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These Are the 50 Cheapest Countries in the World, Study Finds

Scorpio

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#1
These Are the 50 Cheapest Countries in the World, Study Finds
Countries with the cheapest cost of living can save you money.


Here are the 50 cheapest countries to call home, with No. 1 being the cheapest:

1. India
2. Saudi Arabia
3. Pakistan
4. Tunisia
5. Zambia
6. Ukraine
7. Mexico
8. Egypt
9. Bangladesh
10. Macedonia
11. Romania
12. Algeria
13. Bosnia and Herzegovina
14. South Africa
15. Malaysia
16. Georgia
17. Bolivia
18. Nepal
19. Moldova
20. Colombia
21. Morocco
22. Poland
23. Iran
24. Philippines
25. Bulgaria
26. Turkey
27. Belarus
28. Oman
29. Serbia
30. Albania
31. Kazakhstan
32. Syria
33. Uganda
34. Armenia
35. Azerbaijan
36. Sri Lanka
37. China
38. Indonesia
39. Czech Republic
40. Montenegro
41. Peru
42. Iraq
43. Kenya
44. Vietnam
45. Slovakia
46. Taiwan
47. Honduras
48. Ecuador
49. Nigeria
50. Hungary



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https://www.gobankingrates.com/saving-money/cheapest-countries-in-the-world-to-live/
 

JayDubya

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#3
Alright, I'll play...

Let's take into account:
What's my tax implications?
What's the infrastructure like? Is there good public transportation? Or do I need a vehicle? Or can I walk to everything I need?
What's their healthcare like? Quality? Reliable? Is it accessible or are there long wait times?
Are there grocery stores? Or are there small neighborhoods markets?
Are their goods and services comparable to the quality I am used to?
What's the weather like?
Do I feel comfortable there? Do I have anything in common with the people? Will I be able to have a comfortable conversation?
Do I feel safe there?
 

gringott

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#4
JayDubya, you listed most of the things a person needs to be absolutely sure about before deciding to move somewhere outside their home country.
Cheap living does not necessarily mean cheap for you! You have to know what standard of living they are talking about.

Note Mexico on the list at number 7. I have lived there. Yes, it can be very cheap. If you are willing to live in a small remote village, live in a stick shack, eat mostly government corn tortillas, walk everywhere [not much of that, nowhere to go or should I say not worth going to]. If you want to live in a nice place with plenty of nice shopping, things to do, with pretty much all the mod cons like you have here, well, not so cheap. Plus it looks like many places that were once safe in Mexico are increasingly NOT SAFE. Plus I would add that medical services decrease the further you go into the sticks.

Note Saudi Arabia at number 2. I am quite sure that is for locals, not expats. The government most likely subsidizes a lot of their living expenses.

Note the Philippines is two numbers below Poland. That one seems really weird. I haven't been to the Philippines, but I considered it a bit below Poland in living standards and a lot cheaper. Something seems wrong with this list.
 

gringott

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#5
I went to the site and got this:

Methodology: Using information from online pricing database Numbeo.com, GOBankingRates assessed foreign nations to determine which were the most budget-friendly. Measuring each against prices found in New York City, we weighted and ranked countries based on these key affordability metrics: 1) Local purchasing power index: Measures the relative purchasing power of a typical salary in the country. A lower purchasing power buys fewer goods, while a higher purchasing power buys more; 2) Rent index: Includes typical home rental prices in the country; 3) Groceries index: Includes typical grocery prices in the country; 4) Cost of living index: Includes costs of local goods and services, such as restaurants, transportation and utilities; and 5) Restaurant price index: A comparison of prices of meals and drinks in restaurants and bars.