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What’s Cracking In The Garden 2019

spinalcracker

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Nope.

Ah. Mormons.
They have their Book of Morons , Pearl of Great Farce , and the Doctored Up Covenants.

But that’s another Theead for another day....

And holy underwear.

Meanwhile in the garden of eden , or inna gadda da vida baby..

This girl ain’t gonna make it in these parts. She needs to flower a long time and harvested around Turkey Day...

Big TrainWreck from Woodhorse Seeds...

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pitw

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I bought and planted a batch of different seeds this spring. Them pricks must all have come from someplace with a 1 year growing cycle as they never flowered yet. I got enough for me from my own supply but a buddy has the best crop we've see in 3 years. From seed outside and it's from my seed.
 

Unca Walt

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This girl ain’t gonna make it in these parts. She needs to flower a long time and harvested around Turkey Day...

Big TrainWreck from Woodhorse Seeds...
Aw geez. You ain't gonna let that gorgeous thing:weed:DIE... are ya? Could you put a radiant heater on it for cold days? Move it into the kitchen? cry::oops:
 

newmisty

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It looks like a planet to me...I could not see it with my naked eye but it showed up in the photo...

Maybe just a sun spot on lens.
Swamp gas!
 

newmisty

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Jarrod32

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Update...we moved into a new place in mid July. Moving is always a bit hectic, and we weren't able to get a garden in. All the stuff at the old place flooded...the strawberry patch, the raspberries and blackberries, rhubard, etc. But the new place has a lot of space for a garden (just wait til next year), so we have that to look forward to. What the new place does have is a mature apple tree, peach tree, and pear tree. Peach tree didn't produce much this year, but the apple tree and pear tree are kicking out some fruit. So...fired up the canning equipment today, and lo and behold if what didn't appear were nine quarts of pie filling (peach and apple).

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Oh...and there was one for the oven.

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Still trying to figure out what to do with all the #%@#%(& pears.
 

Pyramid

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Green Beans, Squash, Eggplant and Tomatoes doing well. Peppers struggling and fall crops not looking good...too much recent rain and not enough sun I surmise. A measly couple of taters from a planter, they apparently didn't do well either when the chipmunks/squirrels weren't digging them up, but a few more pots to harvest.


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Pulled the onions, ~100 in all. They didn't grow very well either. Most are baseball size at best, many are twice the size of golf balls...pretty pathetic. Should keep us supplied until next year's harvest, so not all is lost. They evidently need more sun and/or drier soil conditions than we had this season...ton of rainfall here.

Growing season is pretty short here and we are all at the whims of Mother Nature. It's been a pretty good season overall, and we keep learning, that's arguably most important. Some crops will do well, others will not depending on weather. Good luck out there folks.
 

newmisty

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newmisty

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View attachment 141157
Green Beans, Squash, Eggplant and Tomatoes doing well. Peppers struggling and fall crops not looking good...too much recent rain and not enough sun I surmise. A measly couple of taters from a planter, they apparently didn't do well either when the chipmunks/squirrels weren't digging them up, but a few more pots to harvest.


View attachment 141158 Pulled the onions, ~100 in all. They didn't grow very well either. Most are baseball size at best, many are twice the size of golf balls...pretty pathetic. Should keep us supplied until next year's harvest, so not all is lost. They evidently need more sun and/or drier soil conditions than we had this season...ton of rainfall here.

Growing season is pretty short here and we are all at the whims of Mother Nature. It's been a pretty good season overall, and we keep learning, that's arguably most important. Some crops will do well, others will not depending on weather. Good luck out there folks.
Sounds like you did great with what you had. Thanks for sharing.
 

spinalcracker

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Pyramid , that photo could be used for the cover of a seed catalog...purdy!..

Harvest is about 90% in with just some indeterminate tomatoes and Swiss chard still cranking it out...

Cleaning up dead corn and will be tilling ground to prep for fall garlic planting = fecking work.

Medicine plants are bulking up and hopefully the frost will stay away until October 15....



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Unca Walt

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Un-fargin-believable. Magnificent. Beautiful.

One of the buds**** looks like it just caught and swallowed a bird

****"buds" is now a misnomer. BUDS!! is closer...


Trippy tune:

"If you're happy and you know it...

It's your weed!"
 

newmisty

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Had a little rain the other day but been using my catch basin to supplement. Here's my harvest from today. These Hillbilly Tom's are excellent. Mixed some diced 50/50 with chicken salad wrap for a winner and they turn salad into a dessert. The flavor of the Japs is amazing; a zingy zangy citrus. Been eating the sweet lunch box cuties as a snack and cut up in eggs and salads. The Cayennes I'm basically putting in whatever I'm eating and they compliment perfectly. Hot but not overbearing. The Cherry's are a surprise plant and thankfully sweet and prolific.
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newmisty

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Pyramid , that photo could be used for the cover of a seed catalog...purdy!..

Harvest is about 90% in with just some indeterminate tomatoes and Swiss chard still cranking it out...

Cleaning up dead corn and will be tilling ground to prep for fall garlic planting = fecking work.

Medicine plants are bulking up and hopefully the frost will stay away until October 15....



View attachment 141167 View attachment 141168 View attachment 141169 View attachment 141170 View attachment 141171 View attachment 141172 View attachment 141173
Those night shots make them look like creepy aliens!
 

newmisty

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newmisty

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So far this is the only tomato with this problem. Anyone know what it is or what causes it?
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newmisty

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Unca Walt

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It's an Alien's head. You are holding him sideways by the ear, and he is PISSED OFF.
 

newmisty

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Are pine needles too acidic to toss in an end of season garden?
 

newmisty

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It's an Alien's head. You are holding him sideways by the ear, and he is PISSED OFF.
Lol, you just reminded me that was my first experience with brain fruit around here. We were at the park and I came across what look like a rotting monkey brain. Turns out it's just one of these softball-sized fruits.
 

newmisty

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Dood, thats a hedge apple.
Roger. Sure looks nasty rotting in the grass!
Maclura pomifera, commonly known as the Osage orange, hedge, or hedge apple tree is a small deciduous tree or large shrub, typically growing to 8 to 15 metres tall. The distinctive fruit, from a multiple fruit family, is roughly spherical, bumpy, 8 to 15 centimetres in diameter, and turns bright yellow-green in the fall. The fruits secrete a sticky white latex when cut or damaged. Despite the name "Osage orange", it is only distantly related to the orange, but rather is a member of the mulberry family, Moraceae. Due to its latex secretions and woody pulp, the fruit is typically not eaten by humans and rarely by foraging animals, giving it distinction as an anachronistic "ghost of evolution
 

michael59

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Roger. Sure looks nasty rotting in the grass!
Maclura pomifera, commonly known as the Osage orange, hedge, or hedge apple tree is a small deciduous tree or large shrub, typically growing to 8 to 15 metres tall. The distinctive fruit, from a multiple fruit family, is roughly spherical, bumpy, 8 to 15 centimetres in diameter, and turns bright yellow-green in the fall. The fruits secrete a sticky white latex when cut or damaged. Despite the name "Osage orange", it is only distantly related to the orange, but rather is a member of the mulberry family, Moraceae. Due to its latex secretions and woody pulp, the fruit is typically not eaten by humans and rarely by foraging animals, giving it distinction as an anachronistic "ghost of evolution
that shit is sik. wht is 8 to 15? is that like yards or something?

So there are like 20 or something trees of this along the road way above the poles which are bout 35 to 40 foot. I got out one winter thinking these were chestnuts an NO. The horse spit them out. Nasty stuff.

edited to add: the horsiey hates me now and that was two years ago.
 

newmisty

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It's an Alien's head. You are holding him sideways by the ear, and he is PISSED OFF.
Damn Unca I think you're right!

I apologized and I think he's just thriving off the attention!

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newmisty

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Unca Walt

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Some one said pictures or it din't happen. Well here is the dismal garden failure of the year:
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somewhere in all them wild carrots is 6 halopenyo plants
Sure you ain't really down here in the jungle with Unca? That sure looks just like my garden useta. Now its a rifle range.
 

newmisty

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spinalcracker

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Lol, you just reminded me that was my first experience with brain fruit around here. We were at the park and I came across what look like a rotting monkey brain. Turns out it's just one of these softball-sized fruits.

We called those Osage oranges and we called the tree a Bodark tree... very hard wood , I believe it’s harder than oak...

We made some wood floats and a darby or two when I was finishing concrete..

They were as hard as a mag float...

The darby wasn’t very long cause it’s difficult to find a piece of Bodark that’s very straight , a two foot piece was a real find..
 

michael59

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We called those Osage oranges and we called the tree a Bodark tree... very hard wood , I believe it’s harder than oak...

We made some wood floats and a darby or two when I was finishing concrete..

They were as hard as a mag float...

The darby wasn’t very long cause it’s difficult to find a piece of Bodark that’s very straight , a two foot piece was a real find..
Evidently they grow different here in the Ore-e-gone. Will post pictures as soon as can or they are not growing here.
 

spinalcracker

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The trees acquired the name bois d'arc, or "bow-wood",[3] from early French settlers who observed the wood being used for war clubs and bow-making by Native Americans.

[10] Meriwether Lewis was told that the people of the Osage Nation, "So much … esteem the wood of this tree for the purpose of making their bows, that they travel many hundreds of miles in quest of it."

[12] The trees are also known as "bodark" or "bodarc" trees, most likely originating from a corruption of "bois d'arc."[3] The Comanches also used this wood for their bows.

[13] It was popular with them because it was strong, flexible and durable,[3] and was common along river bottoms of the Comanchería. Some historians believe that the high value this wood had to Native Americans throughout North America for the making of bows, along with its small natural range, contributed to the great wealth of the Spiroan Mississippian culture that controlled all the land in which these trees grew.[14]


These trees are all over Kansas , the farmers planted rows and rows and rows...

We would hunt pheasant along those rows , a shooter on each side...


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spinalcracker

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I am excited for Amber!...


Meet Amber Strohauer of Strohauer Farms, Inc.. She’s a 4th generation farmer and is excited to keep her family farming legacy going. Her family started farming potatoes here in Colorado in 1901 and now grows everything from finger potatoes to shallots. Though this #WomanInAg farms in La Salle, she still considers herself a “City Girl” (Denver to be exact!!).



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