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Gold / Copper and Silver / Copper Alloys? Make a Real Regional Currency?

MIavatar

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#1
Just had a thought. You wanto here about well here it go.

People have been bitching about solutions. So after the hyper inflationary collapse. Well, how about local or regional coinage based on high copper content with either silver or gold transmuted in. wouldent this always have intrinsic value as a more valuable base metal? I don't know anything about the "goldbacks" or other localized currency.
Don't know anything about copper/silver/gold alloys either so this is all top google. Just had the idea of "watering down" the more precious metals with copper to create a real dollar coin. That would also have industrial uses.


https://www.thesscogroup.com/products/industrial-products/silver-copper-alloys/

Silver has the highest electrical conductivity and the highest thermal conductivity of any metal. In this respect it is the best contact material available. It is, however, rarely recommended for use in light-duty applications because of its tendency to tarnish.

The voltage at heavier duties is normally sufficient to break down these sulphide films so that their presence does not affect contact performance.

The addition of copper to Fine Silver has the beneficial effect of increasing hardness and arc-resistance. These alloys have better anti-welding properties for applications up to 100A, but are not as good as Silver-Nickel on “make”. At the same time, however, contact resistance increases as does tarnishing.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tumbaga
Tumbaga is an alloy composed mostly of gold and copper. It has a significantly lower melting point than gold or copper alone. It is harder than copper, but maintains malleability after being pounded.

Tumbaga can be treated with a simple acid, like citric acid, to dissolve copper off the surface. What remains is a shiny layer of nearly pure gold on top of a harder, more durable copper-gold alloy sheet. This process is referred to as depletion gilding.
Use and function

Tumbaga was widely used by the pre-Columbian cultures of South and Central America to make religious objects. Like most gold alloys, tumbaga was versatile and could be cast, drawn, hammered, gilded, soldered, welded, plated, hardened, annealed, polished, engraved, embossed, and inlaid.

The proportion of gold to copper in artifacts varies widely; items have been found with as much as 97% gold while others instead contain 97% copper. Some tumbaga has also been found to be composed of metals besides gold and copper, up to 18% of the total mass of the tumbaga.

Tumbaga objects were often made using a combination of the lost wax technique and depletion gilding. An alloy of varying proportions of copper, silver, and gold (typically in a percentage ratio of 80:15:5) was cast. After removal it was burned, turning surface copper into copper oxide, which was then mechanically removed[clarification needed] The object was then placed in an oxidizing solution likely composed of sodium chloride (salt) and ferric sulfate. This dissolved the silver from the surface, leaving only gold. When viewed through a microscope, voids appear where the copper and silver had been.
 

Ragnarok

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#2
“Watering down” precious metals with base metals is how the world got to where it is now.

How would such coins reliably be tested for authenticity and metal content?

The goldback solves many problems and states are prohibited from issuing coinage.

R.
 

MIavatar

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#3
“Watering down” precious metals with base metals is how the world got to where it is now.

How would such coins reliably be tested for authenticity and metal content?

The goldback solves many problems and states are prohibited from issuing coinage.

R.
Guess it would be watering up.

As for authenticity, just a thought. Each region has a "Forge". Each Forge becomes the defacto bank and protectorate of the region taking in all the metal holders metal and smelting it on the spot for a voted on percentage fee. Metal holders then get the submitted metals as alloyed coins with a regional guarantee of value voted on by law. The Forge then becomes the "Castle" of the land and defacto governing district. I guess this would require that there be metal holders at all lol. It's basically a revert back to feudalism.
 

Ragnarok

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#4
Guess it would be watering up.

As for authenticity, just a thought. Each region has a "Forge". Each Forge becomes the defacto bank and protectorate of the region taking in all the metal holders metal and smelting it on the spot for a voted on percentage fee. Metal holders then get the submitted metals as alloyed coins with a regional guarantee of value voted on by law. The Forge then becomes the "Castle" of the land and defacto governing district. I guess this would require that there be metal holders at all lol. It's basically a revert back to feudalism.
Assigning a fixed currency value to precious metals never works for very long. Even today, mints worldwide stamp out coins of gold or silver with face values far below their actual metal value, which means they will never circulate. Far better to mint coims of a given weight and purity, and let the daily metal value against goods and currencies determine their value in trade.

2c,
R.
 

FunnyMoney

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#5
Beyond the obvious problems, some already mentioned above, and please forgive me from any rain on the parade, but any solution needs to take into account the past proven laws of economics.

In this particular case, as with all "honest money and competing money circulation" economic situations, Gresham's Law must be accounted for.
You did not account for the ramifications of that law; without doing that, the solution can not work - or at least not for any significant length of time.