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targeting cities with shrinking populations

EO 11110

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#1
would moving to a city with a shrinking population be an astute move? real estate, land are cheap, an older population that is not seeking the next big thing. overbuilt infrastructure, vibrants leaving for areas with better 'benefits', etc

no detroit - more like old logging/miningmaufacturing cities that are fading away gracefully
 

TAEZZAR

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#3
would moving to a city with a shrinking population be an astute move? real estate, land are cheap, an older population that is not seeking the next big thing. overbuilt infrastructure, vibrants leaving for areas with better 'benefits', etc

no detroit - more like old logging/miningmaufacturing cities that are fading away gracefully
Go back, go back, yer increasing our sedate population !!!

Less folks to pay taxes.
Not really, the tax thieves still getcha, but, certainly less wage earners to pay taxes.
 

EO 11110

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#4
tax increases could be avoided by shrinking gov to match the decreasing population.

to make that claim (of decreasing pop driving up taxes) one would also have to claim that increasing populations lower taxes. i've seen no evidence of that.

it seems to me that tax increases are independent of population expansion/contraction
 

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#5
One disadvantage of moving to a city with a declining population is that your investment in real estate there may also decline.

Question: Why move to a city at all?
 

GOLDZILLA

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#7
Better off to move to a small nowhere that is an hour or 2 away from the big city that you can visit once in a while when you want to.
 

TAEZZAR

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#8
Better off to move to a small nowhere that is an hour or 2 away from the big city that you can visit once in a while when you want to.
I'm there !:2 thumbs up:
 

oldgaranddad

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#9
tax increases could be avoided by shrinking gov to match the decreasing population...
Government never shrinks. Even if they want to the civil service unions won’t let them do it.

The only remedy to a failing/shrinking city is to dissolve and reorganize but no politician will go there.
 

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#10
Give an example of a city you are talking about? I've found moving to a desirable area outside of commuting distance is a decent strategy - but they end growing out to you after a while. The US has gone from 200 million in 1970 to 320 million in 2018, with uncounted millions of illegals - everywhere desirable is getting squeezed.
 

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#11
tax increases could be avoided by shrinking gov to match the decreasing population.
does not work that way, IDK it doesn't. Lived in many a logging town and the gumbyment never went down in size. Seems the f'ers like it there also, in fact when/after I got hurt I had to move out because there was nothing for me to do to pay the bills and its not like I can work indoors around the flakes of snow.
 

GOLDBRIX

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#12
I'd consider why the population is shrinking?
99% of the time it because of high taxes or the threat there of and lack of economic advancement.
My brother moved from North Carolina due to the state changing it's tax laws to consider higher middle class workers as RICH People.
Before that he left Illinois due to increased state taxes to support Chicago's failings.
 

EO 11110

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#13
Give an example of a city you are talking about? I've found moving to a desirable area outside of commuting distance is a decent strategy - but they end growing out to you after a while. The US has gone from 200 million in 1970 to 320 million in 2018, with uncounted millions of illegals - everywhere desirable is getting squeezed.
erie, pa is the one that got me thnking. it is gradually losing population

not a perfect match to what i described - but when i visited there several years ago i was shocked at the real estate prices on big beautiful old homes.

it sits right on the lake, has a minor league baseball team, etc. crime is too high though...and the winters would drive me nuts

ideally i would find something closer to the equator
 

Silver

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#15
water + sewer + internet
Even unincorporated towns have water, sewer, and internet - I've lived in a couple of them. Water and sewer can be from a taxing water district or a community non-profit, internet from private companies.

The town I live in now has water and sewer from a non-profit - $65 a month for 3500 gallons and sewer, 90 for 7000 - pure mountain aquifer water. $100 a month for internet from the best provider, other cheaper options available. 8 cents a kilowatt hour for power. Natural gas available.

If you really want to be close to the equator, try Quito, Ecuador, the best climate I've experienced, spring type weather year round - wet/dry season.

You can visit cheap - $19 a day and live like a local.

http://casaelaine.com/index.php/en/mainmenu-en
 

hoarder

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#16
water + sewer + internet
I'm in one of the remotest parts of the country. Water well provides water (no water bill), Septic tank and drain field handles the wastewater and I have DSL, soon to be fiber optic.
One factor in a decision to move to a dying city is whether you're retired of still working. If it's the latter, don't you think a city which is losing population is doing so because of a loss of jobs?
 

EO 11110

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#17
Even unincorporated towns have water, sewer, and internet - I've lived in a couple of them. Water and sewer can be from a taxing water district or a community non-profit, internet from private companies.

The town I live in now has water and sewer from a non-profit - $65 a month for 3500 gallons and sewer, 90 for 7000 - pure mountain aquifer water. $100 a month for internet from the best provider, other cheaper options available. 8 cents a kilowatt hour for power. Natural gas available.

If you really want to be close to the equator, try Quito, Ecuador, the best climate I've experienced, spring type weather year round - wet/dry season.

You can visit cheap - $19 a day and live like a local.

http://casaelaine.com/index.php/en/mainmenu-en
what state are you in? around my parts -- se texas, no city = no water, no sewer....maybe internet
 

EO 11110

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#18
I'm in one of the remotest parts of the country. Water well provides water (no water bill), Septic tank and drain field handles the wastewater and I have DSL, soon to be fiber optic.
One factor in a decision to move to a dying city is whether you're retired of still working. If it's the latter, don't you think a city which is losing population is doing so because of a loss of jobs?
put this in the preps/homestead section b/c looking to preserve money and increase safety, quality of life

current situation is suburban houston -- shithole central. so looking up from there
 
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Silver

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#19
what state are you in? around my parts -- se texas, no city = no water, no sewer....maybe internet
Far West Texas. I also lived in an unincorporated town in the Hill Country, taxing entity for water and sewer, co-op for electricity, private co. natural gas, private internet - still that way. Lots of growth in the area - noticed when I passed through there recently they were expanding the sewer plant.
 

hoarder

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#20
put this in the preps/homestead section b/c looking to preserve money and increase safety, quality of life

current situation is suburban houston -- shithole central. so looking up from there
From Houston, anywhere is up. I wouldn't move to any city or town to increase safety or quality of life though.
around my parts -- se texas, no city = no water, no sewer....maybe internet
You mean no city water and city sewer or do you mean no groundwater no septic permits? Internet is available almost everywhere these days.
 

EO 11110

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#21
From Houston, anywhere is up. I wouldn't move to any city or town to increase safety or quality of life though.
You mean no city water and city sewer or do you mean no groundwater no septic permits? Internet is available almost everywhere these days.
i meant no water/sewer systems outside of the cities (in my area).

not a fan of well + septic - that's the thing that keeps me from moving to the country
 

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#22
i meant no water/sewer systems outside of the cities (in my area).

not a fan of well + septic - that's the thing that keeps me from moving to the country
Why? Wells and septic systems are usually capital improvements that you can get your money back out of when you sell the land. In most cases solidifies the value of the property against any future restrictions on development.
Less bills to pay every month.
 

Silver

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#23
i meant no water/sewer systems outside of the cities (in my area).

not a fan of well + septic - that's the thing that keeps me from moving to the country
Well water can be excellent in the right places, I had a 240' well drilled on some rural property near Fredericksburg and hit sweet water with good flow. Other neighbors had to drill down 600' and the water was very mineralized and needed treatment, and a large pump.

Septic can be tricky, in some places that used to allow conventional systems, are forcing people to put in aerobic systems - which requires a maintenance contract. Aerobic systems spray the treated sewage like a sprinkler system. One neighbor would get misted sitting on the porch when the wind kicked up...

But, if you get a good well and septic, you have your own utility system and it can't be beat - no bills, no worries.
 

hoarder

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#24
If you have city water, flouride and chlorine are a fact of life.
 

EO 11110

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#25
If you have city water, flouride and chlorine are a fact of life.
i try to beat that by drinking bottled water. dont know if my brand has it or not -- ozarka is the brand
 

EO 11110

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#26
Why? Wells and septic systems are usually capital improvements that you can get your money back out of when you sell the land. In most cases solidifies the value of the property against any future restrictions on development.
Less bills to pay every month.
my 3 concerns -- crappy water from well, septic spraying who-knows-what all over my property, repairs/maintenance on the equipment
 
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EO 11110

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#27
Well water can be excellent in the right places, I had a 240' well drilled on some rural property near Fredericksburg and hit sweet water with good flow. Other neighbors had to drill down 600' and the water was very mineralized and needed treatment, and a large pump.

Septic can be tricky, in some places that used to allow conventional systems, are forcing people to put in aerobic systems - which requires a maintenance contract. Aerobic systems spray the treated sewage like a sprinkler system. One neighbor would get misted sitting on the porch when the wind kicked up...

But, if you get a good well and septic, you have your own utility system and it can't be beat - no bills, no worries.
not a fan of the mist or the water. the well water around here is a major step down from city water - maybe all the ones i've experienced are too shallow. i've sampled 10ish from family/friends.
 
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hoarder

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#28
i try to beat that by drinking bottled water. dont know if my brand has it or not -- ozarka is the brand
Then you have to find a way to beat the BPA and all the other chemical crap in the plastic.
my 3 concerns -- crappy water from well, septic spraying who-knows-what all over my property, repairs/maintenance on the equipment
Aerobic systems are actually pretty rare. They do it in bedrock and riparian areas. Maintenance on conventional systems which are not overloaded is basically nil.
"Crappy water" is not definitive. You mean taste crappy or bad for you? You can get an undersink reverse osmosis for under $300. I've had a couple of them and they work good. Great to have if your well produces hard water.
I remember when I lived in the Corpus area all the wells were extremely shallow. Sand is a good filter. On Padre Island you can punch a well just about anywhere and get good water no salinity.
I think you got your pros and cons reversed. Country living is great!
 

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not a fan of the mist or the water. the well water around here is a major step down from city water - maybe all the ones i've experienced are too shallow. i've sampled 10ish from family/friends.
Come to the Ozarks. Big City convenience in a small town environment,