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Microtonal guitars

ErrosionOfAccord

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#3
They definitely sound wierd to us westerners that are used to the conventional 12-note octave. I considered trying one, but I don't have enough fingers.

BTW, thumbs up on the CoC reference on your screen name!
Handle is CoC with synonyms hence, the misspelling of erosion.
 

AgBar

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#6
It sounds out-of-tune to me.
Because it is. Literally. He's playing in between the 12-tone octave that most of us are used to. (Mostly quarter-tones, it sounds like.) To me, it's interesting as an exercise, but I'm probably not listening to this every day. The 12-tone scales are there for a reason.
 

skychief

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#7
He's playing in between the 12-tone octave that most of us are used to. (Mostly quarter-tones, it sounds like.) To me, it's interesting as an exercise, but I'm probably not listening to this every day.
I play a string bass, and I have found that on the lower notes, playing slightly gives a nice fatness to the sound. But that's just maybe an eighth-tone (or even less) flat. On the higher notes, being a little flat on intonation is really noticeable (and undesirable).
 

Goldhedge

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#8
I play a string bass, and I have found that on the lower notes, playing slightly gives a nice fatness to the sound. But that's just maybe an eighth-tone (or even less) flat. On the higher notes, being a little flat on intonation is really noticeable (and undesirable).
There are 2 notes for every note. Violin players (string bass - no frets) will tell you that.

Equal vs Just tuning

The equal tempered piano is an approximation of 'correct pitch'.

I play guitar and for years didn't understand why tuning harmonically was different than with a tuner. Fiddle-farted around with adjusting this and that.
 

AgBar

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#9
I play a string bass, and I have found that on the lower notes, playing slightly gives a nice fatness to the sound. But that's just maybe an eighth-tone (or even less) flat. On the higher notes, being a little flat on intonation is really noticeable (and undesirable).
Yeah, tuning is definitely more noticeable at higher pitch.

I'm guessing you play fret-less bass to give you that control?

EDIT: oh, duh, or do you mean upright bass?

There are 2 notes for every note. Violin players (string bass - no frets) will tell you that.

Equal vs Just tuning

The equal tempered piano is an approximation of 'correct pitch'.

I play guitar and for years didn't understand why tuning harmonically was different than with a tuner. Fiddle-farted around with adjusting this and that.
Oh, now we're off into the weeds!! :) Nice!

Equal temperament, or equal tuning if you prefer, was one of Bach's many great contributions, allowing one instrument to approximate all of the diatonic scales: 7 modes off of the 12 tones.

On my keyboards I can switch from equal to true tuning for a given key. It's a subtle, but also fascinating effect. My ears aren't quite good enough to resolve the details, but the change in the overall feeling of just a simple scale is palpable.
 

GOLDZILLA

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#10
it would be cool to have one of these just for messing around with but I would never take one on stage.
 

skychief

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#11
Yeah, tuning is definitely more noticeable at higher pitch.

I'm guessing you play fret-less bass to give you that control?

EDIT: oh, duh, or do you mean upright bass?
A "string bass" is the same thing as an upright bass.

Just different names for the same critter! ;)

Some even call it a "doghouse" bass!
 

Goldhedge

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#13
I call an electric bass a 'bass guitar'.

A string bass has a subtleness, a warmth to it that just can't be had with an electric - even if it's a fretless electric.

Those new-fangled upright/electric bass-stick like a bass on a diet - come close to an upright.

They even fold up for traveling...