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Venezuela is lurching closer and closer to chaos

Scorpio

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#1
Venezuela is lurching closer and closer to chaos




People demonstrate against the government of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro. (Federico Parra/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images)
By Editorial Board December 26 at 6:49 PM


VENEZUELA, WHICH was once Latin America’s richest country, has become an unwilling test site for how much economic and social stress a modern nation can tolerate before it descends into pure anarchy. This month its 31 million people lurched a big step closer to that breaking point, thanks to another senseless decree by its autocratic populist government.

For years Venezuelans have struggled with mounting shortages of food, medicine and other consumer goods, as well as triple-digit inflation that has rendered the national currency, the bolivar, worthless. By this month the 100-bolivar bill, the largest note in circulation, was worth only 2 cents, forcing people to carry piles of them in order to make the most rudimentary purchases. Then came this coup: On Dec. 11, President Nicolás Maduro, an economically illiterate former bus driver, announced that all 6 billion 100-bolivar notes would cease to be legal tender in just 72 hours. He also closed Venezuela’s borders with Colombia and Brazil, on the theory that traders were hoarding currency in those countries.

Almost overnight, millions of Venezuelans — about 40 percent of whom do not have bank accounts in which the currency could be deposited — lost the ability to purchase even those goods still available on the market. The result was predictable: looting and riots in at least eight cities. In the eastern town of Ciudad Bolivar, with a population of some 400,000, hundreds of stores were looted and at least three people were killed in three days of mayhem.

Mr. Maduro was forced to modify his fiat, extending the currency’s validity to Jan. 2 and reopening the borders. The government says it will distribute new bills in larger denominations. Meanwhile, the president is doing his best to blame the United States for the fiasco, claiming that it had somehow been orchestrated by President Obama .

Venezuelans no longer believe such nonsense. A survey released this month by pollster Alfredo Keller showed that only 1 percent said the United States was to blame for the country’s crisis, while 76 percent blamed Mr. Maduro and the regime founded by Hugo Chávez. Three-quarters said they believed children were dying because of a lack of food and medicine, and 98 percent said they had been unable to find essential products. Only 19 percent said they still supported the regime.

That the Maduro government somehow staggers on is due to its refusal to allow a constitutionally permitted presidential recall referendum ; a divided opposition; a military deeply compromised by corruption, including drug trafficking; and the diversion of international pressure — including from the United States — into feckless and futile attempts to promote negotiations between the government and the opposition. Instead of an election-driven political transition or a people-powered revolution, Venezuela is undergoing a comprehensive breakdown of order unlike anything Latin America has seen in decades. That its hemispheric neighbors witness this implosion without using the means they have to bring meaningful pressure to bear on the government renders the failure all the more profound.



https://www.washingtonpost.com/opin...c064d32a4bf_story.html?utm_term=.09a414ccb78e
 

REO 54

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#3
Coming closer and closer.....
 

Hystckndle

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#4
Coffee shop -new citizen- managers parents live there as well as many family members. Not a good situation.
Send dollars and peeps stake you out. But not so much is available to trde dollars for anyways. We have been taking him some foodstuff as he sends a freight box every few weeks.
Its truly crazy and headed south. Not good.
 

nickndfl

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#5
I figure the military will step in sooner rather than later. When they see what Trump is doing they are going to give Maduro a fair trial and then execute him.
 

Ensoniq

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#6
I can't imagine how Muduro is still in power

Because you can't really rise up after you've starved to death
 

Usury

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#7
Wait....19% still support the regime???!!! WTF!!!????
 

REO 54

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#9
Coming closer and closer.....

Looting in Mexico spiraling out of control over 20% gas hike; 430 arrested:


Residents pilfer gasoline and diesel from a gas station in Allende, Mexico, Jan. 3, 2017. (AP)

Angry over a sharp gasoline price hike that took effect on New Year’s Day, hundreds of Mexicans continue to block highways, burn tires and seize gas stations across the country.


As of Thursday morning, 250 stores had been looted and 170 were closed or blockaded in all of Mexico, according to the National Association of Self-Service and Department Stores.

At least 430 protesters were detained on charges of vandalism, including four police officers according to El Universal.

In the Gulf coast city of Veracruz, store guards were overrun Wednesday by crowds who carried off clothing, food, washing machines, televisions, DVD players and refrigerators.

The increases of up to 20 percent is part of the government’s efforts to deregulate prices for gasoline and diesel, which it says represented subsidies that unduly benefited wealthier Mexicans.

In a TV address, President Enrique Pena Nieto defended the unpopular measure that resulted and said he would try to help groups hit hard by the increases -- an apparent reference to bus, truck and taxi drivers.

"I understand the anger and irritation felt by the general public," Pena Nieto said, saying that "this is an action that nobody would want to take."

"If this decision had not been taken, the effects and consequences would have been far more painful," he added.

The change boosted the average price for a liter of premium gasoline to 17.79 pesos (about 90 cents). That makes 4 liters, or about a gallon, equal to nearly as much as Mexico's just raised minimum wage for a day's work — 80 pesos (about $4).

AP and EFE contributed to this report.

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/0...aling-out-control-over-20-gas-price-hike.html
 

tom baxter

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#10
In the Gulf coast city of Veracruz, store guards were overrun Wednesday by crowds who carried off clothing, food, washing machines, televisions, DVD players and refrigerators.

And herein lies the problem. For thousands of years you had the wealthy rulers and their wealthy friends at the top, a small professional class, shopkeepers artisans etc in the middle, and then the swarming masses of poor at the bottom. Along comes oil and coal and replaces the need for so much cheap labor and the the poor are elevated to a level where a TV, DVD, washing machine and fridge are all normal expectations. 100 years passes, oil production peaks and no more cheap subsidies for the millions of poor.

They have only one future now, the long decent back into the poverty of their ancestors. And the same applies to our western nations because technology had nothing to do with our prosperity, neither did unions, not democratic governments. All of these institutions that people consider as the reasons for our improved lifestyles were just parasites sucking on the teat of abundant free energy. You want to be well off? Then you need slaves. Either slaves in your factory, in your cotton field, or gushing out of an oil well.
 
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#12
You want to be well off? Then you need slaves. ...
Such can become interesting if one considers " Capital Seeking Advantage "
being nothing other than " something for nothing " in the form of " Free Energy "

A factory worker in North America may get upwards of $30 per hour
so the Capitalist moves the factory to some alternate venue where
a factory worker may get $2 per hour ... yielding a nominal Free Energy of $28 per hour

One may argue about " Capital Seeking Advantage " and it boils down to
" Capital Seeking something for nothing " in the final rendering.

The above can imply Capitalism is Usury like

a bit of a Sticky Wicket I'd say
 

GOLDZILLA

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#14
Access to capital can also be harmful if the person/corp takes on more debt than they can ever pay off.
 
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#15
' access to capital ' is a extreme advantage to some over others
well I have to ask what does some vs others mean in regard to ' access to capital ' ?

I recall the first time I borrowed money from a bank
I went into bank
said I want to borrow $ xyz for 2 weeks
banker said NO it was not Worth his Time
So I said fine
Cash in THIS CD

Banker then " Lent " to me $ xyz for 2 weeks
I recall that loan cost me $ 1.44 in interest charge

:oriental:
 

REO 54

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#16
Venezuelans killing flamingos and anteaters to stave off hunger amid mounting food crisis:


(Reuters)

Venezuela’s food crisis has gotten so bad that people are apparently killing pink flamingos and other protected animals in order to stave off hunger.


While flamingo hunting is both illegal and uncommon in the South American nation, investigators from Zulia University in the northwestern Venezuelan city of Maracaibo have noted at least 20 cases of bird carcasses being discovered with their breasts and torsos removed.

And flamingos aren’t the only unusual animal to become a victim of Venezuela’s worsening food crisis. Remains of everything from dogs and cats to donkeys and even giant anteaters have been found in garbage bags at city dumps around the country.

“Sometimes we only find the animal’s heads, guts and legs. We used to see this very little in the past, but this practice is now out of control and on the rise,” Robert Linares, a Maracaibo waste disposal worker, told the Miami Herald. Linares added he recently found on the street the remains of a dog that had been skinned and dismembered.

More on this...
The once-wealthy oil producing nation has fallen on hard times since Nicolás Maduro took power following the death of socialist leader Hugo Chávez in 2013. A drop in global oil prices has crippled the country’s economy and Venezuela has been plagued with the worst inflation rate in the world, close to 700 per cent last year, according to International Monetary Fund.

The collapse of the country’s economy has made it difficult to import basic goods such as food and medicine, created acute shortages and stirred deep-seated anger toward Maduro. A recent study conducted by three universities found that in 2015 87 percent of Venezuelans didn’t have enough money to buy sufficient food for their families.

The lack of food has even earned its own nickname: “The Maduro Diet.”

“We find these killings grotesque, but how can we be critical of someone who hunts a pigeon, a dog, a cat or any animal because he or she is hungry?” Doris Rubio, CEO of the Venezuela-based Animal Protection Association, said to the Herald. “People used to hunt lizards for sport. Now they do it out of necessity.”

Expand / Contract

A baby giant anteater hides beneath its mother's tail in their enclosure. (Reuters)

Researchers in Venezuela warn that eating animals that are not raised for the purpose of consumption – whether that be a wild flamingo or a stray dog – is extremely dangerous to people’s health as they could possibly host bacteria and viruses that could be deadly.

“In France, they eat horses and in China they eat dogs and cats, but after being raised according to sanitary programs," Hugo Hernández, a veterinary sciences professor in University of Zulia, said. "In our country, these animals are being hunted in the wild or in the streets and cannot be consumed by humans."

In Venezuela, two pounds of sugar or corn flour cost about 7,800 bolivares, or $2 dollars, on the black market, while two pounds of good meat goes for about 10,000 bolivares. Adding these three items together results in a cost that is around half of the country’s official monthly minimum wage of 40,000 bolivares, or $11 dollars.

Besides killing “vulnerable” animals, many Venezuelans have taken to scavenging for discarded items of food to supplement their diet – a move that had previously only been done by the country’s homeless and mentally ill population.

Adding to the overall misery is a drastic rise in violent crime, especially in the capital city of Caracas, rolling blackouts and widespread and often times bloody protests against the government. There have been casualties and deaths on both sides of the protests and accusations from the international community of human rights abuses and political oppression.

“The pressure that Venezuelans face every day is tremendous because of all the uncertainty,” Sonia Schott, the former Washington, D.C., correspondent for Venezuelan news network Globovisión, told Fox News. “Nobody knows what will happen the next day.”


http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/0...ave-off-hunger-amid-mounting-food-crisis.html
 

dacrunch

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#17
When you realize that there are less than 30 million Venezuelans, the "system" really has to be totally inept, considering all the material resources, and croplands that can produce year-round...
 

Someone_else

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#18
Yes, it appears that they have read Atlas Shrugged, and are determined to re-enact its plot to the letter.
 

REO 54

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#19
Venezuelans lead in US asylum requests as crisis deepens:

New data shows Venezuelans are leading asylum requests to the United States for the first time, as the middle class in the country are fleeing the crashing, oil-dependent economy.


The U.S. government's Citizenship and Immigration Services reported that 18,155 Venezuelans submitted asylum requests last year, a 150 percent increase over 2015 and six times the level seen in 2014.

Data showed China in second place, with 17,745 requests coming from the country’s citizens.

In 2014 a large number of Venezuelans sought asylum following months of protests seeking to oust President Nicolas Maduro.

A large surge in applicants took place since late 2015 after the opposition took control of congress in a landslide election, giving hope to many that it could disrupt 17 years of socialist rule. Instead of reaching out to his opponents, Maduro retrenched and Venezuelans began to uproot as triple-digit inflation pulverized salaries and widespread food and medicine shortages made life unbearable for many.

A large number of the asylum seekers are middle-class Venezuelans who don’t qualify for refugee status reserved for those seeking to escape political persecution, according to Julio Henriquez, director of the Boston-based nonprofit Refugee Freedom Program.

"The pace at which requests are increasing is alarming," said Henriquez, whose group obtained the still-unpublished data in a Feb. 8 meeting between U.S. officials and immigration lawyers. "It's not just worrisome that so many people are escaping the terrible situation in Venezuela but also that the practice of sending asylum-seekers with poor advice and false proof is proliferating."

According to the Department of Homeland Security’s estimate of visa overstays, Venezuela became one of the top 10 countries whose citizens overstayed their U.S. visas during the fiscal year in 2015.

Venezuelans seeking U.S. asylum represent a small share of the overall Venezuelan immigrant population, some of whom have made their home in the U.S. for decades.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.


http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/0...-in-us-asylum-requests-as-crisis-deepens.html


 

searcher

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#20
US imposes sanctions on Venezuela's vice president because of his 'major role in international drug trafficking'
  • Trump blacklisted Venezuela's Vice President Tareck El Aissami and an associate
  • The US Department of Treasury said it designated El Aissami for sanctions under the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act
  • His associate, Samark Lopez Bello, was targeted for providing material assistance
  • Venezuela is suffering from a dire humanitarian situation with a lack of food for the populace, which the US says some high officials are profiting from


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4221470/U-S-targets-Venezuela-vice-president-sanctions-sources.html#ixzz4YemtdkW1
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