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Impact Of China Restricting Rare Earth Sales To US?

searcher

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#1
Expert on impact of China restricting rare earths sales to US
CNA


Published on May 29, 2019
David Merriman, a rare earth expert and Manager of Battery & Electric Vehicle Materials at Roskill Consultancy, spoke about the impact if China restricts rare earths sales to the US.

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#2
No access to rare earth minerals could be 'serious problem for US's high tech production', says expe
CNBC Television


Published on May 29, 2019
Beijing is considering cutting off the U.S.'s access to rare earth minerals. James Pethokoukis, AEI, and Joel Trachtman, Tufts' Fletcher School, join 'The Exchange' to discuss how serious the threat may be.
 

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#3
China Threatens Cuts To Rare Earth Metals In Trade Dispute! How Will Precious Metals React?
SalivateMetal


Published on May 29, 2019
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brosil

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#4
Let's see, a lot of China's rare earth is mined in the U.S. Second, which rare earths? Some have no real use. Lastly, There are closed mines and plenty of scrap electronics here. We could probably recycle quite a bit. A postscript, What do we make here anymore that uses them?
 

gliddenralston

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#5
How's the 4d chess master doing?
 

ZZZZZ

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#6
I have been studying the rare earths industry for 10+years. I made a ton of money on rare earth stocks. (Gave back half a ton when the stocks subsequently crashed. :D)

If, and of course it is a HUGE if, China locks out the US, the biggest immediate impact will be on the Deep State and the Military Industrial Complex. Rare earths are essential to just about every high-tech weapons and defense electronic systems we have.

Tesla and the rest of the electric vehicle industry will be next. Ya can't make an EV without high-tech magnets.

The US, Canada, and Australia have significant resources of rare earths, but as of right now there is only one large-scale producer outside of China, in Australia (Lynas), and they are in deep trouble and may have to cut back due to problems with their refinery in Malaysia.

Mining and refining rare earths is a very complex and expensive process. It's not like gold or lead or whatever where you just scoop up the ore,, leech it, run it through a mill, etc. It takes many years, not months, to bring a new rare earth refinery online..

The old Molycorp mine in California is now controlled by Chinese interests,, and they send most of the output to China. And the mine produces mostly "light" rare earth elements, which are not very critical and not that significant to US high tech industry. The "heavy" and much rarer rare earths are the critical ones.

As I said in another thread,, keep an eye on the very few US rare earth exploration companies: UCore (UCU.V) and Rare Element Resources (REEMF). The latter is up 6-fold in the last two weeks. I own both stocks. JMHO DYODD.
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Goldhedge

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#8
So China cuts REs from export and their manufacturing dies on the vine...

The US is the biggest market. Who is China going to manufacture high tech stuff and sell to?

I don't see it happening myself.
 

ZZZZZ

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#9
So China cuts REs from export and their manufacturing dies on the vine...

The US is the biggest market. Who is China going to manufacture high tech stuff and sell to?

I don't see it happening myself.
China's internal domestic market is huge and growing, as is the rest of Asia such as Viet Nam, Cambodia, Thailand.

And there's Africa.

I posted this over here: https://www.goldismoney2.com/thread...ion-to-sell-us-treasurys.269744/#post-1647636

Africa will replace the US as China's main export market. Africa needs so much more stuff to get its people the 20th century, let alone the 21st. Everything from shoes and socks to smart phones..

Africa is very lightly regulated. Just bribe a few corrupt politicians and you can import or export just about anything.
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GOLDBRIX

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#11
Let's see, a lot of China's rare earth is mined in the U.S. Second, which rare earths? Some have no real use. Lastly, There are closed mines and plenty of scrap electronics here. We could probably recycle quite a bit. A postscript, What do we make here anymore that uses them?
EXACTLY, Nevada is chock full of rare earth metals. It is more expensive to mine so US industries bought the cheap slave labor versions created by the Chinese gov.
 

ZZZZZ

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#12
EXACTLY, Nevada is chock full of rare earth metals. It is more expensive to mine so US industries bought the cheap slave labor versions created by the Chinese gov.
Maybe chock full, but it takes a good 8-10 years to bring a new REE mine and more importantly the refinery online.

The REE deposit owned by Rare Element Resources (REEMF) is located in Wyoming, just down the road from Devil's Tower. (Close Encounters anyone? :D) It is probably the deposit closest to being developed into a producing mine in the US, but it is still at least 3 years down the road, maybe 2 if Trump passes an emergency order and cuts all the red tape and regulations.

JMHO DYODD
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Zed

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#13
No access to rare earth minerals could be 'serious problem for US's high tech production', says expert
Military tech?! You must have a stock pile.
 

ZZZZZ

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#14
Military tech?! You must have a stock pile.
Good question. But the US DoD doesn't talk publicly about such matters.

Every year for the last ten or so, the president goes through the motions of pretending to be concerned, but not much ever happens.

They've had their chances.

Presidential Executive Order on a Federal Strategy to Ensure Secure and Reliable Supplies of Critical Minerals
ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT

Issued on: December 20, 2017
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By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Findings. The United States is heavily reliant on imports of certain mineral commodities that are vital to the Nation’s security and economic prosperity. This dependency of the United States on foreign sources creates a strategic vulnerability for both its economy and military to adverse foreign government action, natural disaster, and other events that can disrupt supply of these key minerals. Despite the presence of significant deposits of some of these minerals across the United States, our miners and producers are currently limited by a lack of comprehensive, machine-readable data concerning topographical, geological, and geophysical surveys; permitting delays; and the potential for protracted litigation regarding permits that are issued. An increase in private‑sector domestic exploration, production, recycling, and reprocessing of critical minerals, and support for efforts to identify more commonly available technological alternatives to these minerals, will reduce our dependence on imports, preserve our leadership in technological innovation, support job creation, improve our national security and balance of trade, and enhance the technological superiority and readiness of our Armed Forces, which are among the Nation’s most significant consumers of critical minerals.
Sec. 2. Definition. (a) A “critical mineral” is a mineral identified by the Secretary of the Interior pursuant to subsection (b) of this section to be (i) a non-fuel mineral or mineral material essential to the economic and national security of the United States, (ii) the supply chain of which is vulnerable to disruption, and (iii) that serves an essential function in the manufacturing of a product, the absence of which would have significant consequences for our economy or our national security.
(b) The Secretary of the Interior, in coordination with the Secretary of Defense and in consultation with the heads of other relevant executive departments and agencies (agencies), shall publish a list of critical minerals in the Federal Register not later than 60 days after the date of this order, and disseminate such list to the appropriate agencies.
Sec. 3. Policy. It shall be the policy of the Federal Government to reduce the Nation’s vulnerability to disruptions in the supply of critical minerals, which constitutes a strategic vulnerability for the security and prosperity of the United States. The United States will further this policy for the benefit of the American people and in a safe and environmentally responsible manner, by:
(a) identifying new sources of critical minerals;
(b) increasing activity at all levels of the supply chain, including exploration, mining, concentration, separation, alloying, recycling, and reprocessing critical minerals;(c) ensuring that our miners and producers have electronic access to the most advanced topographic, geologic, and geophysical data within U.S. territory to the extent permitted by law and subject to appropriate limitations for purposes of privacy and security, including appropriate limitations to protect critical infrastructure data such as those related to national security areas; and
(d) streamlining leasing and permitting processes to expedite exploration, production, processing, reprocessing, recycling, and domestic refining of critical minerals.
Sec. 4. Implementation. (a) Within 180 days of the date that the Secretary of the Interior publishes a list of critical minerals under section 2 of this order, the Secretary of Commerce, in coordination with the Secretaries of Defense, the Interior, Agriculture, and Energy, and the United States Trade Representative, shall submit a report to the President through the Assistant to the President for Economic Policy, the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget, and the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy. The report shall include:
(i) a strategy to reduce the Nation’s reliance on critical minerals;
(ii) an assessment of progress toward developing critical minerals recycling and reprocessing technologies, and technological alternatives to critical minerals;
(iii) options for accessing and developing critical minerals through investment and trade with our allies and partners;
(iv) a plan to improve the topographic, geologic, and geophysical mapping of the United States and make the resulting data and metadata electronically accessible, to the extent permitted by law and subject to appropriate limitations for purposes of privacy and security, to support private sector mineral exploration of critical minerals; and
(v) recommendations to streamline permitting and review processes related to developing leases; enhancing access to critical mineral resources; and increasing discovery, production, and domestic refining of critical minerals.
(b) Agencies shall implement subsection (a) of this section in a manner consistent with, and when possible complementary to, implementation of Executive Order 13771 of January 30, 2017 (Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs), Executive Order 13783 of March 28, 2017 (Promoting Energy Independence and Economic Growth), Executive Order 13807 of August 15, 2017 (Establishing Discipline and Accountability in the Environmental Review and Permitting Process for Infrastructure Projects), and Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993 (Regulatory Planning and Review).
Sec. 5. General Provisions. (a) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:
(i) the authority granted by law to an executive department or agency, or the head thereof;
(ii) the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals; or
(iii) existing treaties or international agreements relating to mineral production, imports, or exports.
(b) This order shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.
(c) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

DONALD J. TRUMP
THE WHITE HOUSE,
December 20, 2017.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/presiden...e-secure-reliable-supplies-critical-minerals/
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Buck

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#16
China and the US will figure this out, no doubt, because there's fiat and value involved and more importantly, China has billions of people they have to keep busy, otherwise, they may end up sitting around drawing up plans for a coup, just like the communists did here only the coup in China would end up making them Capitalists
 

ZZZZZ

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#17
China and the US will figure this out, no doubt, because there's fiat and value involved and more importantly, China has billions of people they have to keep busy, otherwise, they may end up sitting around drawing up plans for a coup, just like the communists did here only the coup in China would end up making them Capitalists
Investment icon Jim Rogers has said many times: "The Chinese Communists are the best capitalists in the world."
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Buck

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#18
Investment icon Jim Rogers has said many times: "The Chinese Communists are the best capitalists in the world."
I would suspect if you ignore the fact that China has the worlds largest slave population, has very few human rights and corruption is rampant, yeah, based upon how the US leadership has manipulated 'our version' of capitalism, I'd suggest he maybe right

Eliminate all those caveats, and China is but a copy-cat economy where the leadership is scared of it's population rising up and killing them all
 

ZZZZZ

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#19
Anybody see 60 Minutes tonight? China and the Rare Earths story was the headline of the show. I'm sure CBS will post the video to their website in the coming days.

Lots of typical 60 Minutes half truths and fake news. The big omission was their failure to mention that the Mountain Pass Mine in California is controlled by Chinese interests, and all of the output is sent to China for precessing and refining. So China, not the US, essentially controls the production of rare earths extracted on US soil.
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