• Same story, different day...........year ie more of the same fiat floods the world
  • There are no markets
  • "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"

To hell with this, let's find an atoll.

ErrosionOfAccord

#1 Global Warmer
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
2,989
Likes
2,978
Location
Coal Country
#1
The Self-Made Castaway Who Spent 16 Years on an Atoll With His Cats
ByElla Morton
SEPTEMBER 21, 2015
5,026
Suwarrow/Creative Commons)

The phrase “sole survivor” evokes scenes of violent disaster—a plane crash; an explosion in a mine; the eruption of a volcano whose lava destroys a city and all its inhabitantsbut one. The horrific details make an indelible impression on the survivors and those who hear their stories. One woman survived a Peruvian plane crash that killed 91 and stumbled injured through the jungle for days, during which she had todig out 30 maggots that had burrowed into a gaping wound on her arm. In 2005, a man survived theSago mine explosion that released toxic methane and carbon monoxide, slowly killing his 11 co-workers as they wrote final letters to their loved ones.

These are traumatic tales. But not all sole survivors have been through a hell unleashed on them by fates beyond their control. Another kind of “sole survivor” is one who survives solo. Take the story of Tom Neale, dumped by boat on a tiny atoll in the Pacific, where he lived alone for 16 years. Neale, a New Zealander, rode out violent storms in a rickety shack, ate a diet heavy on fish and coconuts, and wore nothing but a loincloth. It is the remarkable tale of a shipwrecked survivor, but for one detail: Neale did not land on the atoll by accident or during a terrible storm. He traveled there willingly and enthusiastically, determined to live a simple, solitary existence on an island he could call his own.

Formerly a shopkeeper, Neale became fixated on the tiny Cook Island atoll of Suwarrow (also known as Suvorov) in 1943, whenauthor and traveler Robert Frisbie spoke of it to him after visiting. In his memoir, An Island to Oneself, Neale wrote of their conversation:

That afternoon Frisbee entranced me, and I can see him now on the veranda, the rum bottle on the big table between us, leaning forward with that blazing characteristic earnestness, saying to me, “Tom Neale, Suvorov is the most beautiful place on earth, and no man has really lived until he has lived there.”

In 1945, a ship passed by Suwarrow—which is 200 miles from the nearest populated land—to drop off supplies for the coastwatchers New Zealand had stationed there during World War II. Neale hitched a ride and saw Suwarrow’s gently swaying palm trees, pristine sands, and soothing turquoise waters firsthand. Enchanted, he decided he simply must live there.




More...
http://www.atlasobscura.com/article...utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=atlas-page
 

ErrosionOfAccord

#1 Global Warmer
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
2,989
Likes
2,978
Location
Coal Country
#4
I'd settle for either but I'm taking dibs on Maryann if it's going to be the latter. Might be best to let Professur decide since he has experience. He has to come along anyway because he might have some magical spores.
 

Txkstew

New Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2010
Messages
17
Likes
31
Location
S.E.Texas
#5
I lived on a Military Base on Kwajalein Atoll for 3 1/2 years. It had every amenity and recreation facility one could wish for. I've missed being there for 45 years now, but at times, all I could think about was getting off that 3 mile by 1/2 mile rock.

Pic is not Kwaj as we called it, but is one of the many outer islands.

262-MMS-1452693918-attachment1-Kwaj_Atoll_1.jpg
 

REO 54

Midas Member
Midas Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2010
Messages
6,546
Likes
4,634
#6
I'd settle for either but I'm taking dibs on Maryann if it's going to be the latter. Might be best to let Professur decide since he has experience. He has to come along anyway because he might have some magical spores.

Ah, good 'ole SchroomisEGloomis. The Professur was on the right track .....
 

ErrosionOfAccord

#1 Global Warmer
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
2,989
Likes
2,978
Location
Coal Country
#8
By Nick Squires in Sydney

6:45PM BST 15 Apr 2008


It was blasted by the largest nuclear weapon ever detonated by the United States but half a century on, Bikini Atoll supports a stunning array of tropical coral, scientists have found.

In 1954 the South Pacific atoll was rocked by a 15 megatonne hydrogen bomb 1,000 times more powerful than the explosives dropped on Hiroshima.

The explosion shook islands more than 100 miles away, generated a wave of heat measuring 99,000ºF and spread mist-like radioactive fallout as far as Japan and Australia.

But, much to the surprise of a team of research divers who explored the area, the mile-wide crater left by the detonation has made a remarkable recovery and is now home to a thriving underwater ecosystem.

Bravo crater was ground zero for the test of the thermonuclear warhead on Bikini Atoll, in the remote Marshall Islands.

"I didn't know what to expect, some kind of moonscape perhaps. But it was incredible," Zoe Richards, from James Cook University in Australia, said. "We saw … plenty of fish, corals and action going on, some really striking individual colonies."

The scientists - from Australia, the US, Germany, Italy and the Marshall Islands - found corals up to 24 ft high with 10 inch thick trunks.

While surrounding islands remain contaminated and unfit for human habitation, healthy marine species were probably propelled by strong winds and currents from nearby Rongelap Atoll, which was not bombed in the atomic tests of 1946-58.

"The team thinks that Rongelap Atoll is potentially seeding Bikini's recovery because it is the second-largest atoll in the world with a huge amount of coral reef diversity and biomass and lies upstream from Bikini," said Ms Richards, from the government-backed Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies.

While much marine life had been re-established, the researchers found that at least 28 species of coral previously found in the area had become locally extinct.

The team was commissioned by the Marshall Islands government to investigate Bikini for the first time since the tests, partly to see if a small diving industry could safely be expanded.

The waters around Bikini are littered with wrecks of World War Two decommissioned ships sunk during the tests, including the aircraft carrier USS Saratoga and the former Japanese flagship HIJMS Nagato, from which Admiral Yamoto gave the order to attack Pearl Harbour.

Ms Richards said the ability of Bikini's corals to bounce back from "a single huge destructive event" was proof of their resilience.

That did not mean, however, that the threat to coral reefs around the world from climate change had been overstated.

I think the rest is climate change hype.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ear...ife-flourishes-at-Bikini-Atoll-test-site.html
 

Zed

Size doesn't count!
Midas Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
11,495
Likes
8,869
Location
Springfield
#10
By Nick Squires in Sydney

6:45PM BST 15 Apr 2008


It was blasted by the largest nuclear weapon ever detonated by the United States but half a century on, Bikini Atoll supports a stunning array of tropical coral, scientists have found.

In 1954 the South Pacific atoll was rocked by a 15 megatonne hydrogen bomb 1,000 times more powerful than the explosives dropped on Hiroshima.

The explosion shook islands more than 100 miles away, generated a wave of heat measuring 99,000ºF and spread mist-like radioactive fallout as far as Japan and Australia.

But, much to the surprise of a team of research divers who explored the area, the mile-wide crater left by the detonation has made a remarkable recovery and is now home to a thriving underwater ecosystem.

Bravo crater was ground zero for the test of the thermonuclear warhead on Bikini Atoll, in the remote Marshall Islands.

"I didn't know what to expect, some kind of moonscape perhaps. But it was incredible," Zoe Richards, from James Cook University in Australia, said. "We saw … plenty of fish, corals and action going on, some really striking individual colonies."

The scientists - from Australia, the US, Germany, Italy and the Marshall Islands - found corals up to 24 ft high with 10 inch thick trunks.

While surrounding islands remain contaminated and unfit for human habitation, healthy marine species were probably propelled by strong winds and currents from nearby Rongelap Atoll, which was not bombed in the atomic tests of 1946-58.

"The team thinks that Rongelap Atoll is potentially seeding Bikini's recovery because it is the second-largest atoll in the world with a huge amount of coral reef diversity and biomass and lies upstream from Bikini," said Ms Richards, from the government-backed Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies.

While much marine life had been re-established, the researchers found that at least 28 species of coral previously found in the area had become locally extinct.

The team was commissioned by the Marshall Islands government to investigate Bikini for the first time since the tests, partly to see if a small diving industry could safely be expanded.

The waters around Bikini are littered with wrecks of World War Two decommissioned ships sunk during the tests, including the aircraft carrier USS Saratoga and the former Japanese flagship HIJMS Nagato, from which Admiral Yamoto gave the order to attack Pearl Harbour.

Ms Richards said the ability of Bikini's corals to bounce back from "a single huge destructive event" was proof of their resilience.

That did not mean, however, that the threat to coral reefs around the world from climate change had been overstated.

I think the rest is climate change hype.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ear...ife-flourishes-at-Bikini-Atoll-test-site.html
... of all the atolls to "self wreck" on! :D

:surrender:
 

Zed

Size doesn't count!
Midas Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
11,495
Likes
8,869
Location
Springfield
#11
I'd settle for either but I'm taking dibs on Maryann if it's going to be the latter. Might be best to let Professur decide since he has experience. He has to come along anyway because he might have some magical spores.
Good taste young man, I like red heads but...
 

Garyw

The Military gave me Defoliant Exposure
Silver Miner
Joined
Mar 16, 2011
Messages
1,255
Likes
992
Location
State of Jefferson
#13
Johnston Atoll was used by the US Government during the Viet Nam War to store Thousands of rusty barrels of Agent Orange and other defoliants. I was stationed in Okinawa in 1970 where many of these barrels came from. (Thanks US Government for shortening my life by giving me Cancer.) Now the island has been cleaned and all defoliants supposedly has been burned aboard ships and the US Dept of Fish and Wildlife is in charge of the island and claims it has been cleaned up. It is in the Martial Island chain about 400 miles from Hawaii.

HERE IS PROOF
what are you going to do with the barrels of agent orange and other dioxins stacked in 50 gallon drums on Johnston Atoll since the 1970's?

Greetings Mr. Wolfer
Thank you for your interest in the Johnston Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. The barrels of agent orange and other dioxins were burned on the waste incinerator ship Volcanus many years ago. Dioxins that leaked out of the barrels while they were still stored on Johnston Island were treated by thermal desorption, a process that removes organic contaminants from soil, sludge or sediment with extreme heat. I have attached a link to an EPA information page on the process.
https://clu-in.org/download/Citizens/a_citizens_guide_to_thermal_desorption.pdf
The island and surrounding seas are once again being managed as a wildlife refuge, in consultation and cooperation with the US Air Force and NOAA.

https://www.fws.gov/refuge/johnston_atoll/
 
Last edited:

the_shootist

The war is here on our doorstep!
Midas Member
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
May 31, 2015
Messages
19,816
Likes
20,876
Location
Somewhere out there!
#14
By Nick Squires in Sydney

6:45PM BST 15 Apr 2008


It was blasted by the largest nuclear weapon ever detonated by the United States but half a century on, Bikini Atoll supports a stunning array of tropical coral, scientists have found.

In 1954 the South Pacific atoll was rocked by a 15 megatonne hydrogen bomb 1,000 times more powerful than the explosives dropped on Hiroshima.

The explosion shook islands more than 100 miles away, generated a wave of heat measuring 99,000ºF and spread mist-like radioactive fallout as far as Japan and Australia.

But, much to the surprise of a team of research divers who explored the area, the mile-wide crater left by the detonation has made a remarkable recovery and is now home to a thriving underwater ecosystem.

Bravo crater was ground zero for the test of the thermonuclear warhead on Bikini Atoll, in the remote Marshall Islands.

"I didn't know what to expect, some kind of moonscape perhaps. But it was incredible," Zoe Richards, from James Cook University in Australia, said. "We saw … plenty of fish, corals and action going on, some really striking individual colonies."

The scientists - from Australia, the US, Germany, Italy and the Marshall Islands - found corals up to 24 ft high with 10 inch thick trunks.

While surrounding islands remain contaminated and unfit for human habitation, healthy marine species were probably propelled by strong winds and currents from nearby Rongelap Atoll, which was not bombed in the atomic tests of 1946-58.

"The team thinks that Rongelap Atoll is potentially seeding Bikini's recovery because it is the second-largest atoll in the world with a huge amount of coral reef diversity and biomass and lies upstream from Bikini," said Ms Richards, from the government-backed Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies.

While much marine life had been re-established, the researchers found that at least 28 species of coral previously found in the area had become locally extinct.

The team was commissioned by the Marshall Islands government to investigate Bikini for the first time since the tests, partly to see if a small diving industry could safely be expanded.

The waters around Bikini are littered with wrecks of World War Two decommissioned ships sunk during the tests, including the aircraft carrier USS Saratoga and the former Japanese flagship HIJMS Nagato, from which Admiral Yamoto gave the order to attack Pearl Harbour.

Ms Richards said the ability of Bikini's corals to bounce back from "a single huge destructive event" was proof of their resilience.

That did not mean, however, that the threat to coral reefs around the world from climate change had been overstated.

I think the rest is climate change hype.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ear...ife-flourishes-at-Bikini-Atoll-test-site.html
But really, it's all about climate change!!!
That did not mean, however, that the threat to coral reefs around the world from climate change had been overstated.
 

mayhem

Другая перспектива
Silver Miner
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
3,769
Likes
5,230
#15
If I recall Ginger was high maintenance, while Maryann was a practical gal. Redheads are great one nighters, but usually more than I can handle long term.
 

Flight2gold

Silver Member
Silver Miner
Site Supporter ++
Joined
May 12, 2010
Messages
1,486
Likes
1,834
Location
Florida
#16
Typhoon's.
Hang on and ride it out.