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Japanese Cabinet Maker - Old School

Alton

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#2
Traditional Japanese woodworking boarders on art. If you haven't worked with Japanese tools and techniques you really owe it to yourself to at least give it a shot. And yes, they use their bodies quite often for clamping and holding work pieces.

A hint on their saws and planes: They are the reverse use of western tools...saws cut as they are PULLED toward the user and planes cut as they are PULLED toward the user. Traditional Japanese chisels are sharpened on the BACK SIDE of the blade...something that should be done occasionally to western chisels AND plane blades. A sharp tool IS safer to use than even a slightly dull tool since it cuts material with less force so you have fewer accidents. Though I have and use many metal planes and scrapers I still prefer wooden planes for more "accurate communication" from material to my hands. With the right tools (called "floats") it's not too difficult to make your own planes. You can make them for using commercially available blades (irons) or you can take the time to make friends with a blacksmith or smith your own irons. Refurbishing "old/used/junk " irons is also a useful skill to develop and easy on the wallet. It's fun making your own tools!
 

Uncle

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#4
His tongues and grooves or dovetails are not equally spaced. See 3:40-ish.

Does he cut one side and use that to measure the other?

I'm no wood-worker, just curious.

Golden Regards
Uncle
 

nickndfl

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The reason why Japanese planes are different is because they believe the spirit of the wood should be pulled toward the craftsman instead of pushed away. They think it improves their workmanship.
 

newmisty

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Traditional Japanese woodworking boarders on art. If you haven't worked with Japanese tools and techniques you really owe it to yourself to at least give it a shot. And yes, they use their bodies quite often for clamping and holding work pieces.

A hint on their saws and planes: They are the reverse use of western tools...saws cut as they are PULLED toward the user and planes cut as they are PULLED toward the user. Traditional Japanese chisels are sharpened on the BACK SIDE of the blade...something that should be done occasionally to western chisels AND plane blades. A sharp tool IS safer to use than even a slightly dull tool since it cuts material with less force so you have fewer accidents. Though I have and use many metal planes and scrapers I still prefer wooden planes for more "accurate communication" from material to my hands. With the right tools (called "floats") it's not too difficult to make your own planes. You can make them for using commercially available blades (irons) or you can take the time to make friends with a blacksmith or smith your own irons. Refurbishing "old/used/junk " irons is also a useful skill to develop and easy on the wallet. It's fun making your own tools!
Boarders on art? It IS one of the original arts!

The Chinese built temples hundreds of feet high, using NO FASTENERS that withstand earthquakes and stand for 1000's of years. They are built to house precious relics and withstand dramatic earth changes.

Here's a picture of me talking about the small one behind me, located in NY. I talked to the architect of this temple and a larger version nearby,and was flabbergasted to learn that a 50 ft Temple built like this, from Eastern yellow cedar, will grow or lose 3' of height through expansion and contraction. There are NO FASTENERS and NO GLUE used to build these rather a cable is anchored to the ground in the center and pulls down from it's peak. The larger Temple down the road was all pre cut, by hand, by 30 people for 3 years before being assembled.


TEMPLESM3.jpg

Photo1443.jpg

The japanese take joinery to a whole different level:



joints.png

And their intricate ornamentation is simply peerless:


I think they're good at maths and stuff.
 

newmisty

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#7
The reason why Japanese planes are different is because they believe the spirit of the wood should be pulled toward the craftsman instead of pushed away. They think it improves their workmanship.
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