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Selling Disks With Free Microsoft Software Leads to Prison Term

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Hypophthalmichthys molitrix
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#1
Microsoft filed criminal charges against an e-waste recycler named Eric Lundgren. A federal court has determined that Lundgren will serve a 15-month prison sentence and will be forced to pay a $50,000 fine.
HotHardWare

Lundgren had taken to downloading free software that Microsoft offers to Windows users commonly called restore disks. Lundgren's idea was to make these discs available to computer recycling shops so that they wouldn't need to make the disks themselves. He also wanted to provide the disks to PC owners who might not know how to make their own.

The key point here is that the restore discs are given to anyone who buys a computer with a licensed version of Windows on it and the software is free to download. Reports indicate that the disks are useless to anyone without a legitimately purchased Windows license. Lundgren made 28,000 of these disks and shipped them to a Florida broker to sell for a quarter each.

Mickysoft runs out the same old bullshit about counterfeit software disguised as legitimate when all the guy was trying to do was make it easier for the common guy — ya still need that license, and what, a quarter each? Isn't that about break-even price for a blank DVD?

BF
 

oldgaranddad

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Yet another reason that their market share continues to diminish.

I just read a tech article that states in companies were employees can choose their desktop, 70% choose Apple.

I’ll be the first to admit that Apple is far from a saint but they are a lot better than Microsoft and that is coming from a former MS fanboy.
 

gringott

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I am seriously considering moving to a flavor of Unix or Linux. They have corrupted windows so bad it is almost unusable. I would have left long ago if I didn't have apps that were not present in other flavors. I don't like MAC's OS so I won't be going that direction although we have some.
 

oldgaranddad

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I am seriously considering moving to a flavor of Unix or Linux. They have corrupted windows so bad it is almost unusable. I would have left long ago if I didn't have apps that were not present in other flavors. I don't like MAC's OS so I won't be going that direction although we have some.
For a desktop OS I’d recommend Linux Mint. I’m not a big fan of Ubuntu but I have to admit the developers of this distribution did pretty good job.
 

gringott

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I have tried both in the past, neither grabbed me.

I will set up a machine and start testing recent flavors and see what's up.

My only real concern is migrating my almost 200 TBs of storage to a new system. No easy task. I may just keep that on M$ and slowly migrate stuff to a new system. Not something you do overnight.
 

Ensoniq

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#7
All Mac at home but Microsoft at work

Resisting going higher than windows 7 (4chan says windows 10 is a virus)

7 is running out of support life

My IT guy tells me I have agree to being audited by Micro if I upgrade, or they will refuse to sell it
 

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Hypophthalmichthys molitrix
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#8
Just go with the flow you guys. Keep one machine, off the internet, for all your financial, storage, etc — the one that you do all your work on, and another one that is running the newest OS for playing on the internet, and for email. If you need to move files between computers use sneaker net.
my almost 200 TBs of storage
Why do you have to migrate anything? How do you have 200 TBs set up? Must be 25 eight TB drives — a whole buncha storage. Gads!! I thought I had too much data when I had to move up to a 6 TB drive for archiving my backups.

I just move my storage drives to the new machine when I need to build a new one, after all there is no OS on the data drive, right? As far a data storage goes, an external USB connected drive work just fine and there's no problem encountered when you switch them over to a new computer, even if you have installed a new operating system. If you have it set up as a NAS then there is no migration either.

Just wonderin how you do it, Sir Gringo — not trying to break yer balls.

BF
 

gringott

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Just go with the flow you guys. Keep one machine, off the internet, for all your financial, storage, etc — the one that you do all your work on, and another one that is running the newest OS for playing on the internet, and for email. If you need to move files between computers use sneaker net.

Why do you have to migrate anything? How do you have 200 TBs set up? Must be 25 eight TB drives — a whole buncha storage. Gads!! I thought I had too much data when I had to move up to a 6 TB drive for archiving my backups.

I just move my storage drives to the new machine when I need to build a new one, after all there is no OS on the data drive, right? As far a data storage goes, an external USB connected drive work just fine and there's no problem encountered when you switch them over to a new computer, even if you have installed a new operating system. If you have it set up as a NAS then there is no migration either.

Just wonderin how you do it, Sir Gringo — not trying to break yer balls.

BF
I'll try to answer your questions as best I can, if I leave anything out, ask again. Sorry for such a long winded response, don't read it if you don't like the length.

I do not have a NAS. IMHO the typical "home" NAS system is too expensive, too wasteful, and too limited for my needs. I have what is called DAS, direct attached storage. For most of my data storage I use SAS controllers and expansion cards. My storage server and DAS were built by me, and cost me far less than any NAS out there that would come even close to the same performance.

I do have a few legacy external eSata drive cases in use, also as DAS, for "scratch" use - temporary file storage, while processing etc. Each holds four drives. These are not connected to my main server.

USB external drives are normally made to be only used for a short time, then disconnected or shut down. Most have no fan and poor air circulation. Hence the normal 1 year warranty on most vs. 3 years for the same exact drive used internally. All drives fail, eventually, a modern external USB drive left on 24/7 [and used - not sleeping] will fail in a hurry. Try leaving yours on and run a program that reports your SMART data and temperatures. Latest Seagate and WD externals I have used overheat in about 1 hour or less of actual use. Meaning file copying. Greatly reducing the drive life IMHO. Speeds have improved over the years, but to use them in the manner I use them is a no go, they are not suited to the purpose. They have been used with varying success but sometimes failure and data loss [by others]. For example they sometimes disconnect during a file transfer. The latest Thunderbolt is great [and the PC version] however go look up the price - a four disk external case costs as much as my server - DAS combo cost me.

I have a huge collection of media, which is able to be accessed over the intranet with ease, and files processed and transferred with ease. Not only wouldn't sneaker net cut it, I actually moved my main machines to 10Gbe to make moving the files around easier. A typical 2160p movie can be over 50GB. I was a sneaker-net guy years ago, back in the mid-1990's, until I created my first home network [BNC]. I haven't looked back. Heck, we were experimenting with networking SCSI drives back then - pretty funny. Some people mow their lawn with a pair of scissors, some use a manual push mower, power push mower, or riding lawn mower, or even a tractor. I guess it depends on how much you have to do, how much time you have on your hands, and how you want to do it. Different strokes for different folks.

In addition, I can't imagine what a hassle it would be to have 20 -30 external drives, disconnected, and have to figure out which drive has what so I can stream a vid or listen to a song etc. To me, it would make my media basically a hassle and unusable, so if I was to go your route, sneaker-net or external drives, well, I wouldn't even bother. Waste of time and money if you can't use it IMHO. Example - my music collection built up over decades. I ripped everything to the drive pool and stored the CDs. Any music I have I can access in a second. I haven't touched a disc or a disc player in years. Same with DVDs and Blu Rays. I have also done this with our old VHS collection, just the stuff that never came out in some other format.

My method of storage, which I have been using for over 10 years, started when MS Home Server came out. It came with a robust for the time system of "pooling" drives of various sizes without RAID in a JBOD fashion. Your total storage was presented to you as one drive. You could duplicate files on two different disks for safety or not. It also had de-duplication built in, which was handy as it did automatic full backups of all your network PCs. You could browse the images to retrieve a file for example. Great tech for the time. Cheap too.

As time went on and they moved it up the server versions [started at Server 2003] they, as they always do, made it worse and worse. I eventually migrated off it for several reasons
1. It was restricted to only use one CPU - I like to multi-task and this crippled my server.
2. The drive pooling went to the "new" storage spaces which sucked.
3. It was basically an app that ran on the latest Server, poorly.

A guy came out with software for drive pooling called Drive Pool, much like the original but modernized with nice disk and data storage add-ons. It could replace the pooling in Home Server or run alone on any MS OS, desktop or server. I moved to that and it is great. Drives are formatted in NTFS. Any drive can be removed and the files accessed directly on another computer. Moving or migrating pools between PCs or Servers is not a problem, just install the software and move the drives. It uses information stored on the drives to recreate the pool. It also can use SSD drives as a "landing zone" or poor man's drive tier, files first moved to the pool are put there, which vastly speeds up file transfers over straight to disk, later they are migrated to spinning disks when there is no activity. Many other features, some I use, some I don't.

This software does not run on anything but Windows, period. So at the least, I would have to use something on the other OS that is something like Drive Pool, then connect each drive and transfer the files over to this new system. Or transfer them over the network. I call that migration. The way the files are stored could be a nightmare on another system to just "plug them in". I suspect it would not work well, and I could suffer a lot of potential data loss. We did a lot of migrations like this where I worked, trust me, we didn't just "plug drives in" and hope for the best. We migrated the files and tested everything before we got rid of the sources. To me it is the common sense thing to do.

I don't want the hassle or waste of RAID, I worked in network storage for years, a business has mission critical data etc that must be protected, damn the cost. I understand that. However, most of my data is easily protected for my needs by simple duplication on two separate drives. More critical "personal" data I also back up to removable drive that I store elsewhere, but that is a relatively small amount. Some stuff for long term storage I burn to M-discs said to be good for a thousand years lol, stuff like family videos and pictures, legal documents etc. Not for me, but for my family.

I also process various media files, many tools I use are also available in versions for MacOS & Unix - Linux, so that would not be a problem, but a few things I use are only Windows - making it a little harder.

There are thousands of setups out there, I don't fault any of them, to each for his or her needs. Your needs seem very basic and very 1990's, so I get what you are doing. However, what you do is not for everyone. No offense. You might want to take a look at setups people have on the net, such as people that use Plex or XBMC now KODI, these programs are made to access large collections, sneaker-net is not in their vocabulary.

Oh, I have used various Unix & Linux flavors, MacOSes, Amiga, C/PM, DOS, C=64 etc, both at work and at home. I am no stranger to these systems. I migrated to Windows about year 2000 [at home] from Amiga and Unix. It was the easy thing to do at the time for the kids and wife.

We have tried to go MAC the last couple of years, but the wife dislikes it and [personally] I do not like the OS. I find it worse than Windows. Made for those who want to be surface dwellers and not dig down IMHO, and have very basic needs i.e. email and internet. I think a chromebook would be good enough for them and save a bundle. But again, if another person likes it, more power to them. I have zero tech stocks, don't care what anybody but me uses.
 

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Hypophthalmichthys molitrix
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#10
Ya know some peoples have about a hundred old computers layin around collecting dust so they like to play around with them as they can be utilized for all kinds of interesting things. I have computers running camera security and sensor security, wife has one for U-Tubes, I have another for building drawings, this one here to futz around on the interwebs, one to run an old (built like a battleship) scanner, a laptop or two, a couple of them waiting around for assignment and my frankenstien desktop.

I see that you have a large investment (data speaking) in media files which are always notoriously large any how, but my needs are more pedestrian what with most of my photos being smaller than 20-30 Mbs each. Most of my music is rock n roll and old shit on cds and scronged on MP3s for my listening pleasure. Guess a buncha disks have always been sufficient for me (JBOD). Three, four Tbs each are about the right size for me in my workin machines. The other machines get hand-me-downs.

I have wired in networks and, like you, I started in the late 90s with 10base2 cable wiring runs here and there. Now its all Cat5e, run in by a professional (me) to every room and numerous locations outside (security cameras). I can divide my network up as I see fit, with different switches and routers. But the only place I use sneaker net (because I keep it OFF the internet) is to my main computer, which is running win7, when I need to up/down load some file or the other. I can also switch out the OS on it (different SSDs), disconnect my data drives and connect it to the interweb to do business and kick it off again when I'm done.

I guess what I had when I ran a remote site construction office was a DAS. It was attached to the server and we had about 25-30 clients on the network, draftsmen (and draftswomen) along with project mangers, and miscellaneous office people — was in the 1990s — Novell Networking at that time. Novell accessed the drive station through a couple of bad expensive SCSI cards. That system was almost impossible to migrate, you had to run Novell to do anything to it. At any rate it was no where near 200TB in size, if I remember right it was something like 400GB.

So you're not really stuck with mickysoft, you're just stuck with finding a replacement industrial duty, large storage array that can run with Linux (Unix, whatever) and doesn't cost you an arm and a leg. Then you can look forward to a four day babysitting job of transferring the files.

So, yeah, I see why you are agonizing upgrading. I am going to start looking into win10 myself here pretty soon. (If it works, it doesn't have enough features. - Windows 10 design philosophy) I will load it up on the wife unit's U-Tube machine — she'll give it a workout (honey this don't work, honey how do I do that , etc). I ain't gonna put it on Frank for quite a while. I know I can use it to run my security cameras, I just don't know if its going to be able to run the hardware I have there already without killing it with overhead. We'll see...

BF
Naw, gringo, its not too long, I'm used to readin :brb:
Edited to add windoze design philosophy statement
 
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