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TAEZZAR

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Nice !!!!
 

newmisty

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So one of the issues that needs to be addressed at this house is......the crawl space door. Lol

It's a friggin pieces of Durarock....as in tile backer... In other words of flimsy piece of crap.

IMG_20200730_161734129.jpg
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when I unlatched the lock to open the door, half of the lock fell off and started dangling. And whenn I say flimsy, I'm talking about macaroni noodle flimsy.
 

newmisty

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I miss working with cedar shingles. Since moving from Maine I haven't touched them. But I've installed an awful lot with them up there including using this method. It's fun and therapeutic.


Weaving Shingle Corners, With Flare
By Emanuel Silva
DOWNLOAD THE PDF VERSION OF THIS ARTICLE. (2.73 MB)

In the area where I work, many of the existing homes have cedar shingle siding. Currently costing more than $225 per box, the prestained No. 1 grade R&R (rebutted and rejointed) red-cedar shingles that I used on this project are a premium siding material, so they’re not as commonly used in new construction as they once were. But I renovate and remodel a lot of existing housing stock and often have to match the home’s siding when modifying a wall for a new door or window, or when building a new porch, deck, or addition. It makes sense to use installation details that ensure that this premium building material lasts as long as possible.

In this article, I’ll focus on the corners. Some shingle-sided homes have corner boards, but another traditional option—especially here in New England—is to wrap the shingles around both the outside and inside corners. In addition, the old homes in our area often have siding that is flared out over the foundation at the base of the wall, instead of terminating at a water table or remaining in the same plane as the wall. This complicates shingle installation a little bit, especially at the woven corners, but it looks great and is actually a practical detail for homes with irregular fieldstone foundation walls. With a careful approach and a few special tools, it’s not difficult to install flared, woven cedar-shingle corners.

Underlayment
I’ve dug into plenty of walls that lacked any 15‑lb. felt paper (the old-school WRB) or building paper between the shingles and the sheathing, without finding any significant water damage. That’s because shingles with 5 inches or so of exposure provide triple coverage, an effective way to shed water. But I always install building paper over the sheathing as required by code, first covering any inside or outside corners with peel-and-stick flashing membrane.
After prepping the inside and outside corners with an additional layer of peel-and-stick membrane, the author staples up Cedar Breather to provide a space for airflow between the shingles and the WRB.
On the corner shown here, I installed 12-inch-wide Vycor Plus vertically, overlapping the inside and outside corners by 9 inches on one side and 3 inches on the other. Then I ran a full width of Vycor up the wall at the corners to cover the 3-inch legs. On a larger wall section, I would detail the corners and then cover the rest of wall with Blueskin SAF housewrap.

Next, I installed Cedar Breather, a nylon matrix that creates a gap between the back of the shingles and the WRB. This rainscreen detail allows the shingles to quickly dry out from both the inside and outside, which helps to prevent them from curling and cracking.

Adding the Flare
As far as I know, there is no uniform angle for the flared shingle detail at the base of the wall on old homes, so there was a bit of trial-and-error in my method. I started by ripping a couple of pieces of 1-by PVC trim to make a pair of upper and lower furring strips—one measuring 1 inch wide and one measuring 2 inches wide—to kick out the shingles. Then I mocked up the flare detail on my workbench to find the proper bevel angle for the furring strips.
A mock up of the flare detail helped the author determine the 15-degree bevel angle on the PVC furring strips.

When a shingle is pressed against the furring strips to make the flare, the back of the shingle contacts only the top edge of the furring strip. So after a couple of trial cuts, I figured out that a 15-degree bevel on the edge of each furring strip provided the proper angle for full contact.

After ripping the upper and lower furring strips and cutting them to length, I assembled them as single units on my workbench, rather than installing them one piece at a time on the wall. This made it easier to square up the assemblies, level them, and shim them as needed as I screwed them to the wall.
The author glued and screwed the furring strips together into an assembly.
This made it easier to square the furring strips up and keep them level during installation.

There are a couple of reasons why I made the furring strips from PVC rather than wood trim. For one thing, PVC won’t rot; but even more importantly, it holds the ring-shank siding nails that I use to install the shingles tenaciously, much more so than eastern white pine does. This is especially important with flared shingles, which are under some tension that tends to make the nails want to withdraw from the substrate.

Starter Course
I always begin with an inside corner and work from the inside out, as it is much easier to run an outside shingle long and trim it to fit than it is to cut an inside shingle to the exact size needed. Before installing any shingles, though, I scribed a pair of lines across the butt end of each one to mark the 5-inch exposure line, and to mark the 5 3/8-inch fastener location above the butt. Then I tacked the first (right-hand) shingle in place so I could use it to scribe the flare on the adjacent (left-hand) shingle with a compass.
The author trims enough of the butt of the first inside corner shingle so that the left edge is tight to the wall.
After the first shingle is tacked in place, it is used to help scribe the curve on the opposing shingle.
A compass is used to scribe the flare on the opposing shingle.

Until recently, I would have used a jigsaw to cut the shingle just off the scribe mark. But lately, I’ve been using a Makita 12-volt Max CXT 3 3/8-inch cordless circular saw for trim cuts in 1-by stock, including curves like this, because it’s faster and makes a smoother cut. Then I pared the cut back to the scribe line with a Stanley Surform 21-115 shaver, a versatile and virtually indestructible tool that belongs in every toolbelt. Unlike a block plane, this tool can also be used to carve out concave curves, an ability that’s needed for the shingles on the outside corner.
Then he cuts the shingle to the scribe line with a small cordless circular saw, which has a 3 3/8-inch-diameter blade that allows him to follow the curve.
To clean up the cut, the author uses a Stanley Surform shaver, which - unlike a block plane - will work on both concave and convex surfaces.

To roughly scribe the back of the first outside-corner shingle, I used a flexible 3/8-inch-by-3/4-inch batten ripped from PVC stock. After cutting and shaving that shingle to the scribe line and tacking it in place, I pressed the adjacent shingle into position against the furring strips and scribed the back of that one. After cutting and trimming this second outside-corner shingle to the line, I nailed it to the furring strips. Then I cleaned up the corner where the two shingles overlapped, using the Surform.
On the outside corner, a flexible batten is used to scribe the back of the first starter shingle, which is pressed in place against the furring strips.
After the first shingle is trimmed to the scribe line and tacked in place, it is used as a guide to scribe the back of the opposing corner shingle.
After installing the remaining outside corner shingle in the starter course, the author uses his Surform tool to smooth the joint.

Nailing
There’s nothing fast about weaving shingle corners, including the nailing. For one thing, I carefully hand-nailed these shingles to the wall. To prevent cracks and splits, I drilled holes for all of the 2-inch stainless steel ring-shank fasteners, using the 5 3/8-inch scribe line to accurately place the holes in the right location, 3/8 inch above the exposure line and at least 3/8 inch away from the edge of the shingle.

On the flared portion, I drove the nails in as close to simultaneously as possible rather than nailing off one side at a time, tapping in one nail and then the other until they both were driven home. Otherwise, the shingles would have split. As I move up the wall and the shingles flatten out, predrilling isn’t as critical, but I still usually hand-nail the shingles rather than fire up a siding nailer. As I said, there’s no quick way to install shingle siding.

After the starter course was nailed off, I duplicated the scribing procedure with the first course of shingles, starting from the inside corner again but instead scribing the shingle on the opposing (right-hand) corner. This created a water-shedding overlap at the inside corner.




As I installed the field shingles, I overlapped each joint on the starter course by at least 1 1/2 inches. At the outside corner, I again reversed the scribing sequence so that the woven shingles would properly overlap the starter-course shingles.

I continued the same sequence as I installed each course of shingles, working from the inside corner out and using a spirit level to keep the courses on track. Occasionally, I nailed together a corner shingle joint that had opened up, carefully drilling a small pilot hole through the face of the outer shingle into the edge of the opposing shingle to keep the nail on track and keep it from splitting either shingle. But in general, shingles with only a 5-inch exposure lay flat on the wall, and this step isn’t as necessary as it is with shingles that have a wider exposure.

After I finished weaving the corner, I came back and lightly cleaned up the shaved joints with 120-grit sandpaper as needed, then touched everything up with matching stain.
Photos by Carter Silva

https://www.jlconline.com/how-to/ex...cle&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=JLC_080220&
 
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TAEZZAR

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.the crawl space door. Lol
That is a laugh, both in the quality of the previous work & what little time & effort it will take, compared to that beautiful front door !:2 thumbs up:
 

newmisty

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That is a laugh, both in the quality of the previous work & what little time & effort it will take, compared to that beautiful front door !:2 thumbs up:
By the way this is a $700, 000 house. There is so much sloppy stuff going on it makes my head spin.
 

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Thanks Misty, really like the looks of shakes - never did have the opportunity to work with them.

Ha! I been to Maine a couple times, saw houses with shake siding, mostly they seemed to work better over time on the sides then they did on the roof.

When up there in Maine land, I passed by lumber yards and saw pallets of those shakes. Told the wife, wish I had a way to bring some home.
 

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Pics from the last shingle job I did before moving to Ar. I enjoy siding a lot. Once you get a handle on a few tips and tricks it's a cakewalk. For laying the courses up I was taught a ghetto method of affixing a couple strips of aluminum flashing, about 3" wide by about 10" long to the back of a thin straight 1"x 4" or roughly equivalent. Then you put the top of the board where the bottom of your course line goes and use a hammer tacker(stapler) to tack in the flashing which holds up your board. Now you can grab a pile of shingles and fill your board and nail em on. When your done you take your hammer and bang down on the board which rips the flashing through your staples and then pulls out from under the shingles. In a fast setting your heloper will be feeding you shingles as you need to select them to keep your joints properly staggered. It also feels like playing real life donkey kong sometimes too with all the scaffolding. :)
Soule (6).JPG


Soule (7).JPG


Soule (5).JPG


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Soule (2).JPG
 
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newmisty

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I ended up doing the whole house. My only disappointment was seeing the nice gray color(pre-primed resquared, rebutted shingles) get painted an obnoxious yellow!

The hardest part is getting the shingle courses to not only meet up at the corners, but also fall appropriately at the doors and windows. That can take a fair amount of figuring and cheating. Cheating is necessary on these old homes as nothing is level or plumb,. So you cheat course widths in both directions such that the eye doesn't pick it up. Just takes some experience.

The yellow shingles in the first pic are the old ones.

Soule (15).JPG


Soule (12).JPG


Soule.JPG


Soule Final (5).JPG


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newmisty

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Spent twice as much time on the door as I anticipated. It was a freaking nightmare. I went to take off the deadbolt and it took a fraction of the doors paint with it.

So I put a second coat if putty and caulk, did a spray primer the help the paint and micro fill some voids. It could really use a another round of caulk but the client dumped a bunch of decisions on to the realtor and I last minute before the photographer came to shoot so I had a bunch of other repairs and work to do.

I wasn't sure how I was going to deal with the window on the door so I just cut it in free hand with a 3" angle brush. I've been impressing myself lately with my brush skills. I created a lot of slick techniques over the years. Also I used to mini roller to put a lot of the paint on the door before brushing. For the detailed molding I took the mini roller and just ran it along the inside and it worked quite well. Meaning I didn't use it as a roller but more as a brush or pad.

I was in a rush this morning and quickly took a few pictures before the photographer got here and looks like there might be some steam on my lens.

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newmisty

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Ha, look what I just found outside in garden bed under a shrubbery...it's actually a nice little whisk...

IMG_20200805_143321276.jpg
 

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Built a couple doors from some $1.50 a board oak pipeline salvage (10 footers), panels are 130 year old pine salvage. All mortise and tenon. Ordered the dual pane glass - got everything else - hinges, lock set, etc.


door1.jpg
door2.jpg
doors5.jpg
 
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newmisty

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Built a couple doors from some $1.50 a board oak pipeline salvage (10 footers), panels are 130 year old pine salvage. All mortise and tenon. Ordered the dual pane glass - got everything else - hinges, lock set, etc.


View attachment 175427 View attachment 175428
She's gorgeous! Great work. What you have for a table saw? Love the giant outfeed table. Oh and how much time did it take you to build the door?
 

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She's gorgeous! Great work. What you have for a table saw? Love the giant outfeed table. Oh and how much time did it take you to build the door?
Table saw is a 10' SCM from Italy (Minimax) - 3hp. I built 2 at the same time and I'm into them about 20 hours. There's a lot of details to go.

If you ever need custom glass, these guys are good, but it takes a few weeks.

https://www.fabglassandmirror.com/customcut/insulated

doors3.jpg
doors4.jpg
 
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newmisty

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Scarf Joint with a skill saw

How to Create a Scarf Joint like a Pro!

 

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Safety Sunday...

MUST WATCH! How table saw kickback injuries occur, and how to STOP them!

 

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newmisty

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Don't get caught putting your thingy in the pickle slicer.
Construction Worker Caught Playing With His Tool On The Job
By David Moye
12/02/2014 12:34 PM ET
|
Updated Dec 06, 2017
It’s a video you won’t see on HGTV: A construction worker playing with his tool on the job.
The masturbating builder was hired this past summer as part of a major renovation of a housing estate, in Chaucer House, Sutton Common, in the United Kingdom. He was caught with his pants down by a surveillance camera set up by the couple who owned the house, the Sutton Guardian reports.

https://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_6255062?test_ad=taboola_iframe_mw_news
 

newmisty

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Even though overall their paint job is a C at best, the technique I've shown before of 'boxing in' with tape and caulk, looks real sharp:


IMG_20200811_160518349.jpg
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newmisty

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Got a couple new toys, I mean tools recently.

IMG_20200812_174248876.jpg


Fell head over heels for my buddy's cordless multi-tool. Previously I was using a couple different cheap corded varieties. The difference is like t-ball versus the big leagues. I miss the wall you just squeeze a lever and insert or remove the blade and easily position it at different angles. the trigger is a sensitive variable speed trigger so you can go from a gentle vibration to full-on git er done.

IMG_20200812_174254803.jpg

Like I posted a few pages back the carbide tip blades coupled with this are nearly indescribable. You can zip off 16 penny nails on a few different jobs and still cut through wood.

This is the blade you want. Ignore the price tag and just buy it.



The blower isn't for leaves so don't worry andial, I haven't been summoned over to the dark side. Spring rakes will always be my trusted, loysl friend. It's perfect for blowing off dust before/after a job and great for getting saw dust out of my bags (tool belt) and stuff. Not too powerful but good enough for that. One of my 20v 4 amp hr batteries seems to run at full throttle for 4- 5 minutes.

IMG_20200812_174301122.jpg

BTW Hammerhead, ive been meaning to offer you all my old DeWalt 18v tools. Even got a little circ saw. I just haven't dug them out and consolidated them yet, but if you want them they're yours and I will.
 

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Got the final touches on the Cooling systems, now just need power. Downstairs got a 2.5 ton Trane. Upstairs 1 bedroom got a 1 ton Daikin Minisplit. The other two upstairs will get window units, since they have perfect spots for them. In the future when I have more time will add minisplits to replace the window units. To replace all the HVAC in the entire building new boiler, new furnace A/C, the minisplit, two window units and moving gas meter I will be under 10k total. Also moved 3 radiators which was a pain in the ass. Building probably has one of the sweetest mechanical room/HVAC systems out there.

Got the old Front sign hung up in the Mechanical room. The historical society wanted it, but we told them to screw off. Thought it should stay with the building.


hvac.jpg


mechanical room_LI.jpg
 
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newmisty

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I've never seen a dirty whistle...
That's funny. Actually after I wrote that and posted it, I thought for half a minute about where that expression came from and then kind of shook my head and carried on ..maybe Irons has dug one up with his beepy stick.
 

newmisty

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Got the final touches on the Cooling systems, now just need power. Downstairs got a 2.5 ton Trane. Upstairs 1 bedroom got a 1 ton Daikin Minisplit. The other two upstairs will get window units, since they have perfect spots for them. In the future when I have more time will add minisplits to replace the window units. To replace all the HVAC in the entire building new boiler, new furnace A/C, the minisplit, two window units and moving gas meter I will be under 10k total. Also moved 3 radiators which was a pain in the ass. Building probably has one of the sweetest mechanical room/HVAC systems out there.

Got the old Front sign hung up in the Mechanical room. The historical society wanted it, but we told them to screw off. Thought it should stay with the building.


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Looking real sharp Davy. Got me beaming with pride over here.

Where I'm working they just put up a house with that white brick/ black trim styling. I then noticed there's another one across the street from the house I'm working at and wondered what they actually call it. I like it.

They did a good job putting this one together. Use green board with zip tape and then the masons bricked it up and the next time I came by it was white & took out a whole new look. I'm sure this was over a million as the crappy house I'm working on now is three-quarters of a mil.
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newmisty

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I think a whistle has to be clean to work, ergo: the dirty whistle ends up on the dustbin of history. So profound!
Is that why we have to wet our whistle? Or is it whet?
 

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Been doing more repairs on the house with the door apparently painted by special effects artists. They had a rusted corroded bathroom vent that I was asked if I could repaint or replace. I said that's gotta be replaced, thing's nasty. But lately I've been giving myself challenges in both time, skill and a combination thereof. So I did a super fast body work job on the vent with pretty good success under the conditions.

First thing I did was took my utility knife and cut the blisters and rust off as best I could. Then I took a small square of 80 grit and hit it hard with that. For getting in between the slats I did the same thing with the knife followed by trying to drive little wedges/rolls of the paper in between get enough movement and momentum to actually do anything. Mind you I'm trying to do all this giving myself about 15 minutes. In my head. So did that then sprayed it with rust reformer. Great product if you're not familiar with it. I used it on my badly rusted rocker panels, didn't even coat it with paint and it's held up really well... Both the product and rockers)



Then I very quickly hit it with an old worn-out sponge sander...it was probably around 200 grit. And I took some wall spackle that was on hand gave it a quick coat followed by another quick light sanding with the sponge. I hit it with several coats of Kilz spray primer which (shhhh) happened to be an uncanny match to the wall pain that had been used. Kilz spray primer has a yellowish tint to it which was very evident in the last remodel we did when I used it to touch up the white walls. So to give it a proper finish for durability and aesthetics, I hit it with a spray polyurethane which a little surprisingly brought out a lot more of the yellow color. Was a perfect match. I really don't know how much time I spent on it but probably about a half an hour.

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hammerhead

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BTW Hammerhead, ive been meaning to offer you all my old DeWalt 18v tools. Even got a little circ saw. I just haven't dug them out and consolidated them yet, but if you want them they're yours and I will.
Mighty nice of you to offer them up, Mr. misty. If you're willing to do that, it would be a good excuse to get together.

I recently had to break down and buy a new drill/driver set. Newer one is 20v and lighter with the smaller battery although it doesn't last too long. I'm very pleased with the DeWalt line. Can't remember when I actually bought the last set, it has been so long ago.
 

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Hired me some new help today and got off to a promising start on a new frame job.

997AD25E-372E-4E8D-8F9D-B8285528D9F4.jpeg


Apollo Reign, 7 weeks old today. Showed lots of potential around the sawhorses as an adorable trip hazard. He was under my feet for three hours, every where I went.

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Then he decided he’d had enough of the carpenter action

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Poor guy slept from 11 until 4:30.
 

newmisty

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Hired me some new help today and got off to a promising start on a new frame job.

View attachment 177274

Apollo Reign, 7 weeks old today. Showed lots of potential around the sawhorses as an adorable trip hazard. He was under my feet for three hours, every where I went.

View attachment 177272

Then he decided he’d had enough of the carpenter action

View attachment 177273

Poor guy slept from 11 until 4:30.
Need to see he's already got you wrapped around his paw.
 

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Hired me some new help today and got off to a promising start on a new frame job.

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Apollo Reign, 7 weeks old today. Showed lots of potential around the sawhorses as an adorable trip hazard. He was under my feet for three hours, every where I went.

View attachment 177272

Then he decided he’d had enough of the carpenter action

View attachment 177273

Poor guy slept from 11 until 4:30.
Cute, now. You'll be shoveling major loads of shit soon :)

doggy.jpg
 
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Goldhedge

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Site Mgr
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GIM Hall Of Fame
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Mar 28, 2010
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If you want to see some really cool skills watch this guy make a router table. I sped it up 2.0x (gear icon lower right).

Make a Router table
 
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