Likes
1,535
Location
a better place
#34
I can't believe no one has mentioned the Ford 3000. Not as ubiquitous as the 8/9N, but more powerful, and diesel. Super reliable and sips fuel. I used to put in 12-15 hour days drilling post holes and couldn't fit a 5 gal bucket of diesel in at the end of the day.
I don't know the diesel model; but our golf course had several of the 1960s three-cylinder OHV gas Fords.

They didn't compare to the 8N. On paper they had higher horsepower; but much lower torque. They wanted to rev; I don't know who the braniac was who made such a tractor engine, but they did.

Is the diesel version based on that gas engine? Or did they buy a good four from a reliable diesel manufacturer?

Power steering was on the newer ones...the same crappy Ford linkage-type power steering they used on their cars. Problematic.
 

hoarder

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
10,275
Likes
9,405
Location
Montana
#35
Lot's of people get two tractors. One will have a front end loader. There always heavy stuff around a farm and they sure save the back and are worth it even if you seldom move dirt. If you have much steep terrain, 4WD is needed not so much just for traction but for safety. You can get up any hill with a running start on a 2WD tractor, but 4WD means 4WD braking (and slower speeds), which is better than anti-lock brakes. Working a loader with a 4WD tractor is much easier. So a tractor with a loader and 4WD and power steering is valuable....and usually expensive. Again, most 4WD tractors are later models and Japanese. The front axles tend to be weak.
If you don't have steep terrain, a loader and power steering would do.
 

JustPassinThru

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
Messages
2,736
Likes
1,535
Location
a better place
#36
Lot's of people get two tractors. One will have a front end loader. There always heavy stuff around a farm and they sure save the back and are worth it even if you seldom move dirt. If you have much steep terrain, 4WD is needed not so much just for traction but for safety. You can get up any hill with a running start on a 2WD tractor, but 4WD means 4WD braking (and slower speeds), which is better than anti-lock brakes. Working a loader with a 4WD tractor is much easier. So a tractor with a loader and 4WD and power steering is valuable....and usually expensive. Again, most 4WD tractors are later models and Japanese. The front axles tend to be weak.
If you don't have steep terrain, a loader and power steering would do.
Better off with two or more old tractors, than one new and expensive one.

First, there's the lack of loan-servicing. Then, if one quits, there's another one standing at the ready. If you can get the same or similar models, you have parts ready...you can actually replace the part at your leisure, not in the middle of a job.
 

hoarder

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
10,275
Likes
9,405
Location
Montana
#37
Better off with two or more old tractors, than one new and expensive one.

First, there's the lack of loan-servicing. Then, if one quits, there's another one standing at the ready. If you can get the same or similar models, you have parts ready...you can actually replace the part at your leisure, not in the middle of a job.
I agree, but older 4WD tractors are scarce as hens teeth. I've known two people in my life who died in tractor flipovers. There is a lot of safety in the slow crawl of a 4WD.
 

JustPassinThru

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
Messages
2,736
Likes
1,535
Location
a better place
#38
I agree, but older 4WD tractors are scarce as hens teeth. I've known two people in my life who died in tractor flipovers. There is a lot of safety in the slow crawl of a 4WD.
Well...it depends on what you're doing with it.

The three-point hitch is a great boon to safety. You can add to that by using a long rigid drawbar off the axle when pulling a wagon.

The roll bar was common, maybe standard, from the 1970s. Surely a metal-fabbing shop could put one on an older tractor.

There ARE times when you need 4WD. I used to wish we had it on that golf course in rainy spring weather. But in the end it all comes down to what you're doing with it, under what conditions and what soil.

4WD adds tremendous complexity to a tractor; and with it, maintenance and failure costs.
 

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Mgr
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,124
Likes
2,780
Location
Lone Star State
#39
Lot's of people get two tractors. One will have a front end loader. There always heavy stuff around a farm and they sure save the back and are worth it even if you seldom move dirt.
Exactly what I was thinking. Plus, a tractor with a loader seems a bit difficult to see around. As for steep, my property is on a gentle hill so I don't think 4WD would be necessary.............nice, yes, but not required.
 

hoarder

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
10,275
Likes
9,405
Location
Montana
#40
Well...it depends on what you're doing with it.

The three-point hitch is a great boon to safety. You can add to that by using a long rigid drawbar off the axle when pulling a wagon.

The roll bar was common, maybe standard, from the 1970s. Surely a metal-fabbing shop could put one on an older tractor.

There ARE times when you need 4WD. I used to wish we had it on that golf course in rainy spring weather. But in the end it all comes down to what you're doing with it, under what conditions and what soil.

4WD adds tremendous complexity to a tractor; and with it, maintenance and failure costs.
Anyone who's gone down a few steep or ice covered hills with a 2WD tractor and thought about "what if" can appreciate the idea of 4 wheels braking at the same time. ROPS is useful in a rollover, but unless you're wearing a safety belt, you can still easily get killed.